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I've seen this happen with GNOME updates around file monitoring bits (e.g. nautilus) - it may be the same for KDE. I would look for anything that monitors file state, filesystem usage, or the like, and turn it off.


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One the popular accepted solutions to this problem is using a configuration management system. Some examples are puppet, chef, and saltstack. These systems allow you to define exactly what a server (or in some cases an application stack) looks like. Using these tools you define a server's state, including its configuration. Here is an example of a very ...


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Debian has a package for you to take care of dumping, compressing and rotating MySQL data. You can install it with the following command: $ sudo apt-get install automysqlbackup After this daily, weekly and monthly dumps will be placed in /var/lib/automysqlbackup


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Read the fine manual: man 5 crontab : There you will see that "%" has a special meaning for cron. That is clobbering up your intended command. apart from this this is a very bad way to start a mySQL-backup: Your root-DB-password will appear in the process list viewable for every local user or every user with snmp read access You should not start a ...


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Using prefixes or suffixes is common, because it's easily filtered. It's usually ~ for backup. Most text editors use this, and it is possible to explicitly tell ls to not list them by default. This is similar to using a period at the beginning to make the file somewhat hidden (this is also respected by ls and by shell globbing). Other examples are ...


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Rsync only refrains from copying a file if it thinks the copy in the destination tree is identical to the copy in the target tree. By default, it assumes that the files are identical if they have the same size and the same modification time. You can pass the option -c to make rsync calculate a checksum instead (which is a lot slower since it has to read the ...


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A bit late to the party here, but you can achieve unique backup functionality in nano (at least in the current Debian version 2.2.6) using the -B and -C flags. From the Debian man page: -B (--backup) When saving a file, back up the previous version of it to the current filename suffixed with a ~. -C dir (--backupdir=dir) ...


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A hardlink is by definition a link to an inode. Multiple hardlinks to an inode hence do not need additional inodes... The only thing that will increase inode usage is that for each "generation" the directory tree itself will be duplicated, so for each directory in each generation an additional inode will be needed, whether files are changed or not. That ...


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First off, you probably want to make sure the you don't have the click of death. This is repeated clicking/knocking noises which indicate a head crash on you hard disk (or some other catastrophic failure). If you have this, you may want to consider taking the drive to a specialist depending on how important the data is. You can try Recovering data from a ...



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