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1

It looks like pacaur supports --noconfirm: --noconfirm do not prompt for any confirmation The following may also be useful: --noedit do not prompt to edit files


0

There is a script that’s part of the pacman package called bacman that recreates a package using the pacman database and the files on your system. Note however that such an approach should only be used as a last resort, as, for one, the package will quite possibly be different due to modifications to the files after installation.


0

You could force install qassel from the repos/aur, which should overwrite the source installed files and then remove the package, assuming stuff got installed to /usr and not /usr/local. For future reference, learn to write PKGBUILD buildscripts and use them to do from source installs, this results in a pacman package that you can install and remove more or ...


0

Once you install a package manager and begin to use it (plus repos), lfs basically ceases to be lfs and becomes the distro using that package manager and repos. What here is your goal in using lfs? If you want special self-built packages/kernel, you may as well install arch linux and then build those packages with makepkg and/or write your own PKGBUILD for ...


2

This is a known error in Samsung SSDs. The drives do not properly implement queued trim commands. However, Ubuntu (and probably most other Linux distributions) now implement trim as a cronjob to improve performance, so this is not of any concern. For more details, see the kernel bug on this: https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=72341 The reason it ...


0

Checked all for all warnings, no issues. After the third try, got the magic login prompt! Still not sure what the initial issue was, but I suspect it was something to do with a corrupt boot partition.


0

That's pretty much all archlinux is with the bare bones install. Want a de? Install it yourself. Web browser? The same. Archlinux is beautiful in that it avoids shoving a bunch of crap on your machine that you might remove anyways. The base installed gives you just enough to have a bootable, usable system. After that, you're free to add whatever you want.


1

Something is obviously wrong with the installation. Perhaps you're ignoring an important warning? Make a full console log of the installation process, adding df and ls root before umount boot root. Analize each warning you see, add warnings you don't understand to your post. If there are no warnings during installation, check the output of dmesg, mount, df ...


8

You can do this with systemd, so you don't have to install extra software and just have a small amount of extra configuration. Simply add noauto,x-systemd.automount to the options in fstab. noauto to not mount automatically on boot and x-systemd.automount to let systemd mount it on access. Source: ArchWiki - fstab


16

autofs can do this for you. You can configure any number of mountpoints with various options, and the corresponding filesystems are mounted whenever the mountpoint is accessed. After a given amount of inactivity the filesystems are unmounted again. There are no doubt various ways of using autofs, but here's one way of doing what you're trying to do, based ...


0

Most display managers let the user choose a session type when logging in. The primitive xdm doesn't but more recent ones such as gdm, kdm, lightdm, etc. do. There's a directory, usually either under /etc/X11 or under the display manager's configuration directory, that records session names with the program associated with each name. Under Arch, the location ...


7

From the btrfs gotchas page: Files with a lot of random writes can become heavily fragmented (10000+ extents) causing trashing on HDDs and excessive multi-second spikes of CPU load on systems with an SSD or large amount a RAM. On servers and workstations this affects databases and virtual machine images. The nodatacow mount option may be ...


0

Searching a bit more around the web, In this archlinux forum post is said restarting, and it worked. I just wonder why it did...


0

Finaly I've found what was wrong. I didn't have polish language enabled in KDE's control panel. systemsettings -> input devices -> keyboards -> layouts


0

It was quite counterintuitive for me, but reinstalling sudo and editing sudoers file helped.


0

You must not log in as root user. Either way, go to /usr/share/applications. There should be the .desktop file, copy it to your desktop or when you want and modify the line Exec with the order you want to execute. Then you just have to run chromium clicking on this file (you can use it like a desktop shortcut or a panel icon). If you want, you can also ...


0

mplayer doesn't support the HTTPS protocol. So you should use mplayer in conjunction with youtube-dl to download the video in a framebuffer then play it. Like this: curl --ciphers RC4-SHA "$(youtube-dl -g http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEVlyP4_11M)" | mplayer -


0

As others have said there are many parts of a system that can be affected including the memory bandwidth, and these other parts of the system will also have their own scheduling and priorities. You could always use chrt -i 0 to give the compilation true idle priority. http://linux.die.net/man/1/chrt Or throttle the compilation using cgroups. ...


-1

Code is not normally run within a cron. Create a file echo.cron, set mode to 0500, and then use this in your crontab: * * * * * echo.cron


0

You can enable the 'Utility:Inotify' Plugin and edit ~/.config/compiz/Default.ini As you can see, the <Primary> is not written to the ini-file. You can now write <Control>. The shortcut is active when the file is saved. example: [core] as_toggle_window_maximized_key = <Alt><Super>m as_toggle_window_maximized_horizontally_key = ...


0

According to this article to solve your problem you may add next lines to your /etc/polkit-1/rules.d/XX.rules polkit.addRule(function(action, subject) { if (action.id == 'org.freedesktop.udisks2.filesystem-mount-system' && subject.user == '%username%') { return polkit.Result.YES; } } ); replace %username% with the ...


1

It's possible, although it's not a good idea to mix package management systems... An Arch package is an xz-compressed tarball containing the package's files and some meta-data, stored in .PKGINFO, .INSTALL and .MTREE. To extract a package, simply run tar xf on it in a temporary directory; if you then decide you want to install the contents you can move them ...


0

The problem was rather simple, I needed to select Analog Stereo Duplex to get the mic and speakers working for things like Skype calls.


0

Stupid me. SD-Card reader has to be set enabled in BIOS.


