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1

There is a hook for mkinitcpio that you can include to ensure btrfs device scan will run during boot before root filesystem is mount. You can include this hook by modifying /etc/mkinitcpio.conf, search for the line HOOKS and put btrfs in front of udev. After modification be sure to regenerate initramfs by mkinitcpio -p linux The Arch Wiki actually ...


0

Files under /usr are meant to be under the control of the package manager (except for files under /usr/local). Configuration files that the system administrator may modify live in /etc. This is part of the traditional unix directory structure and codified for Linux in the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard. The recommendation in the Arch Wiki to edit files under ...


1

I did some more research for you and here is what I found - the key to autocompletion is the bash command complete. You can print the rules for vim using: complete -p vim Likewise you can remove these specific rules with: complete -r vim This command resets it to defaults - the usual paths and file names completion without any extra logic. That's ...


3

dmenu doesn't have built in logging, but it is a very simple program and it is not difficult to have it log it's output to a file. First, determine where pacman has placed the dmenu files with pacman -Ql dmenu. You should get: dmenu /usr/ dmenu /usr/bin/ dmenu /usr/bin/dmenu dmenu /usr/bin/dmenu_path dmenu /usr/bin/dmenu_run ... You can then open ...


0

Perhaps could you reinstall bash-completion : apt-get install --reinstall bash-completion And have a look at file /etc/bash.bashrc : nano /etc/bash.bashrc And verify that the following line are well uncommented: if ! shopt -oq posix; then if [ -f /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion ]; then . /usr/share/bash-completion/bash_completion elif [ ...


1

Bash by defaults autocompletes only path and file names. However the mechanism is extensible and bash can be taught to perform different autocompletion for different programs. For example for git it can autocomplete the sub-command names (clone, commit) and revisions instead of just pathnames. Sometimes it's handy, sometimes quite annoying - for example when ...


2

As with most things in Arch, there isn't a default time management tool set up; you can choose between several time synchronisation options. Give the RaspberryPi's lack of a RTC, I would suggest that you ensure that you use a tool that can store the last time to disk and then references that at boot time to pull the clock out of the dawn of UNIX time. ...


0

I recommend asoundconf, which will take care of generating a proper .asoundrc . List the available sound cards: asoundconf list Set the default one: asoundconf set-default-card PARAMETER Unmute it if necessary through either alsamixer(ncurses) or amixer (cli)


2

Your question was a little lacking in details, so I can only answer part of your question. When you post the logs from your terminal, I can answer the rest. How can I force the db to be updated? Passing the -yy switch to pacman forces it to refresh the DBs from the internet, even if they're not out of date. Use e.g. pacman -Syyu to update your system ...


1

Wayne's own answer is quite old by now. Arch has since switched to using systemd instead of init scripts. The Arch wiki's Avahi page has been updated and contains details on why the steps below are needed. In short: Avahi is a zeroconf tool, meaning itself needs no configuration to work once installed on all machines your LAN, but you must configure the rest ...


2

libcurl does not support the rsync protocol. From the libcurl FAQ: Section 3.21 3.21 Protocol xxx not supported or disabled in libcurl When passing on a URL to curl to use, it may respond that the particular protocol is not supported or disabled. The particular way this error message is phrased is because curl doesn't make a distinction ...


0

As peterph noted, anything. A t2.micro EC2 instance would cover it and set you back about $110 USD a year (down to around $60 if you reserve it.


0

first, stop apache before editing this file with this: /etc/init.d/apache stop then, if you are trying to log in as root, you should have the following lines in your config: $cfg['Servers'][$i]['user'] = 'root';# add this line $cfg['Servers'][$i]['AllowNoPasswordRoot'] = true; finally, start apache again: /etc/init.d/apache start


0

Nevermind, figured it out: Problem was, I already had brought the respective interface up ifconfig wlan0 up which prevents the job from working. Info was obtained by running netctl status wlan0-ROUTENZUG


2

I have had this problem take a look here kaslnetwork.com/articles/making-ugly-fonts-pretty-in-arch-linux. P.S.: Adding as formal answer after confirmation from the asker.


-1

Before I go too far, study the Pictorial Linux Timeline To understand the differences in Package Managers, you must understand the philosophies of the the OS'es pictured above Three Major Parents Redhat, Now Fedora - Package Manger - RPM, short for Redhat Package Manager, command line rpm Slackware - Package Manager - tgz, ordinary zipped files. ...


0

When i look at the latest commit of 3.6.y (https://github.com/raspberrypi/linux/tree/rpi-3.6.y) these files are present - try downloading the source again or check the permissions on the files. When i compiled my last kernel on Debian i had to move the source directory to /usr/src/rpi-kernel for some reason, but i could not get it to work in my home ...


5

This has more to do with systemd rather than the kernel, and in short, it means you just had a clean shutdown. See here : https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=174495 .


4

It sound slike one of your systems is configured to treat the hardware clock as localtime, while the other one treats it as UTC. Ubuntu docs leave me to believe Ubuntu is UTC by default, so probably your Arch isn't. You can check and set this by checking if timedatectl status | grep local returns anything, and set Arch to use UTC by saying timedatectl ...


0

You might run a command such as /sbin/hdparm -t /dev/sda1 as root to try to see if there is some problem with your disk read speed.  You might experiment with different values in the file /sys/power/image_size, which affects the bytes allocated for the image when suspending to disk.


3

The Archbang project don't have a central code repository, so it is difficult to establish what the current state is, however, it appears that there is an option in the Archbang ISO to bypass sections of the installer. This directory should have been removed in the script but, for whatever reason, in your case it failed to do that. You can remove the ...


-3

This is by no means a complete or exhaustive answer - the posters before me already gave some very good points, I'd just like to add my 2 cents. Another thing - I never really got used to apt/dpkg. It always seemd over-complex to me, I'm really most comfortable with yum/rpm. pacman is very easy to use, which is a pro and a con - you can learn to use it ...


3

What you mean by GNOME auto starting is, most likely, actually gdm (GNOME Display Manager) which provides the login screen. Just disable the service to stop it from autostarting. Arch uses systemd, so you want to do: # systemctl disable gdm Reboot and gdm won't automatically start. You can then manually start it whenever you want with: # systemctl start ...


2

If you want to disable completely the graphical session and boot into rescue mode edit the kernel line in grub at startup and add an s at the end of it. Alternatively you can also add systemd.unit=rescue to that line. See this thread To start gnome from commandline it depends on the login manager. If you have gdm for example try sudo gdm. If it's just ...


0

This was changed in October 2012 during/after the migration to systemd/logind. According to a bug report, running the X server on a different tty than the active consolekit session caused things to break because the session on (for example) TTY7 would not be authenticated . Without logind, one could use ck-launch-session in ~/.xinitrc to get a new session ...


4

I started my Linux journey with Ubuntu lucid, and currently use Arch. I've written a handful of Arch packages, and I'll say its far easier than writing Debian packages. But, I'd like to point out to @gentledevil that Arch does have a hooks system for packages, known as an install file. Basically, its named ${pkgname}.install, and contains a few functions ...


0

Two-part solution: Windows/ext2fs: Use the option to create a mount point which will be enabled at boot. This seems to work around the UUID (only tried one boot so far, so we'll see). Linux/fstab: Simply configure mount points by label: LABEL=Elements1 /media/elements1 [...] LABEL=Elements2 /media/elements2 [...]


1

The problem you are experiencing is because your system's hostname is changing. Originally your hostname was localhost, but after connecting it becomes localhost.localdomain. This can cause problems due to either of the following: 1. hostname resolution If the new hostname (localhost.localdomain) doesn't resolve properly, processes which use IP based ...


1

Confirm that you've created a full restore disk. It could be simply a repair/boot disk. I recently created restore disks from my laptop (and I know they works as I've used them) and they came to 3 DVDs. With a Windows full restore disk set you'll completely overwrite the HDD (wiping your Arch install), reinstating your Windows and OEM partitions. That ...


2

The /home partition is useful if, for example, at one point you want to reinstall Arch or install another distribution, because thus you will save your personal settings, browser history, etc.


1

Upgrade gcc-libs & it's dependencies (libtool & gcc) to most recent version and the issue will be solved. Or you can simply execute following command: sudo pacman -S libtool gcc gcc-libs


0

Hans de Goede is currently taking care of debugging this problem on Redhat's bugzilla: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1110011 This is currently the only place to look for news on this matter.


-1

Installing an operating system in VirtualBox would be the same experience as launching the installer on a computer without anything else installed. If you're going to install it on your MacBook, it's going to be insanely difficult as it is a completely different hardware set up then a normal PC. Even loading the installer was difficult for me.


-2

The configuration through a .yaourtrc is even better : no additional option to put down on the command line, and a finer control on what you want to do. Check for example : http://kissmyarch.blogspot.fr/2012/05/two-simple-yaourt-tips.html


1

I would sum it up this way : the base procedure will be exactly the same, though the results may differ. Here's where you may find the most significant changes : Drives configuration : your physical drive does not use the same technology, and does not have the same properties (size, ...) as the virtual one. Still, partitioning, formatting and mounting are ...


3

For the most part, yes it is the same. The real differences you'll encounter when doing this as a host OS (compared to a client VM OS) is that VMs emulate very common hardware. If you real machine uses less common hardware you may need to install drivers which aren't usually needed in a VM. The other difference is going to be your hard drive setup. In a VM ...


1

You need to add a subnet mask when you add the IP address. Now the system will think the IP is a /32, which does not include the ip 192.168.178.5, therefore it's unreachable. To add the new IP address with a subnet mask: ip addr add 192.168.178.201/24 dev eth0


0

i had this BadMatch Error problem until i deleted a previously added "1280x1024_60.00" because it could never use the double quoted mode successfully. Eventually, realized a better name for the mode helped. So i deleted "1280x1024_60.00" by running the following as a normal user: $ xrandr --version reports 1.4.0 and 1.4 $ xrandr | grep 1280 #Do you see ...


0

The Arch Linux Beginners Guide is great source for the general installation procedure: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners%27_Guide Backup! Just in case something gets wrong, I always find it very convenient to have a full backup of the disc to restore. I would suggest to boot into the Arch Linux Live system and connect and mount a portable HDD ...


1

You need to install the package lib32-openal for dota2 in addition to multilib-devel for steam. wiki


0

To gracefully shutdown your desktop, you may need to raise the TimeoutStopSec= for GDM, or whatever other display manager you are using.


0

There are many ways to do that, of course, but why would you want to? That's what the fstab file is for. Some ideas: Create a systemd mount or automount (or just a plain startup script that runs mount). Use a crontab to run mount. Have a start-up script in your desktop-environment. Find a tool in the official repos or AUR that do that for you (I don't ...


5

Spoofing your MAC-Address is relatively simple: General steps: Save your MAC for a future reset Temporary disable your interface to change your MAC Set your new, arbirtray MAC Enable your interface again Using different tools: With ip: ip link show <interface> &> ip_savehafen.log sudo ip link set dev <interface> down sudo ip ...


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


0

I did check your log and compare with my successful log, have seen that your ppp plugin for network-manager fail to be loaded and you need install networkmanager-pptp package to have it.


-1

It's possible check it on arch wiki . https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/LightDM



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