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8

To do this daily in most Linux distros, you should be able to just put the rsync command (as per @guido's answer) in a script and put the script in the /etc/cron.daily directory. As long as anacron is installed (may not be by default) any missed cron.daily jobs will be caught up on the next time the machine boots (as well as being run at midnight if the ...


4

In addition to all the previous answers, here's one that relies on SSH keys with restrictions on what can be done when logged in with that key. On server A On this one it's less important if you create a separate user or use one of your existing usernames, though if it were me I'd create a separate user. I will use the username bkpuser for both servers in ...


3

I would take a look at this guide from the CrashPlan website titled: CONFIGURING A HEADLESS CLIENT. It spells out the details of how one would go about installing CrashPlan for use in a headless situation, which is really what you want. But I just want to disable the GUI If you're using a desktop environment such as GNOME you can launch the configuration ...


3

What makes you think X-related processes are still running? When you log in remotely xrdp (re-)connects you to your GUI environment. If you don't have one running already then xrdp-sesman will cause a GUI environment to get initialized. (If you want to prevent that you could sudo service xrdp stop although it will likely come back on re-boot unless you ...


3

No you'll typically see no output from gzip when you use it to compress or uncompress. Examples Say I have a sample file. $ ll | grep a.img -rw-rw-r--. 1 saml saml 1474560 Mar 31 21:57 a.img compressing $ gzip a.img $ $ ll | grep a.img -rw-rw-r--. 1 saml saml 944497 Mar 31 21:57 a.img.gz uncompressing $ gzip -d a.img.gz $ $ ll | grep ...


3

There are a number of things that could be done here. Note that none of the actually use hard links since they can only point to a full file. Using the btrfs filesystem opens up some vary useful possibilities here. Note that btrfs is currently (most recent version is v3.13) still experimental. However, its COW (copy-on-write) ability is perfect for this kind ...


2

I would suggest using rdiff-backup. I use it now to make automatic incremental backups every night of my own data (two workstations, two servers and one account on someone else's server). I used rsync earlier for this, but switched to rdiff-backup since it is more convenient, and it can make incremental backups of large files such as virtual machine disk ...


2

With GNU date (default on Linux Mint) you can do: mysqldump -uroot -p MyDatabase >/home/users/backup_MyDB/$(date +%F)_full_myDB.sql To delete files older than 1 week: find /home/users/backup_MyDB -type f -mtime +7 -exec rm {} + Although generally it is wise to see what you are deleting before you delete (at least when testing you script) for this ...


1

First make sure the user that you are going to use to make the backups: can read all the 5 folders and their content is able to use ssh into the server with the LTO ( lets call that 'remote') without authentication into an acount named ltouser. If necessary setup such an account. can write to the tape after doing the ssh, assume the device name is ...


1

You mention you don't like tar --list because it's slow. I'm guessing this is because it's a large tarball, and it has to re-scan the whole thing. If this is indeed the case, you can get better performance out of this by scanning as it's being created: tar -c /input/directory | tee output.tar | tar -t > filelist.txt This uses tee to split the resulting ...


1

Though it is not the best answer, I found something that works by adding the following to my exclude-list.txt file: *syncTest/excludeTest/* I found the answer here: http://sourceforge.net/p/s3tools/bugs/81/ It is not intuitive, and I think it is a bug. I do not think that rsync has this problem, and it is probably specific to s3cmd. Very annoying! I am ...


1

If the server must login to your home server, you could restrict SSH access via chroot. For your usecase however I'd go the other way around: let your home server fetch the backup from the server, so the server doesn't need to login to your home server at all.


1

NOTE: I added this answer regarding some other question about deleted database files (MySQL server) which was closed and pointed to this one. I believe it can be useful in some other similar situations too (as far as some process still holds the file descriptors open). If your process is still runnig then you can find your files in /proc/<pid>fd/ and ...



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