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1

Using distributed (not centralized) version control is a valid backup strategy which is complementary to the more usual backup approaches. There is much to be said for using both methods simultaneously. Let us review how standard backups work. Typically, all the files on a filesystem are copied to some remote location. This is done on some fixed periodic ...


3

Version control and backup serve different purposes on a different administration level. In projects you control and manage your code with configuration management and version control systems, and on the systems level the admins (IT-division or local administrators) make backups of every relevant data store (be it home-directories of users, or production ...


1

For several years I've been using a script wrapper around vi that saves the files I'm editing. It does this at most once per day so that I don't end up with too many backup files. This is a simpler version of the script I use; perhaps it's useful for you too. Instead of running vi, you would run vib (vi with backup): vib() { local DATE=$(date ...


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With a large enough value of 'undolevel', Vim should be able to undo the whole day's changes. If you quit Vim in between, you also need to enable persistent undo by setting the 'undofile' option. Vim captures not just a sequential list of commands for undo, but actually a tree of all changes. It also has several commands around undo (cp. :help ...


1

As I understand it you're looking to create a mirror (or close enough to one) of your system hard drive, so as to utilize the mirror in the event of say a disk failure. To me this looks like a case for RAID 1. This can be done with either BTRFS or MDADM. In either case when connecting the external drive back to the system, you'll need to ensure it is seen ...


1

Look at Moving /etc to separate partition for reasons it's difficult (if not impossible) to use separate partitions for /etc or subdirectories thereof. You might find etckeeper useful for your use-case; it allows keeping /etc in a version-control system such as git, which means you can then easily maintain a copy somewhere else with all the history. If ...


0

Computing and verifying cryptographic checksums is a good method to detect changed file content, e.g. due to hard disk errors. Like many cryptographic hash functions SHA-2 comes as a family of variants that differ in the digest size and initial values. Since the probability to get a hash collision due to (random) bit errors is very low - even with MD5, you ...


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I don't think using both md5 and a short sha-2 gives you more certainty then using sha512sum alone. Your method is in principle ok, but you can make the checking much easier by redirecting the output of sha512sum *.tar to a file sums and copy that to the destination machine as well. Then do: sha512sum -c sums on the destination machine and it generates ...


0

The following is perhaps a good starting point, as it explains what one popular text editor (Emacs) can do as far as backup files are concerned: How do I control how Emacs makes backup files? In summary, without any special configuration, when one starts modifying file foo, a copy of its initial state is created as foo~, and any existing contents of foo~ ...


1

Have you already experienced a system crash where you needed to restore the working filesystem from a backup? I'd propose you setup a reference system and then draw the plug. Depending on your amount of data you then can decide, if you need daily, weekly or monthly full backups.


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Part I: File system layout Create a Raid1-array out of the 2x640GB (mdadm) and format the array with, e.g., ext4 (You loose all data on those drives!). Format the 60GB SSD with, e.g., ext4 (You loose all data on this drive!). Adapt /etc/fstab on the ubuntu drive: Add two entries for the array and the 60GB SSD. It depends on your flavor to mount the array ...


1

For the reasons mentioned in the comments, file managers do usually not use rsync to copy, but above all, a good backup solution should be incremental. Just imagine that one of your students makes an accidental change in a file and then copies it, as he was told to do as soon as possible, over the previous backup (using a file manager or rsync). A graphical ...


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I'd support the idea of @Miline to use RAID1 (or RAID5) for data integrity. For the 3-way backup, I'm using rsnapshot for creating incremental backups and rsync with --delete parameter to sync the backup over ssh to another system.


0

This is my preferred solution: find source_dir -iname '*.jpg' -print0 | rsync -0 -v --files-from=- . destination_dir/ The find command is easier to understand than the include/exclude rules of rsync :-) If you want to copy only pdf files, just change .jpg to .pdf


1

There are two options. Both use rsync. Either: Only update share1 and share2, deleting unknown files in the target rsync --dry-run -avP --delete .../src/share1 .../src/share2 .../des/ Or: Update everything in des, deleting unknown files in the target except for des1 rsync --dry-run -avP --delete --exclude '/des1' .../src/ .../des/ When you're happy ...


1

The clue is in the line: Matched data: 0 bytes This means that for some reason no blocks at all of the old file were matched with the new file, meaning that the entire file has been transferred. If you're interested in the network traffic, then the following line gives accurate information about this: sent 13.78M bytes received 31 bytes 27.56M ...


0

What you want sounds like having a Truecrypt disk file synced with Dropbox. Something is changed in the Truecrypt file, and only the changed part is uploaded to Dropbox. This seems to be the case. See: rsync - Backup only changed blocks? You add something to the file, making it larger. That is not the same, and I don't think that will work, unless you put ...


2

You can do this with the commands from the acl package (which should be available on all mainstream distributions, but might not be part of the base installation). They back up and restore ACL when ACL are present, but they also work for basic permissions even on systems that don't support ACL. To back up permissions in the current directory and its ...


0

I'm not aware of anything "off the shelf" that would do this. Here's a starter script for you, though, that will handle basic permissions. It does not handle ACLs of any description - but your Question explicitly excludes those. (It will also fail on pathological filenames - those starting with whitespace, or containing non-printable characters.) Save the ...


0

sudo would seem to fit in this case. sudo for terminal (cli) commands and something like gksu for gui commands is pretty standard. The problems your having probably have noting to do with how you choose to elevate permissions. For example, holding the terminal open is the job of the emulator, and has noting to do with bash.


0

If you can do a little coding (editing a config file and setting up a cron job or a logon script), you can use Simple Backup Script. It's very easy to use and will backup to disk and able to be configured to keep redundant copies with logging. Regarding external drives, I would suggest either a Western Digital "My Book" or "My Cloud." 1) The "My Book" ...


-1

Backup divide into somewhere : Partion Table => sfidsk -d YOUR_DEVICE > mytable.dump Hard Copy backup , i don't recommend , it's hardware backup and is related to your hw and when your target hw has been changed, your data will be destroyed. You can do it via dd command Data backup : you can o it easily with tar command, But you have to consider some ...


2

It is possible to copy relative symlinks using --links option: -l, --links When symlinks are encountered, recreate the symlink on the destination. Also: Note that --archive implies --links. Example: $ mkdir /tmp/tarsnap-test/ $ cd /tmp/tarsnap-test/ $ mkdir orig backup $ cd orig/ $ mkdir dir $ ln -s dir symlink $ ll total ...


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Rsync backups: You do not need the program around if you used pure "mirroring" rsync. Just copy the files back (cp -a) If you use regular incremental snapshots with hard-links as for example in this popular setup you will also be fine. I think, however, than some rsync-based programs may have their own way of handling incremental backups, e.g. to support ...


1

–link-dest should be --link-dest. I copied –link-destfrom the linked webpage, and still don't know how to tell – and - from each other in a webpage and in terminal. If you know, can you tell me? Thanks.



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