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6

With a large enough value of 'undolevel', Vim should be able to undo the whole day's changes. If you quit Vim in between, you also need to enable persistent undo by setting the 'undofile' option. Vim captures not just a sequential list of commands for undo, but actually a tree of all changes. It also has several commands around undo (cp. :help ...


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Duplicity creates snapshots, but in the form of compressed archives, not in a form that can be read directly. There are several ways to create snapshots. Some advanced filesystems such as ZFS and Btrfs have them as a built-in feature, as do some disk layers such as LVM. On a generic filesystem, a basic technique is to reproduce the directory tree that you ...


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Version control and backup serve different purposes on a different administration level. In projects you control and manage your code with configuration management and version control systems, and on the systems level the admins (IT-division or local administrators) make backups of every relevant data store (be it home-directories of users, or production ...


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This is actually the default behaviour of rsync. In one of its simpliest use, you can run: rsync -av /path/to/files/ /backup/ If one file has been removed from /path/to/files/, it will still be in /backup. If you want to change this behaviour (ie: remove the file from the /backup directory when it doesn't exist anymore in /path/to/files/), then just ...


2

I think you can get away with using split's --filter=COMMAND. ... | split -b <SIZE> -d - part --filter=./split-filter where ./split-filter is something like #!/bin/bash set -e n="${FILE#part}" case $((10#$n%3)) in 0) dd bs=64K >"path1/$FILE" ;; 1) dd bs=64K >"path2/$FILE" ;; 2) dd bs=64K ...


1

Using distributed (not centralized) version control is a valid backup strategy which is complementary to the more usual backup approaches. There is much to be said for using both methods simultaneously. Let us review how standard backups work. Typically, all the files on a filesystem are copied to some remote location. This is done on some fixed periodic ...


1

Easiest way is probably to install Ubuntu 14.04 on the new system including mysql-server packages you already have installed on the old system; use dpkg -l mysql\* to show what those packages are (make your terminal wide enough first to not truncate columns). Ensure the new system has the same or newer versions (not older versions). Now stop mysql on old ...


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Figured it out! mtx functions only on "generic" SCSI devices. The /dev/sch0 device provided by the ch kernel driver is something of a red herring. It turns out that SCSI devices are given "generic" device files, in addition to whatever driver-backed specific devices are created. You can find those using lsscsi: $ lsscsi --generic [0:0:19:0] enclosu ...


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Dump requires direct access to the underlying block device. So you can't use it on a network filesystem, unless you run it on the server (in this case, you'd need to run dump on the NAS, not on a client of the NAS). Or remove the drives from the NAS and attach them to a PC, presuming you can assemble any RAID arrays that the NAS created. As a side note, you ...


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For several years I've been using a script wrapper around vi that saves the files I'm editing. It does this at most once per day so that I don't end up with too many backup files. This is a simpler version of the script I use; perhaps it's useful for you too. Instead of running vi, you would run vib (vi with backup): vib() { local DATE=$(date ...


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As I understand it you're looking to create a mirror (or close enough to one) of your system hard drive, so as to utilize the mirror in the event of say a disk failure. To me this looks like a case for RAID 1. This can be done with either BTRFS or MDADM. In either case when connecting the external drive back to the system, you'll need to ensure it is seen ...



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