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0

It easy can be done by adding less command to special variable LESS: LESS=+/-T man ls where /-T is less command /find -Tpattern


2

You can do that piping man though less and using the -p flag: -ppattern or --pattern=pattern The -p option on the command line is equivalent to specifying +/pattern; that is, it tells less to start at the first occurrence of pattern in the file. Examples: man ls | less -p -T man git-log | less -p -S Since you'll land ...


-2

cmd tty tty returns the name of the terminal connected to stdout.


3

If your shell supports them, the simplest way of doing such manipulations would be to use process substitution: <(…) and >(…). This works in bash, zsh and ksh and possibly other shells. For example: $ sort <(printf "b\nc\na\n") a b c $ ls foo $ cp <(find . -name foo) bar $ ls bar foo However, this won't help in the example you state since ...


-3

Or use a command substitution; this command is intrinsically redundant, but just to showcase the method: cat "$(<<< "files" sed 's/s//')" will cat a file named file in your current working directory.


11

From the pdftotext man page: If text-file is ´-', the text is sent to stdout. So in this case all you need is: pdftotext "C BY BRIAN W KERNIGHAN & DENNIS M RITCHIE.pdf" - Or if you want to pipe this to STDIN of another program: pdftotext "C BY BRIAN W KERNIGHAN & DENNIS M RITCHIE.pdf" - | another_prog Using - as substitute for a ...


13

If the said program supports to write to any file descriptor even if it can't seek, you can use /dev/stdout as output file which is a symlink to /proc/self/fd/1 on my system. File descriptor 1 is stdout.


-1

Yes, you should first check if there are any arguments or not and then proceed. if [ $# -gt 0 ] then for myvar do if ! [ -e "$myvar" ] echo "$myvar cannot be found." exit fi echo "This is the filname:" $myvar cut -f1 -d, $myvar > social_security cut -f2 -d, $myvar > ...


2

Think about the first line of your script: for myvar. How many times will this for loop be executed if there are no arguments?


2

I think there's more to this: Either that's not the command you're using - or else somewhere else in the function you're doing it differently. That error comes from ${1?}. Or it comes from your test, but only if you first do set -u. To fix that, stop doing that. Do set +u; fn_name, and see what happens. And if you have any ${1?} expansions in there, that ...


2

You need to separate the arguments to [ with spaces; also, the equality operator is a single =, and you should quote both sides: if [ "$ARG" = "clean" ]; then



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