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sox — the Swiss Army knife of audio manipulation — is a program that can apply effects to audio. It usually takes as parameter one or more input files, an output file, and the effects to apply. It can also be invoked as rec or play, and then it uses the default sound device as input or output, respectively.


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In the good old times of ISA sound cards, it was not possible to create device nodes in /dev/ dynamically, so all devices had to be preallocated. This resulted in a limit of 8 sound cards, and the drivers were written with this limit in mind. Later, when devfs and USB were introduced, this limit was removed. However, the easiest way to do this was to make ...


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One other alternative is to use a MIDI router box with USB-MIDI and Ethernet (RTP-MIDI) interfaces. You attaches the USB connection to your linux machine just like any USB/MIDI interfaces. Then, data received on the virtual USB MIDI ports are forwarded to the opened RTP-MIDI sessions (and vice-versa) by the box. At least, one product (Cinara MidiGateway) is ...


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If your goal is specifically to pipe arbitrary data from a file to your sound card then your solution is solid. If your goal is simply to test that your sound works then I would recommend the command speaker-test. It plays static over a single channel by default. On Debian based systems it comes from the alsa-utils package.


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From my testing, aplay works: aplay <filename> When I did aplay test.html # a simple html file I got hissy static. aplay something.wav Played the music in the wav file. And in a bizarre twist, a file containing this: Fri Jan 13 08:20:01 CST 2012 Fri Jan 13 08:21:01 CST 2012 Fri Jan 13 08:22:01 CST 2012 Fri Jan 13 08:23:01 CST 2012 Fri Jan ...


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It does look like you're boosting your mic gain; that does make noise more pronounced. Also, you probably have too many mics active. You should methodically go through each capture option and mute it, and then unmute one-by-one until you identify the one you actually are using.


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Installing linux kernel 4.4.0 solved this problem. My device is Lenovo Ideapad 500S-14ISK, and uname -r -v is 4.4.0-trunk-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 4.4-1~exp1 (2016-01-19) now. I'll write everything I remember to install the kernel below, so other people with the same device could help themselves. Add the experimental repository to your sources.list. The ...


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This may be due to the pulseaudio-bluetooth-module package not being installed. Install it if it missing, then restart pulseaudio. pulseaudio -k pulseaudio --start If the issue is not due to the missing package, the problem in this case is that PulseAudio is not catching up. A common solution to this problem is to restart PulseAudio. Note that it is ...


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If you have pulseaudio then you have the commands parec and pacat at your disposal for recording and play back. The option --rate of pacat allows you to change pitch.



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