Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

You can simply place code in a separate file and include it with dofile("somefile.lua") Note: The working directory is $HOME. To specify a file relative to rc.lua you can use dofile(awful.util.getdir("config") .. "/" .. "somefile.lua") If it's more than just some code and it might be used by others as well, it might make sense to create a lua module ...


8

You can set up a compose key for all sorts of different key sequences. There are specific instructions for Ubuntu, but they assume that you are running a Desktop Environment like Gnome or Xfce. If you are using awesome as a standalone window manager, you can set a compose key in your .xinitrc file like so (this example uses the right Alt key): setxkbmap ...


7

By default there is no such key binding. But you can create one. Use this snippet (or better add the key binding to your existing configuration) for your rc.lua file: clientkeys = awful.util.table.join( awful.key({ modkey }, "F7", function(c) c.maximized_horizontal = not c.maximized_horizontal end), awful.key({ modkey }, "F8", function(c) ...


7

From man awesome there doesn't seem to be a default key binding to close all windows of an application. It might be possible to manually add such a binding. There is, however, a default key binding to close the one focused window: Mod4-Shift-c. This will leave other windows (if any) of the application intact.


7

awesome is in the repositories, so sudo apt-get install awesome fonts-font-awesome awesome-extra For additional information see http://laputa.io/blog/2012/09/02/using-awesome-in-ubuntu-12.04/ , http://www.neowin.net/forum/topic/901758-how-to-awesome-wm-with-debianubuntu/ and the awesome documentation http://awesome.naquadah.org/wiki/Main_Page ...


6

You could use xautolock: Xautolock monitors console activity under the X window system, and fires up a program of your choice if nothing happens during a user configurable period of time. You can use this to automatically start up a screen locker in case you tend to forget to do so manually before having a coffee break. Something along the lines of: ...


6

In addition to the Compose key, you can also set up a key to select the so-called ‘third level’ by selecting one of the ‘international’ keyboard layouts. On Debian, I use ‘English (international AltGr dead keys)’. On PC keyboards, AltGr is actually meant for this purpose, and X likes to assign it to the third level shift by default. You can also do this ...


6

Gnome provides services (such as Gnome keyring, GConf, PolicyKit integration, etc.) that some programs use as well as additional features like theme application and application autostarting. If you use programs that make use of those services and you don't have Gnome, you may miss out on some functionality. Depending on what you use, it might be critical, or ...


6

Xwrits works with Awesome. It's a simple command line program. Here's an example for a five-minute break with screen lock every 55 minutes: xwrits breaktime=5:00 typetime=55:00 +mouse +lock


5

To move code into a different file, you create a module and require the module in the rc.lua. To create a module, you simply call module (name [, ···]) in the script that has the code you pulled out of the original script. Lua reference - module. To use the module you created, you just call require (modname). Lua reference - require. There is an excellent ...


5

Tags in awesome are not monolithic slates or work-spaces that could be "scrolled to". In general you have to re-think what you are looking at. Tags are not separately rendered spaces, they are lists of windows. This is part of the flexibility of awesome and allows you to do things other window managers cannot, such as pull up more than one tag at once - ...


5

You would do this via Xmodmap and not via your window manager. This is directly related to your keyboard layout/keymap and not your window manager. To change your xmodmap create a file named ~/.Xmodmap and add the following content. This should allow you to to type üäöß directly with altgr+u keysym a = a A adiaeresis Adiaeresis keysym o = o O odiaeresis ...


5

I couldn't make the viewidx method working but I ended up doing the following, which worked: awful.key({ modkey, }, "a", function () local screen = mouse.screen if tags[screen][10] then awful.tag.viewonly(tags[screen][10]) end end),


4

I am not sure if you have created the string following xrandr --newmode by yourself or have you copied it from somewhere else, but it won't work in its current form. I recommend to do it step by step. First, you need to generate the new mode. I recommend using 60Hz with LCD or 85Hz with CRT monitor gtf 1280 1024 60 You will get something like: # ...


4

It's a bit tricky: You're right "plugin-container" looks quite like firefox. Unfortunately you cannot distinguish the newly spawned yt-client by "instance" since it's simply an empty string, which matches more clients than you want. I have found another way: The "class" property of that client is "Luakit" instead of "luakit" for normal luakit-clients. So ...


