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1

So the solution was, change the /etc/passwd file for user1's shell from /usr/bin/bash into /bin/bash


0

As you get the slow down after login, technically, you need to check what can happen between login and the first shell prompt. A custom setup of the shell could do a lot of creative things that can fail in miserable ways under some special conditions - like at login before actually entering interactive mode, or while DISPLAY is not yet defined. In this ...


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As a general way to investigate a slow authentication, check /etc/pam.conf and /etc/pam.d/su (and /etc/pam.d/sshd etc.) to see what kind of authentication the login services perform. Check the system logs to see if anything is logged (look for log entries dating from the time of the authentication). In your case, it's the kernel logs that reveal the ...


3

The following method works: ssh -o PreferredAuthentications=password host.example.org


1

Technically the default is that sshd does not use PAM. From the sshd_config manpage: UsePAM Enables the Pluggable Authentication Module interface. [...] The default is ``no'' But this option is almost universally enabled by SSH installations by OS distributions and default config files and such. You can check if it's enabled in /etc/ssh/sshd_config if ...


1

On CentOS there is /var/log/secure. This holds the fingerprints of the logins: Aug 7 23:12:57 my-server sshd[2584]: Accepted publickey for user from 192.168.1.156 port 58279 ssh2: RSA 32:f1:aa:aa:aa:aa:aa:aa:bb:be:ef:c3:aa:bb:cc:f8 Map these back to the keys and you have the info you need. You can get the key fingerprints by doing: ssh-keygen -l -f ...


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I had this problem when I inadvertently entered an incorrect password for my Google account. I resolved it by opening Seahorse (Passwords & Keys), finding the entry for GOA google credentials... and DELETING it. I then logged in to GNOME again and opened Online Accounts. I signed in to my Google account with the correct password and that was it.


2

Open the file /etc/ssh/sshd_config and change the next line: PermitRootLogin without-password with: PermitRootLogin yes Finally, reboot the server.


0

Somewhat similar to @user37161's answer. If the shared account is running a custom shell and the shell needs to know what user is there, then running the "wrapper" script might not be sufficient, since information there isn't passed into the custom shell except through methods that could cause race conditions. Instead you can use the environment= option in ...


1

I've figured out what's going on. The messages are coming to the server from remote hosts via UDP. I didn't notice the host field changing at first, my mistake. BTW, actually there is a possibility to login using public key authentication with no authorized_keys file involved. RedHat (and variants) have a supported patch for OpenSSH that adds the ...


4

Have you tried mod-auth external, it allows you to do your custom authentication mechanism for Apache. It gives you access to environment variables such as IP, USER, PASS, etc. You can write a script in a language that you are familiar with and go fetch the authentication data from your database. The wiki has some examples. If you build a custom ...



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