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Inode numbers don't matter to normal applications. This is partly because there's little use for inode numbers, and partly because if an application depended on inode numbers, it would stop working after a backup-and-restore cycle. So backup systems don't restore the inode numbers, so applications don't depend on them, so backup systems don't need to restore ...


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It's possible the problem lies on an improper passing of the path with wildcard character by the duplicity to the rsync. Look at the example below. This is the real example of passing excludes to the rsync by an environment variable within a script: EXCLUDES="--exclude=/etc/blkid.tab --exclude=/root/dir1 --exclude='*.sql'" Notice that quotation marks '' ...


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Include / (the root filesystem), and include the root of any other filesystem you want to back up (for example, if /home is on a separate partition, include it as well). Use the -x option to exclude all other filesystems: in-memory filesystems like /proc and /sys, mounted removable media, remote filesystems, etc. Exclude the files you don't want to back up. ...


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You can take full system backup using rsync. You can use --exlude=PATTERN for all directories that do not required . rsync -- a fast, versatile, remote (and local) file-copying tool -a, --archive archive mode; equals -rlptgoD (no -H,-A,-X) -A, --acls preserve ACLs (implies -p) -X, --xattrs preserve ...


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So, the --exclude-from file, will be: var/tmp/ var/cache/ and use rsync like this: rsync -aAv --delete --stats --exclude-from /excludes /home /var /usr/local /etc /Backup/


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No, ssh user@server sudo tar cf - / | dd of=server_clone.tar (or even worse, tar cf /everything.tar / and then copy the file off) is not likely to be an efficient way to produce a "clone" down the road, although it may be a stopgap measure if you're worried about soon-to-fail hardware or a security incident. Some problems: /proc will give a lot of ...


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The python-gdata on Ubuntu 12.04 is 2.0.14-2, this is outdated. Download latest python-gdata deb from http://mirrors.kernel.org/ubuntu/pool/universe/p/python-gdata/python-gdata_2.0.18+dfsg-1_all.deb and then run dpkg -i python-gdata_2.0.18+dfsg-1_all.deb


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Rsync on its own supports incremental backup. You can use the '-i' option to view the changes between source & destination directory. Usage would be; rsync -avzi root@hostip:/var/big /root/tmp


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To avoid these kinds of issues the normal sysadmin approach is to separate each backup from the others. A simple way to do this is to save the data into a single file with the current date or timestamp in the name. tar can do this easily: tar -cf "/backups/$(date +%Y%m%dT%H%M%S).tar" /some/path If it's easily compressible data (such as text files) you can ...


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I think rsnapshot will be ideal for you. It uses rsync, will make incremental differential backups of your home directory, so that you can get back to data backed-up a while (for instance week) ago. It will not copy whole every time but only what has changed. Easy to setup, all commandline. HTH, Cheers



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