4

I have this problem as well. I think it's related to the bug herein: http://osdir.com/ml/blfs-support/2011-12/msg00059.html The problem seems to be related to specific functionality in gtk 3.0, likely related to resizing the window or making the resize grip appear: I've gotten this behavior when I use Meta-Mouse2 to resize in Awesome. I've also seen it ...


4

Your problem is that you are not defining the environment variable TZ in the right file. ~/.bashrc is the configuration file for interactive shells. It's the place for aliases, key bindings and other things that you want to have in interactive shell. While you can define an environment variable there, this variable will only be set in the programs that are ...


4

This is possible to do in several ways. In X11 Xmodmap is probably one of the easier ways, for a simple change like this. Wikipedia article about Irony punctuation: This character can be represented using the reversed question mark (⸮) found in Unicode as U+2E2E; another character approximating it is the Arabic question mark (؟), U+061F. Xmodmap ...


4

I recently solved this problem myself on Arch Linux. I used the program xss-lock from the AUR found here. I was trying to set up a service to lock the screen on sleep but for some reason I couldn't get it to work. I ended up using xss-lock and it worked very easily. Install xss-lock from the AUR. Add one of the commands below to your .xprofile or ...


3

I think I understand the why, but I don't have a complete fix. The behavior of SHLVL depends on the shell. In dash and ksh (both pdksh and ksh93), only interactive instances increment SHLVL. In bash and zsh, all instances increment SHLVL, even bash -c …. If you observed a change in behavior after this patch, it's likely that your /bin/sh is dash and your ...


3

This is a known issue. It looks like there is a patch that is in progress, but as of this writing has not yet been applied to any Linux distributions.


3

Yes and yes. The applets in question are just front-ends to basic OS processes. They just provide a graphical interface to the system tools so there should be no real difference between them. Mind you, some applets will be better than others so you might find missing functionality there but that's just because whoever wrote the applet did not include it not ...


3

You are looking for (unsurprisingly) awesome.client.cycle. Add this to your rc.lua: awful.key({ modkey, "Shift" }, "y", function () awful.client.cycle(true) end) Then you can press Alt+Shift+y to get the desired behavior. The lone boolean parameter determines cycle direction.


3

I prefer using the Compose key system, I've just checked and it seems I've had Compose-/-? (and Compose-?-/) set to output U+2E2E for some time now (? reflected off the /) My .XCompose file looks like this: # # add in the original stuff (what's usually there) include "%L" # # Compose key sequences # # generate PI char <Multi_key> <p> <i> ...


3

Add to ~/.config/gtk-3.0/gtk.css: .window-frame { box-shadow: none; margin: 0; } (via https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?pid=1416334#p1416334) I had to restart X for it to take effect - SIGHUP awesome was not sufficient.


2

About AwesomeWM, from its FAQ: You should use keycodes, instead of keynames, like this: Run xev. Press "Print" key. Read the output KeyPress event, serial 34, synthetic NO, window 0x1200002, root 0x291, subw 0x0, time 1510129, (471,293), root:(472,316), state 0x0, keycode **107** (keysym 0xff61, Print), same_screen YES, ... Create ~/screenshots, install ...


2

The mouse grab when clicking on any empty area in the title/menu bar in nautilius/evince/gnome-terminal/etc. happens for me on Ubuntu 11.10 / libgtk-3-0 3.2.0-0ubuntu6 / awesome 3.4.10-1 as well. A killall nautilus or so on the console releases the mouse grab; with Nautilus, just closing the window with a Meta-c does not help. There seems to be a fix for ...


2

Use the source, which reads (excerpt) for line in io.lines("/proc/diskstats") do local device, read, write = -- Linux kernel documentation: Documentation/iostats.txt string.match(line, "([^%s]+) %d+ %d+ (%d+) %d+ %d+ %d+ (%d+)") disk_lines[device] = { read, write } end [...] -- Calculate and store I/O helpers.uformat(disk_usage, ...


2

To have a window not appear in the tasklist, you have to set skip_taskbar to true for the client. As you want to do that for specific applications, probably the best way is to add a client rule to your rc.lua: awful.rules.rules = { { rule = { class = {"Gajim","Skype"} }, properties = { skip_taskbar = true } }, -- other rules ... } You ...


2

I happened to stumble upon this issue from time to time. Usually, I simply maximize the (small) player window using mod + M while the video is playing. Although this is only a workaround and does not fix the issue (it never annoyed me enough to dig deeper).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible