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1

Look at that, I figured it out. Turns out I had to change mongod.conf to enable authentication. For those who are coming here in the future, add the following to /etc/mongod.conf: security: authorization: enabled


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It's known: NIS can use DES (where the short passwords are seen) or other formats which support longer passwords. Further reading: AJ's Open Source, openSUSE and SUSE Ramblings Migration of NIS yppasswd hashes from crypt to md5 Are passwords on modern Unix/Linux systems still limited to 8 characters?


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Yes, look at the contents of /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.md5sums. Strictly speaking this isn't handled by dpkg; these checksums are generated at build-time (typically by dh_md5sums) and included in the binary packages. You can check that the installed files still match their MD5 checksums using the debsums command.


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There is no special mechanism in ssh to notify you that you use some key. It works or fails. Differentiate the keys using passphrase Only other idea that comes to my mind is differentiate between the keys using passphrase. For example, have the RSA keys in ssh-agent or without passphrase and the DSA one with passphrase (and not in ssh-agent). It might ...


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Make sudo read password from stdin ssh -t user@host "echo yourpassword | sudo -S tcpdump ....."


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On a technical level, there's no way to tell that the string a program is requesting will be used as a password. On the other hand, there are kdesu and gksudo which are, to a first approximation, "sudo but with a popup window for the password".



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