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16

Is this not how to set up a swap file? I think you missed a step in between chmod and swapon: mkswap /mnt/sda2/swapfile As for the oxymoromic error... swapon: /mnt/sda2/swapfile: read swap header failed: Success What this literally means is there's a bug in the swapon code, but not necessarily one related to its primary functioning. C library ...


12

That's not a conflict, its a reflection of the fact that the new version of X (1.16) has hit the repos and, as the news makes clear, glamour-egl is deprecated. Follow pacman's advice and select Y.


9

In cups v. 2.0.0 the service name has been changed (see also the install file here). You'll have to disable the old service: systemctl disable cups.service before enabling and starting the new one: systemctl enable org.cups.cupsd.service systemctl daemon-reload systemctl start org.cups.cupsd.service


8

I had exactly the same problem. Have you killed the dhcpd? I completely killed dhcpd: $ sudo killall dhcpcd After I disabled my wireless interface ($ ip link set down $ should work too): $ sudo ifconfig wlp3s0 down and my wifi-menu is working again.


8

As it's states in usage section, -p will skip pseudofs mounts (tmpfs, autofs and others): usage: genfstab [options] root Options: -L Use labels for source identifiers (shortcut for -t LABEL) -p Avoid printing pseudofs mounts -t TAG Use TAG for source identifiers -U Use UUIDs for source identifiers (shortcut for ...


7

Two comments. First, try to mount by Label or UUID instead of device. Device names can sometimes change. Otherwise, btrfs requires brtfs device scan call before it knows about btrfs filesystems on your machine. I expected arch to handle this but somehow it didn't work until I created a service file for this and put it in ...


7

You can switch the memory unit by pressing e. E will select the memory unit in the top summary bar. Use W to permanently write your configuration to /home/user/.toprc and see also ? for more configuration options.


7

Besides uninstalling the appropriate drivers (which might fail to work since some devices act as usual mouse devices and only need specific drivers for more sophisticated features and your list of installed drivers suggests this) you can also disable the device via the xinput tool or by explicitly matching in xorg.conf. To disable the device using xinput, ...


7

You don't typically clear the journal yourself. That is managed by systemd itself and old logs are rotated out as new data comes in. The correct thing to do would be to schedule journald to only keep as much data as you are interested in. The most usual thing to adjust is the total disk space it is allowed to take up. Once it crosses this boundry it will ...


6

I checked and I already had installed virtualbox-host-modules , then I tried to reinstall it. That wasn't enough. Then I tried the command sudo dkms autoinstall. Dkms isn't installed by default so I had to install dkms package. Then I started the service by typing sudo systemctl enable dkms.service . Then I could try with sudo dkms autoinstall again. I ...


6

The typo inside libX11 has been fixed upstream with commit 5dcb40f28d59587597d2ff6e6ac64c71cfe6ff7b and date 2013-09-17, and if you look at the commit log you'll see that this commit is above the last commit which got into release 1.6.2 of libX11. (2013-09-13) The 1.6.2 release is currently used in the extra repository on ArchLinux: ...


6

It appears that NTP is to far out of sync (1391656797.298671) and needs a forced sync. When using the -d option in ntpdate, it's just debugging. It goes through all the steps but doesn't actually force a sync. Do one of the following: 'ntpd -q' or 'ntpdate -buv ntp.ubuntu.com'


6

You have not explained what your actual goal is, beyond just using a computer that runs linux -- which apparently you've already been doing anyway for ~10 years. To be totally honest (since this is definitely an "opinion based" question), all the fussing with different distros borderline absurd. This is not to say they aren't different in superficial ways, ...


6

I had the exact same problem when i was trying to install arch on virtualbox earlier today. The solution is to run depmod $ depmod 3.14.4-1-ARCH After running modprobe again, it should work. You can use uname -r to find your kernel version string. Source


6

You can use systemd timers to execute script a minute after boot. First, create service file (/etc/systemd/system/myscript.service): [Unit] Description=MyScript [Service] Type=simple ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/myscript Then create timer (/etc/systemd/system/myscript.timer): [Unit] Description=Runs myscript every hour [Timer] # Time to wait after booting ...


