New answers tagged

0

The easiest way to do this is with two USB drives. or a CD-ROM and a USB drive. One can be quite small to hold a bootable Clonezilla system (needs only a few hundred MB). The smallest USB thumb drive you can buy will be more than enough. Or burn it to a CD-ROM (but CDs are more fragile and booting & running from CD is slower than USB). The second ...


1

You can use squashfs to make a squashed version of your filesystem. First check if squashfs-tools is installed or not. I don't know the exact name of the package. So look up google to install it on your Ubuntu. After you install it, run- sudo mount /dev/xxx /mnt (Replace xxx with the proper partition name. This must be the partition where your OS is ...


1

The usual method is (writing from memory): NEWBACKUP=`date +%s` # or some other format cp -al "$OLDBACKUP" "$NEWBACKUP" rsync -aH --delete "$SOURCE" "$NEWBACKUP" Check out Easy Automated Snapshot-Style Backups with Linux and Rsync There is also a --link-dest option to rsync that I've never investigated properly.


1

The command tar czf /media/masi/ntfsDisc/backup_home.tar.gz $HOME/ is the same as this: tar cf - $HOME/ | gzip > /media/masi/ntfsDisc/backup_home.tar.gz When you ran top, it showed the gzip was using up around 100% of one cpu thread. The NTFS FUSE software is using up a nonzero amount of CPU, too, but essentially you're CPU-bound because of that ...


3

First of all, the the overall power consumption will be likely the same or more if you artificially slow down the backup process. Simply because the total number of operations is the same and if the process takes longer, the cpu consumes less peak power but over a longer time. For example, if the process runs for 10 s at peak power of 200W this will consume ...


2

One approach would be to use parallel compression in order to use all of the cores of your system and therefore reduce the compression time. It won't reduce the load on your system, but it will be loaded for a shortest amount of time ! You can find how to do it in this Q/A for example : utilizing-multi-core-for-targzip-bzip-compression-decompression For ...


0

Let's say you want to restore Foo's directory "bar" from his home directory (which is /home/foo), your command would look like this: /usr/share/backuppc/bin/Backuppc_tarCreate -h host -n -1 -s /home/foo/bar > restore.tar Flags : -h host Host from which the tar archive is created. -n dumpNum Dump number from which the tar archive is ...


0

It won't let me comment because I don't have enough rep, but a quick Google search gives this: http://backuppc.sourceforge.net/faq/BackupPC.html#Compressed-file-format Also this: You can use the BackupPC_zcat binary to decompress individual files manually. http://www.backupcentral.com/phpBB2/two-way-mirrors-of-external-mailing-lists-3/backuppc-21/...


1

One solution is to make a union mount of B and C with C as the write branch. Then the problem reduces to copying from A to B+C only files missing on B+C, which can be done with rsync -a --ignore-existing /A /B+C For the union mount, one possibility is unionfs-fuse. unionfs-fuse -o cow /C=RW:/B=RO /B+C Or unionfs: mount -t unionfs -o dirs=/C=rw:/B=ro ...


0

Yes. After restoring your dd image to the new larger LV you would need to "fsck -f" (to force a check on the resulting image, and ensure it is marked clean) and then "resize2fs" the LV in order for the restored image to expand and see the new space.


0

Someone may have a script (or write one). I do this sort of thing either using zip, or a script which uses gzip or bzip2. Both have provisions for removing the files after the archive is complete. The issues are you can certainly write compressed archives for each directory until the archive is complete, you cannot remove the directory you cannot update ...


0

Did you set the Where option correctly during the restore? From the manual: before running the job, please note that the default location for restoring files is not their original locations, but rather the directory /tmp/bacula-restores


3

According to its man page, ddrescue should be called like this: SYNOPSIS ddrescue [options] infile outfile [logfile] So, in your specific case, ddrescue /dev/sda /mnt/hdd/backup.hdd; no if= or of=.


1

debsums can help you out quite a bit. The oft-quoted debsums -ce will list configuration files which have been changed, from the pool of tracked configuration files; so it's not a complete solution. Instead, you should run debsums -e, and ignore any file which is marked "OK". Anything else — which includes files listed by debsums as "FAILED", and files not ...


0

The btrfs Wiki lists several Incremental Backup tools that are suitable in response to this question. btrbk is the one I am currently using and it meets most of the requirements mentioned in the question. I say "most" because the question was not clear regarding the differences between snapshots and a true versioning file system (which btrfs is not). But ...


2

looks like you backed up to ~user/home/user/backup on the target machine. try (notice the extra slash signalling an absolute path) duplicity full /home sftp://user@hostname.com//home/user/backup or alternatively duplicity full /home sftp://user@hostname.com/backup . ..ede/duply.net


2

To do nothing if the file already exists in the destination tree (regardless of any metadata), pass the option --ignore-existing to rsync. rsync -a --remove-source-files --ignore-existing /var/www/domain/media/ /var/www/domain/bak/


0

As you are using LVM, you could utilize the volume shapshots: each time you would like to synchronize your cloned versions of volumes with the actual ones you create snapshots, then rsync the snapshot volumes to clones and then destroy snapshots again. The initial creation of a cloned volumes could be also achieved with LVM's mirroring of a volume on ...


3

Best practice would be to not only unmount but additionally disconnect the backup. You presumably expect your backup to protect you in case (for example) someone accidentally downloads a cryptolocker. Or someone breaks in (compromises) your system. Or a weird system crash that corrupts filesystems. Or a lightning surge that fries all your electronic devices ...


3

rm --one-file-system should do the trick. --one-file-system when removing a hierarchy recursively, skip any directory that is on a file system different from that of the corresponding command line argument Source: http://man7.org/linux/man-pages/man1/rm.1.html



Top 50 recent answers are included