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I also had this problem... and I finally decided to fix it. I also did what polym suggested and found that I had three entries for 'google credentials'. Specifically: Open seahorse (Passwords and Keys) Select 'Login' under 'Passwords' In the search window type 'gnome' Delete all entries that begin with 'GOA google credentials for identity ...


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I would definitely say this sounds like a bug. My suggestion, if you're going to use xscreensaver allow it to handle power management. At the command line type xscreensaver-demo, and in the GUI go to the Advanced tab and make sure 'Power Management Enabled' is checked (also tweak the settings how you'd like them to be). As well, start xscreensaver from the ...


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@DavidAlpert's advice was correct. I fixed this by simply entering my domain credentials (username, then password) 3 or 4 times in a row. I don't know why, but it worked for me! I repeated this as an answer here since it is easy to miss in the comments.


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There are many ways, here are a couple of easy ones: in /etc/ssh/sshd_config change PermitRootLogin to no (this is usually a good idea, then rely on su/sudo for administration). This affects SSH only of course. in the various PAM configuration files use the pam_listfile module to explicitly allow or deny certain accounts (needs to be done for each service) ...


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So the answer... oh the answer. The culprit was the shadow password file. Even though we have LDAP we don't use it for replacing the passwd file entries. I've been working with upgrading our LDAP servers and making it so we don't need passwd file entries. So I am the only one without a passwd entry. This seems to work in most cases, but apparently there are ...


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Why don't you just relax having to put the password in, by altering sudo's behavior, like so: This was taken from the ChromiumOS Tips and Tricks Page: Making Sudo A Little More Permissive cd /tmp cat > ./sudo_editor <<EOF #!/bin/sh echo Defaults \!tty_tickets > \$1 # Entering your password in one shell affects all shells echo ...


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If it is feasible to enable the root account on your Ubuntu system, you can configure sudo to prompt for the root password instead of the password of the invoking user by adding the following to /etc/sudoers (using visudo): Defaults rootpw Ubuntu, by default, disables the root account by locking out its password. To enable it simply set a new password for ...


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Keep an shell open, where you have used sudo -i, the interactive mode. Everytime you need to do something as root, do it inside this shell. Then you could also re-run more then once needed commands by searching them via [STRG] + R, f.e. updating: aptitude update && aptitude upgrade && aptitude dist-upgrade If its reasonable or practical ...


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You could tie sudo authentication to the knowledge of a secret key managed by ssh-agent. This can be achieved via PAM and the pam_ssh_agent_auth module. You can generate a separate keypair to use exclusively for sudo authentication. The password will be the passphrase used to encrypt the private key. To configure the pam_ssh_agent_auth module add the ...


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You can edit the file /etc/sudoers with your editor of choice or just execute visudo and add the line to allow your specific user to use the sudo command without password. Something like: user ALL = NOPASSWD : ALL



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