0

I think that you should configure kdump for your machine so that whenever a panic occurs you will get a vmcore (vmcore is a snapshot of the running kernel at the time when panic occurred). Please follow below steps to configure a kdump kernel : configuring kdump - Link1 configuring kdump - Link2 To check the generated core files you need to use crash ...


0

I think your best bet is to make the apache document root a local directory on the same server that apache is running on. Then, if you must get content over a mount, use symlinks from within the doc root. The only way I have actually used this kind of setup is pulling static content from over the mount. If you are trying to reach across the mount, execute ...


3

The self maintenance method is to vacuum the logs by size or time. Retain only the past two days: journalctl --vacuum-time=2d Retain only the past 500 MB: journalctl --vacuum-size=500M man journalctl for more information.


0

The problem why I was not getting sound was pulseaudio was not running in background. The reason I didn't know that because pulseaudio was supposed to start automatically on startup, but it didn't.After I started pulseaudo by pulseaudio --start I started getting sound. Now I have to add pulseaudio to startup list to get sound every time I start my computer. ...


0

cfdisk only writes the MBR of your disk, it doesn't wipe the rest of the disk. If you layout your new partitions to start at the same location as the start of partitions previously your installer might detect that. From what you describe you either previously had some swap space where you wanted a ext4 partition to reside, or maybe you had the partition ...


0

If you're using UEFI you can select the boot manager directly from the firmware. Additionally, you can install os-prober to search for other operating systems and update the Arch grub configuration.


0

Apparently these kinds of programs (desktops, window managers, etc.) have methods to detect screen resolution and adapt accordingly. So if I were you, I wouldn't be worried. What I would be actually worried about is some text/elements in programs being too small to see. I've heard issues like these.


0

I am not an xmonad expert and do not have any experience with high DPI displays but I can imagine that if high-DPI does not cause problems in Gnome, you can safely assume that xmonad will also play nicely. The rationale is that the applications all look the same, the only difference is that there's no icons (not true if you use dzen2 or similar but I think ...


3

The problem here is that by default Arch boots up with kernel modesetting for the display (and console), using the open source nouveau driver. It seems that the driver included in this kernel doesn't support your graphics chipset, and rather than fallback, it simply gives you no console display. To disable kernel modesetting you can edit the boot options in ...


3

It is printed to the journal. You can read it with journalctl | grep Suspend: Mar 31 15:28:29 Shiv systemd[1]: Started Suspend.


2

Make can read a makefile from stdin, so you can give it a here document that is a makefile. The following is a makefile that includes your kernel makefile and adds a new wildcard target, %.var, whose recipe will output the value of the given make variable. (This assumes you don't have any files or other targets that end in .var, of course). showvar() { make ...


4

If you need just simple things like your example, just grep them out of the Makefile. For more complicated things, GNU Make has a -p option which prints the database after running Make, which includes all the variable definitions (and a lot more). You can use it together with -n, which causes the actions to not actually run (so nothing gets built). You can ...


2

You may try to extract the values with grep and sed. For example: filename="$HOME/kernelbuild/linux-3.14.37/Makefile" version=$(grep -m 1 VERSION $filename | sed 's/^.*= //g') This greps for first occurrence of "VERSION" in Makefile


1

DAD is inherently slow because it has to work without feedback. The way DAD works is that before an address is activated on an interface, a neighbor discovery request is sent asking for the MAC address of the host which has that IP address. If the address is duplicated the host which already has the address will respond, and DAD will fail quickly. But ...


1

In the end, the solution to alleviating the choppiness was removing pulseaudio (and pulseaudio-alsa, and configuring alsa correctly, for which I used asoundconf, and rebooting).


0

Instead of relying on the package manager to keep track of the explicitly installed packages, you could use a configuration management tool like Ansible on your system. I use that for my own few machine and I always can set up a machine just like my main machine with just two commands.


0

Either there is a software problem or the hardware can't handle it. I cannot tell from your question. Anyways, I'm going to give you some generic advice which hopefully should work. Debug PulseAudio/Choppiness fix Edit /usr/local/etc/pulse/daemon.conf as root. There should be lines that read #default-fragments = 8 and #default-fragment-size-msec = 5. ...


5

You can change this behaviour if you edit secure tmp option in /lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service. systemctl stop mariadb next edit /lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service as you change PrivateTmp to false: # Place temp files in a secure directory, not /tmp PrivateTmp=false # default is true and finally: systemctl daemon-reload systemctl start mariadb ...


1

There is an old script which does a really good job; it is called safepac. What does it do and how does it work? The way I usually update Arch is to read the news and then do pacman -Syu, or to just do pacman -Syu and if anything goes wrong, read the news. Now this script does nothing else: It gets the latest news entries from the RSS feed, does ...


1

Yes, some editors will basically delete the old file with the new edited file. Thus the owner is the one that made the edit and the group would be your primary group. However, you enforce the group on files under the directory by changing the directory permissions using chmod g+s . .... this will cause any newly created file to be in the same group as ...


3

In UNIX, only root can change the owner of files. As a consequence, we can conclude that the owner of the file is not changing when you edit it. Instead what must be happening is that your editor is writing out the edited contents into a new file and replacing the old file with the new one. Because it is a brand new file, the file ends up being tagged with ...


0

This may be a duplicate of this just asked differently. Anyways, have you tried to find out if another process is using the camera(such as one of your previous attempts to use the camera not exiting properly...) Try this - (notice you have to take the output of the first line and edit the third line to match your output... sudo fuser /dev/video0 ...



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