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Assume that you have # at beginning of comment lines, so you can do: yum -y install $(awk '!/^#/' list) !/^#/ cause awk to ignore any lines that start with #, print the rest.


2

There are very few files that absolutely must be different between two machines, and need to be regenerated when cloning: The host name /etc/hostname. The SSH host keys: /etc/ssh_host_*_key* or /etc/ssh/ssh_host_*_key* or similar location. The random seed: /var/lib/urandom/random-seed or /var/lib/random-seed or similar location. Anything else could be ...


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/var/cache is not a free-for-all like /var/tmp. Each service that requires it has a subdirectory in /var/cache with appropriate permissions for it to store files. On Debian and derived distributions, you can run dpkg -S /var/cache to find what packages have set up directories under /var/cache, and apt-get --reinstall install PACKAGE_NAME … to reinstall ...


1

Fortunately I still had a copy of the corrupted filesystem, so I had some idea of what should go in /var/cache for my system. cd /var/cache sudo mkdir apache2 apt ddclient debconf dictionaries-common fontconfig ldconfig man modsecurity sudo chmod a=,u=rwx ldconfig sudo chmod g=rsx man sudo chown man man sudo chown www-data modsecurity sudo mkdir ...


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It is working for me. --backups is a new option, for example my RHEL6.5 machines do not have it (wget 1.12), and my local Fedora machine does have it (wget 1.14). Have you tried a simple test without the other options? This is what works for me: >mkdir test; cd test >wget -q --backups=4 http://ddg.gg/ >ls index.html >wget -q --backups=4 ...


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I have been using btrfs send for backups, and found it to be workable, though with frequent failures. It's important to detect a failed send and delete any partial/corrupt received volumes. I have not had any corruption problems after a successful send. I've written a "sync" utility for btrfs snapshots that detects failures, and also includes a ...


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Note to myself and others: The solution I use now is aptly. From their website: aptly is a swiss army knife for Debian repository management: it allows to mirror remote repositories, manage local package repositories, take snapshots, pull new versions of packages along with dependencies, publish snapshots as Debian repositories. So far my experiences ...


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You could use debmirror in debmarshal mode which seems to keep snapshots of release of packages allowing you to rollback if necessary. Seems simple enough according to the wiki. If that's too complex, mirrors normally don't delete the packages when they are updated, so using a browser you should able to redownload the packages, if necessary. Also, apt keeps ...



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