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I will just provide a short answer because I think this is being overthought. If you read the main kernel wiki about the btrfs (sub-)commands, you will find that there are two commands for making a backup and restore. Just in case, this means that it is not designed to be a backup, but to be an snapshot filesystem, with the idea of rolling back if needed, ...


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Nothing is excluded. It's a level 0 dump, it dumps everything on that file system. A level 1 dump would dump everything that was changed since the last level 0 dump. A level 2 dump would change everything changed up to the last level 1 dump (if there was a level 1 dump, otherwise back to the level 0 dump). Hence you could do incremental backups by ...


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In order to have files deleted in destination when they are deleted in origin, you use the --delete option. rsync -vaz --delete <origin_folder> <destination_folder> Now destination will delete items within it when origin does.


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There are several delete options to choose from here is the extract from the man rsync page. --delete delete extraneous files from dest dirs --delete-before receiver deletes before xfer, not during --delete-during receiver deletes during the transfer --delete-delay find deletions ...


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The Default restore directory is /tmp With the option -T u can specify another directory. U can read more about restore. http://linux.about.com/od/commands/l/blcmdl8_restore.htm


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You can compare the backup with the current contents of the system using restore: restore -C -f backup where backup is the file containing your backup. You can also list the contents of a backup: restore -t -f backup


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The command you give, dump -0f /dev/sdc1 /dev/sda2 will back up the contents of /dev/sda2, overwriting all the first partition of your USB key (which won't mean much to standard disk tools then). If you want to generate a backup file on your USB key instead, you need to mount the key and tell dump to dump to a file on the key: dump -0f /media/usb/backup ...


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To copy a disk to an identical disk use low level command dd. Or use tuned and safe save tools. Obviously the copied disk have not to be accessed by the system (except dd itself).dd is usually used to make a clone for a bootable disk to another bootable one. Unix doc Basic sample


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Is there any specific reason you want to use dump? For file-level backup, tar is far more common. You can also do "incremental" backups using the "-N" option (see http://www.gnu.org/software/tar/manual/html_section/tar_53.html). Also, you can use data compression on-the-fly using algorithms like gzip, bzip2 or lzma/xz. Directly storing to magnetic tapes is ...


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I found the same question you asked, here, and they solved. Anyway there are tons of solutions but according to the link i posted, Clonezilla it's a well known sw to do this work.


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You should add the following to your gnu tar command: --warning=no-file-changed That will suppress all the "%s: file changed as we read it" messages. And by using this solution (and not redirecting everything to /dev/null), you will still be able to get error messages when stuff really goes wrong.. With the --warning flag you can enable and disable a lot ...


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What you might be looking for is such a trivial shell script, it's no surprise "pre-built" programs are scarce. How this script works depends on how you organize your backups. If you are sure you can rely on the backup tar-ball's file-creation time-stamp, you can simply use find: find /backup-dir -type f -ctime +366 -exec echo rm -f {} + Will find all ...


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If you make a backup of all your partitions, you should have all data. Clonezilla will also create a backup file of your MBR and how your partition table is set up. If you have no weird copy protection system or something installed on your computer (that would save license information if supposedly free blocks for example) then the partition backup should ...


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I am using duplicity with OpenStack-Storage. It also features encryption (symmetric and PGP) and incremental backups. Available for download at http://duplicity.nongnu.org/ or installable via apt-get. My thoughts of duplicity are, that it is quite actively developed and has a huge range of possible storage adapters, so that you should be able to easily fit ...


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rsnapshot is a perl script that uses rsync to create backup's of files, it can be configured to retain a count (number) of backups, eg 12 monthly backups, deletes older backups automatically. Periods can be set in hours, days, weeks, months and as you have already guessed, it would be invoked automatically by cron. I've used it to create daily snapshots of ...


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I have tried so much backup and restore software and was never happy. This is what I do now: I have a second Debian installed on a spare computer (same MB, NIC card, etc). Every evening I rsync from machine A to machine B. There are some files that I hold back (/etc/network/interfaces, /etc/hosts, /etc/hostname) since I don't want conflicts of the two ...


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Package management is one of the main differentiators between distributions. Between unrelated distributions, you won't be able to do anything automatic. Different distributions break down software into different sets of packages and use different names. Between machines running the same version of the same distribution, you can achieve a similar ...


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If you're staying within the Debian family, yes, you can transfer them very easily. Just list the currently installed packages, save them to a file and then read that file to reinstall them: Save the installed packages in the file installed: dpkg -l | grep ^ii | awk '{print $2}' > installed In your newly installed Debian-based distro, install the ...


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rsync -a --no-specials --no-devices would tell rsync to skip these files. It will still print an information message, but it would return 0 if no other error occurs. If there's a set of known paths that you don't want to transfer, you could exclude them altogether. Also, do pass the -x option to skip all mounted filesystems (including /dev, which takes care ...


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Maybe you could use rsync together with find? Something like this: find /your/source/dir -type s 1> /tmp/ignore-list rsync <your options> --exclude-from=/tmp/ignore-list /your/source/dir/ /your/destination/dir/


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use --include-globbing-filelist instead. before 0.7.03 ordinary file list parameters were globbing agnostic. wrt. the symlink issue. this might be a corner case as the symlink resolves to a destination in an excluded folder. try including + /usr/src/linux*/.config generally use either globbing syntax or not, as outlined in the answer you linked above. ...


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I think this signature is stored to your /root/.ecryptfs/sig-cache.txt (or ~/.ecryptfs/sig-cache.txt ) and is used to verify that the filesystem has been opened with those params before ( e.g. so that you do not put a wrong password and corrupt files etc) you might want to back up the mentioned file, although if you are sure about the password, it will be ...



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