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As with any performance tuning there are no absolute rules. Due to the nature of it, there are a few rules that you can make with sufficient qualification but only a few. So bear that in mind. How you should control for hardware interrupts really depends on how your workload behaves For your question, you also have to control where the interrupts are sent. ...


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The Linux kernel syscall API is the the primary API (though hidden under libc, and rarely used directly by programmers), and most standard IPC mechanisms are heavily biased toward the everything is a file approach, which eliminates them here as they ultimately require read/write (and more) calls. However, on most platforms (if you exclude all the system ...


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No. Trivial counter example, this will interact with the kernel: int main() { volatile char *silly = 0; *silly = 'a'; } That'll call the kernel's page fault handler, ultimately resulting in your process getting a SIGSEGV (presuming the compiler doesn't "optimize" that code to do something other than the obvious, since that's undefined behavior by ...


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The userland GUI stack begins with the Xorg server, which manages hardware -- both the display and input devices -- and provides the foundations of a windowing environment. It is a server whose clients are GUI applications that appear in a window. I believe the name was originally derived from one of the original X shaped cursors (but treat that as ...


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(I'll try to be brief.) In theory, there are two dimensions of privileges: The computer's instruction set architecture (ISA), which protects certain information and/or functions of the machine. The operating system (OS) creating an eco-system for applications and communication. At its core is the kernel, a program that can run on the ISA with no ...


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Root and non root privileges are all user space related things. For example, a root user can install an application and an ordinary user can't. However, even the root user has some limitations. Those limitations are imposed by the design of the operating system do differentiate between user space and kernel space. For example, even dough you are a root ...


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A daemon is just an application. From the Wikipedia article. In multitasking computer operating systems, a daemon (/ˈdeɪmən/ or /ˈdiːmən/)1 is a computer program that runs as a background process, rather than being under the direct control of an interactive user. Traditionally daemon names end with the letter d: for example, syslogd is the daemon that ...


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Where do application layer protocols reside? Protocols are an abstraction, so they don't really "reside" anywhere beyond specifications and other documentation. If you mean, where are they implemented, there's a few common patterns: They may be implemented first in native C as libraries which can be wrapped by for use in other languages (since most ...


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It's unusual to use sudo on a Debian system. So it might just have been a permissions problem. Next time try adminstrator account via su



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