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1

Players employ caches to hide connectivity problems from the users; that's probably where the delay comes from. Check your player's settings to see if you can tweak the buffer size. As for ever-growing delay, it might be caused by lack of bandwidth. You should enable logging in your player and see if it ever pauses waiting for cache to fill. If it does, ...


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Here is a solution with Awk and FFmpeg: #!/bin/sh if [ "$#" != 1 ] then echo 'ff-split.sh [cue file]' exit fi awk ' $1 == "FILE" { split($0, i, /"/) file = i[2] } $1 == "TRACK" { tracks[++j] = $2 } $1 == "TITLE" && j { split($0, i, /"/) titles[j] = i[2] } $1 == "INDEX" && $2 { split($3, i, ":") indexes[j] = ...


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That was just because I didn't find a stylish way to post the output of a terminal, but here we go : my xinput : ⎡ Virtual core pointer id=2 [master pointer (3)] ⎜ ↳ Virtual core XTEST pointer id=4 [slave pointer (2)] ⎜ ↳ PixArt USB Optical Mouse id=8 [slave pointer (2)] ⎣ Virtual ...


2

The posters sound card was muted. He ran alsamixer, unmuted the mixer controls, and raised the levels. This got the card working. However, the card returned to muted on rebooting. The Alsa config should be saved and restored on rebooting. So this is an outstanding issue. NOTE: poster says he has no ~/.pulse. This should definitely be present. I enclose ...


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Use sox silence option: sox [input] [output] silence 1 1 2% -1 0.5 2% will trim silence at front to 1 second and reduce gaps to half a second in the file. 2% in my case ignores noise floor. 0% might work for you. -1 tells sox to deal to each instance.


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i had a simiar issue when i was using a display connected with HDMI. i manage to fix the sound issue after i created the .asoundrc with pcm.!default { type hw card 1 device 0 } ctl.!default { type hw card 1 device 0 } i got the above values from aplay -l And then i run : alsactl kill rescan and alsactl restore.


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The trick is to make the speaker or headphone state follow the state of the master channel depending on if you have the headphones plugged in or not. See my answer and modify the solution to your needs: http://askubuntu.com/a/757113/238987


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One solution is to use an external command: Open Preferences -> Sound For Method select "Command" from the drop-down. Enter a local program for the Sound Command, eg. "mplayer %s"


2

ffplay appears to only support a single input file, so you'll need to use code to loop over a list of input files (and possibly to shuffle them); wildly assuming coreutils (for shuf), perhaps something like: find musicdir -type f -name "*.mp3" | shuf | while read f; do ffplay -autoexit -- "$f"; done This will of course break horribly if there are spaces ...


1

GStreamer 0.10 is being removed from Debian, and xfce4-mixer depends on that. In fact xfce4-mixer hasn't been available in testing since last October... You'll need to wait for version 4.11, which is currently in experimental, to be uploaded to unstable then make its way to testing.


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as you use a testing branch of debian, probably there is a dependency conflict and some packages could not be resolved and are not installed. You should wait some day to see if it will be resolved by upstream developers. If it will not be resolved in short time, you could try to fill a bug report. a more complete error log may be more useful


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When you give an explicit file name, such as toto.wav, SoX will deduce from the .wav extension that it is supposed to use WAV format. In case of - being the output “file name”, that deduction can’t be done, so you have to specify the type explicitly with -t wav. The same would apply if you wanted to give the file a different extension (toto.sound) or none at ...


1

You need to declare the type of the sox output by adding -t wav before the second -. When it's a file name, sox peeps at the name and deduces the type from there, but when it's stdout, the type needs to be declared. You might also want to declare all other settings as well (-b 16 -e signed -c 1) rather than assuming they are transferred from the input; all ...


4

In the end: I will not exactly answer your question, but help is under way. You do need a program to generate the sounds. The command beep may help. And you may try to code all the details as this guy also tried using beep. Like sending a 1000 Hz tone for 2 seconds to the speaker (debug will show exactly what is being done): beep --debug -f 1000 -l 2000 ...



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