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3

Possibly sox would be an option. Invoked like this: sox sound.wav sound.dat it writes a textual representation of the sample data to the file sound.dat. Depending on the options you can get a file with the time since the beginning in the first column and a normalized sample volume in second column, e.g.: ; Sample Rate 44100 ; Channels 1 0 ...


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The kernel documentation describes bdl_pos_adj as follows (see ALSA-Configuration.txt and HD-Audio.txt): bdl_pos_adj - Specifies the DMA IRQ timing delay in samples. Passing -1 will make the driver to choose the appropriate value based on the controller chip. (sic). On Intel controllers, the default is 1 (which is ...


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Answer: @derobert pointed out the "sox" and "play" command are part of the same package but does different thing. The 3600 below is the time interval in seconds. sox -n note.mp3 synth 3600 sin 347 The above code will generate an hour long tone without playing it. play -n note.mp3 synth 3600 sin 347 The above code will play the tone for an hour AND ...


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Install the good old apetag, then do something like this: find /some/dir -iname '*.mp3' -exec apetag -i {} -m overwrite \; It's probably a good idea to make backups, and try the operation on a small subset of files first.


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You don't mount Audio CDs. You can read about it here Mount CD ROM in Linux at 4. Mounting Audio CD chapter. In order to listen to a music CD all what needs to be done is to insert music CD ( Compact Dics ) into CD-ROM/DVD-ROM drive and fire up you favorite music CD player. In order to listen to Audio CD you can refer to this article Mplayer: Play ...


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You could try to use these commands in the terminal: mkdir /mnt/cd && mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Else try this in the terminal: sudo mkdir /mnt/cd && sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Or, if mkdir works: mkdir /mnt/cd && sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd Or, if the directory has already been created: sudo mount /dev/cdrom /mnt/cd ...


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If you want/need to use sox for this you can use its trim command: for i in *.mp3 do sox "$i" sample-"$i" trim 0 10 done The splitting you can also do with the commandline utility that is part of mp3splt. You explicitly set the output file with -o, so the originals are not touched, just remove them after you are done with them. This allows you to ...


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You can enclose your command in a loop: for file in *.flac;do outfile="${file%.*}.png" sox "$file" -n spectrogram "$outfile" done As for file naming, the sox(1) man page seems to suggest you can explicitly name your output file on the command line so you can use that within the loop. The first line in the loop makes use of Bash's parameter ...


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On Gentoo I use PulseAudio's built-in equalizer. Any further info can be found here: https://wiki.gentoo.org/wiki/PulseAudio#Equalizer


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The other solution1 has some inconveniences: - it requires root access - it's a global change so it affects all users - upgrading sound-theme-freedesktop restores the file For the record, the proper way to do it (and avoid all of the above) is via a custom sound theme that disables2 the default sound file used by gnome-screenshot (the name of the file is ...



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