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5

You could pipe through SSH. Example using dd: dd bs=1M if=/dev/disk | ssh -C target dd bs=1M of=disk.img If the network connection breaks during transfer, you can resume if you know how much was copied. For example if you're sure at least 1000MiB were transferred already (check the file size of disk.img): dd bs=1M skip=1000 if=/dev/disk | ssh -C target ...


3

In the long description of the many variants of how to include and exclude files, there seems to be one most important sentence: A given file is excluded by the file selection system exactly when the first matching file selection condition specifies that the file be excluded. According to this, you need an include option for the files you want first, so ...


2

Whenever you change the /etc/shadow file with the vipw or similar command, it saves the previous copy as /etc/shadow- . This is not a backup. It's simply an instant-mistake fixer.


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I'd install the buffer program (if it is not already there in your distribution) if you are trying to transfer via an ethernet link. It is like dd but FAR better and faster. Basically it is programmed to do concurrent reads and writes using a shared memory buffer. I used to use this for tape dumps and it saved about 10% transfer time. The command line ...


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Rsync on its own supports incremental backup. You can use the '-i' option to view the changes between source & destination directory. Usage would be; rsync -avzi root@hostip:/var/big /root/tmp


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To avoid these kinds of issues the normal sysadmin approach is to separate each backup from the others. A simple way to do this is to save the data into a single file with the current date or timestamp in the name. tar can do this easily: tar -cf "/backups/$(date +%Y%m%dT%H%M%S).tar" /some/path If it's easily compressible data (such as text files) you can ...


1

I think rsnapshot will be ideal for you. It uses rsync, will make incremental differential backups of your home directory, so that you can get back to data backed-up a while (for instance week) ago. It will not copy whole every time but only what has changed. Easy to setup, all commandline. HTH, Cheers


1

The cat command is not going to much, because none of the 5 files you list matches the sda1.ext4-ptcl-img.gz.a* pattern. To get the image from sda1.ext3-ptcl-img.gz.aa you can probably do just cat sda1.ext3-ptcl-img.gz.aa | gzip -d > sda1.img Without a wildcard. AFAIK Clonezilla always "number" the files as it doesn't know up front in all cases if ...


1

If you restore on top of a fresh installation, you need to be careful to delete files that aren't being restored. Using rsync --delete during restoration will take care of that. However, if you're going to use a live CD to restore, it may be easier to do the following: Back up a complete image of your boot partition (cat /dev/sda1 >boot.image). ...


1

I've been using "btrfs send" for backups for a while. It does not handle resuming broken transfers. I've written a utility that does resume transfers, and automatically syncs snapshots in the local btrfs file system to Amazon S3. You're welcome to try it out to see if it helps, and I'd love any feedback! It's both on GitHub ...


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I know this is an old question, but I recently had the same problem, so I'll provide a solution hoping it'll help someone out there. It's really easy - use the --force flag. duplicity --force file:///home/user/Backup / This will probably not only restore missing files to the directories you've backed up, but also replace newer versions of backed up files ...


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It is retained as a copy of /etc/shadow and created upon changes. Nothing to configure there.


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I don't know why you want to use ziped files for your backup. If you use rsync, you will be able to only backup new and changed files (removed files is not affected). Example: #!/bin/bash # see http://ss64.com/bash/rsync_options.html DROPBOX=~/Dropbox/ BACKUP=~/dropboxbackup rsync -rvt $DROPBOX $BACKUP The flags: r - recursive v - verbose t - ...


1

You should use crontab Example: If you wished to have a script named tarBackup.sh run every day at 5am, your crontab entry would look like as follows. First, install your cronjob by running the following command: crontab -e Append the following entry: 0 5 * * * xterm -e /path/to/tarbackup.sh Save and close the file. Your tarBackup.sh Your ...



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