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Somewhat similar to @user37161's answer. If the shared account is running a custom shell and the shell needs to know what user is there, then running the "wrapper" script might not be sufficient, since information there isn't passed into the custom shell except through methods that could cause race conditions. Instead you can use the environment= option in ...


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I've figured out what's going on. The messages are coming to the server from remote hosts via UDP. I didn't notice the host field changing at first, my mistake. BTW, actually there is a possibility to login using public key authentication with no authorized_keys file involved. RedHat (and variants) have a supported patch for OpenSSH that adds the ...


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Have you tried mod-auth external, it allows you to do your custom authentication mechanism for Apache. It gives you access to environment variables such as IP, USER, PASS, etc. You can write a script in a language that you are familiar with and go fetch the authentication data from your database. The wiki has some examples. If you build a custom ...


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First As I know apache/HTTP authentication don't gives you control. After first authentication, your server cannot instruct the browser to logout or timeout, because HTTP authentication doesn't work with session/cookies and the browser will continuously send authentication credentials. To logout you should close the browser. but looking in Apache webpage: ...


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It's quite easy for "publickey->password->your_module" or "password->your_module". Can't find the way to remove password from the first chain publickey,keyboard-interactive - means that publickey auth will be used and keyboard-interactive after that (kind of logical AND), replace comma with space for logical OR, like AuthenticationMethods ...


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Yes, it's normal. The root user can do anything (including, say, changing a user's password, logging in as them, and changing it back), so they aren't restricted by su (or sudo). That includes password prompts and any other restrictions. The PAM configuration can be set up to have su present certain prompts to the root user still, for example encryption ...


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The .htaccess file modifies apache settings based on the file system location, where you want to change settings based on the virtual host context. So instead of setting up authentication in the .htaccess file, modify the Apache configuration file and add authentication settings to the correct virtual host entry: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerName ...



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