5

You generally don't want to write the filesystem on the entire block device (ie. /dev/sdd), you want to create a partition and then put the filesystem in there (ie. /dev/sdd1). That is also what your mkfs complained about. If you are sure you only want to have one filesystem on this disk at a time, and you don't need a bootloader, you can safely ignore this ...


5

The equivalent is in /srv/http. You can find some discussion about its use in Arch in this mailing list post and this bug report (albeit only tangentially, those links discuss using it as a location for installed packages).


5

Because the log messages don't appear in the journal anywhere, I suspect that you don't have syslog to journald forwarding set up correctly, and the messages are simply getting dropped. Since you're on Arch, this is easy to fix. Ensure that the syslog-ng package is installed: pacman -S syslog-ng Then ensure that it's enabled on boot: systemctl enable ...


5

The option you are looking for is --noconfirm . It is available in pacman's 8 man page and is also available here however, it is best to avoid using it and is highly recommended to always read and understand pacman's output.


5

The update-grub "command" is just a script which runs the grub-mkconfig tool to generate a grub.cfg file. See the Archlinux GRUB documentation. It refers to the following: # grub-mkconfig -o /boot/grub/grub.cfg


5

If you just want to launch a program at startup, a login script is the wrong place to do it. Instead, write a systemd unit file (since Arch seems to use systemd). Create /etc/systemd/system/scanner.service (or whatever.service) : [Unit] Description=(description of your program) [Service] ExecStart=/usr/bin/mono /path/to/scannerSoftware.exe 127.0.0.1 ...


5

journalctl --since=today Reference


5

Initial ramdisks use Busybox to save space. Essentially, utilities like mv and cp all share a lot of common logic - open a file descriptor, read buffers into memory, etc. Busybox basically puts all the common logic into one binary which changes the way it behaves depending on the name with which it was called. Let's take a look at that ramdisk. ...


5

Your hooks are all here: % ls /usr/lib/initcpio/{hooks,install} /usr/lib/initcpio/hooks: btrfs dmraid keymap mdadm mhwd-fb miso_loop_mnt net shutdown udev v86d consolefont encrypt lvm2 memdisk miso miso_pxe_nbd resume sleep usr /usr/lib/initcpio/install: autodetect consolefont fw mdadm_udev miso_loop_mnt ...


5

Just connected with the developers, and my problem is resolved. My customized kernel does not support the open by file handle syscall, so I enabled the CONFIG_FHANDLE option, and it boots again.


5

No, pacman doesn't remove old packages from your cache (/var/cache/pacman/pkg) so, over time, it can fill up. You can adopt two approaches to clearing the cache: the brute force one with pacman -Sc: -c, --clean Remove packages that are no longer installed from the cache as well as currently unused sync databases to free up disk space. ...


5

Yes, the distros are of similar, with both being set to satisfy more experienced users, and both aim to be fast and highly customizable. Th most technical similarity is that both are based upon the Linux Kernel. While most functions may seem similar, the two are different in many ways. 1) Apparently, Gentoo documentation is said to be very intimidating to ...


5

Spoofing your MAC-Address is relatively simple: General steps: Save your MAC for a future reset Temporary disable your interface to change your MAC Set your new, arbirtray MAC Enable your interface again Using different tools: With ip: ip link show <interface> &> ip_savehafen.log sudo ip link set dev <interface> down sudo ip ...


5

This has more to do with systemd rather than the kernel, and in short, it means you just had a clean shutdown. See here : https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=174495 .


5

Yes, it will work in the same way as other PKGBUILDs with binary sources - extract it and copy files. The only thing which should be mentioned is that deb-archive consists of 3 other files - debian-binary, control.tar.gz, data.tar.gz. makepkg will extract only first-level archive and then you should manually extract data.tar.gz. prepare() { tar -zxvf ...



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