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17

autofs can do this for you. You can configure any number of mountpoints with various options, and the corresponding filesystems are mounted whenever the mountpoint is accessed. After a given amount of inactivity the filesystems are unmounted again. There are no doubt various ways of using autofs, but here's one way of doing what you're trying to do, based ...


15

In cups v. 2.0.0 the service name has been changed (see also the install file here). You'll have to disable the old service: systemctl disable cups.service before enabling and starting the new one: systemctl enable org.cups.cupsd.service systemctl daemon-reload systemctl start org.cups.cupsd.service


13

Besides uninstalling the appropriate drivers (which might fail to work since some devices act as usual mouse devices and only need specific drivers for more sophisticated features and your list of installed drivers suggests this) you can also disable the device via the xinput tool or by explicitly matching in xorg.conf. To disable the device using xinput, ...


12

You don't typically clear the journal yourself. That is managed by systemd itself and old logs are rotated out as new data comes in. The correct thing to do would be to schedule journald to only keep as much data as you are interested in. The most usual thing to adjust is the total disk space it is allowed to take up. Once it crosses this boundry it will ...


12

That's not a conflict, its a reflection of the fact that the new version of X (1.16) has hit the repos and, as the news makes clear, glamour-egl is deprecated. Follow pacman's advice and select Y.


9

Yes, the distros are of similar, with both being set to satisfy more experienced users, and both aim to be fast and highly customizable. Th most technical similarity is that both are based upon the Linux Kernel. While most functions may seem similar, the two are different in many ways. 1) Apparently, Gentoo documentation is said to be very intimidating to ...


9

You can do this with systemd, so you don't have to install extra software and just have a small amount of extra configuration. Simply add noauto,x-systemd.automount to the options in fstab. noauto to not mount automatically on boot and x-systemd.automount to let systemd mount it on access. Source: ArchWiki - fstab


7

The browser files on disc just get replaced. The running program (if not completely in memory) keeps the old executable files open until the program closes (but until then those are no longer the executables files you get via the directory entries). On the next restart of the browser you get the version. No reboot necessary except for the program that gets ...


7

From the btrfs gotchas page: Files with a lot of random writes can become heavily fragmented (10000+ extents) causing trashing on HDDs and excessive multi-second spikes of CPU load on systems with an SSD or large amount a RAM. On servers and workstations this affects databases and virtual machine images. The nodatacow mount option may be ...


6

I had the exact same problem when i was trying to install arch on virtualbox earlier today. The solution is to run depmod $ depmod 3.14.4-1-ARCH After running modprobe again, it should work. You can use uname -r to find your kernel version string. Source


6

You can use systemd timers to execute script a minute after boot. First, create service file (/etc/systemd/system/myscript.service): [Unit] Description=MyScript [Service] Type=simple ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/myscript Then create timer (/etc/systemd/system/myscript.timer): [Unit] Description=Runs myscript every hour [Timer] # Time to wait after booting ...


6

Yes, it will work in the same way as other PKGBUILDs with binary sources - extract it and copy files. The only thing which should be mentioned is that deb-archive consists of 3 other files - debian-binary, control.tar.gz, data.tar.gz. makepkg will extract only first-level archive and then you should manually extract data.tar.gz. prepare() { tar -zxvf ...


6

As you suspected, Unix-like systems prevent most files being executed from being overwritten. Here's what the standard says about the open system call: The open() function may fail if: [ETXTBSY] The file is a pure procedure (shared text) file that is being executed and oflag is O_WRONLY or O_RDWR. But a file being executed can still be unlinked, ...


5

No, pacman doesn't remove old packages from your cache (/var/cache/pacman/pkg) so, over time, it can fill up. You can adopt two approaches to clearing the cache: the brute force one with pacman -Sc: -c, --clean Remove packages that are no longer installed from the cache as well as currently unused sync databases to free up disk space. ...


5

Spoofing your MAC-Address is relatively simple: General steps: Save your MAC for a future reset Temporary disable your interface to change your MAC Set your new, arbirtray MAC Enable your interface again Using different tools: With ip: ip link show <interface> &> ip_savehafen.log sudo ip link set dev <interface> down sudo ip ...


5

The self maintenance method is to vacuum the logs by size or time. Retain only the past two days: journalctl --vacuum-time=2d Retain only the past 500 MB: journalctl --vacuum-size=500M man journalctl for more information.


5

This has more to do with systemd rather than the kernel, and in short, it means you just had a clean shutdown. See here : https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=174495 .


5

This can be done by using a custom dlagent. I do not really understand Arch packaging or how the dlagents work, so I only have a hack answer, but it gets the job done. The idea is to modify the PKGBUILD to use a custom download agent. I modified the source "${pkgname%-git}::git+http://github.com/Itseez/opencv.git" into ...


5

You can change this behaviour if you edit secure tmp option in /lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service. systemctl stop mariadb next edit /lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service as you change PrivateTmp to false: # Place temp files in a secure directory, not /tmp PrivateTmp=false # default is true and finally: systemctl daemon-reload systemctl start mariadb ...


4

I started my Linux journey with Ubuntu lucid, and currently use Arch. I've written a handful of Arch packages, and I'll say its far easier than writing Debian packages. But, I'd like to point out to @gentledevil that Arch does have a hooks system for packages, known as an install file. Basically, its named ${pkgname}.install, and contains a few functions ...


4

The rule syntax above may work on some distributions, but did not work on mine (Raspbian). Since I never found a single document that explains all the ins and outs, I wrote my own, to be found here. This is what it boils down to. 1. find out what's on ttyUSB: dmesg | grep ttyUSB 2. list all attributes of the device and pick out a unique identifier set, ...


4

I ran across the same issue just now, and found another workaround. Basically, it involves making the hosts /run directory available to the guest. First, we mount /run where it can be accessed by the guest. I will assume that your install partition is mounted at /mnt mkdir /mnt/hostrun mount --bind /run /mnt/hostrun Then, we chroot into the guest, and ...


4

When setting up a new Arch install I usually do the following: pacman -S alsa-utils Then fire up alsamixer with alsamixer Go to 'Master' then press M and then keep hitting the up key to bring the sound levels up. I do that for any other inputs I want like pcm etc. Then do speaker-test -c2 with the number being how many channels you want to test. ...


4

qtconfig no longer exist in Qt5. Qt5 applications will use the current desktop settings by default, but it doesn't work perfectly. For instance I'm using XFCE and it doesn't automatically set the style to Gtk. The style can be set with the -style command line option, for instance -style=gtk . Or you can use a specific Qt stylesheet with -stylesheet. You ...


4

As long as your touchscreen is detected as a boring input device, you could do this with xinput. This tool allows you to define new master pointers (the virtual pointer which resembles one mouse pointer) and to detach and attach slave pointers (the actual hardware devices) from and to it. So all you need to do is create a new master pointer reattach your ...


4

To add a user with his home directory automatically, adduser is the correct command, while it creates user, home directory, allows you to set password in that moment & let you set more info about the user (full name, address, phone, etc). I recommend you to remove the user, remove the created dir and run this command of course as root. # userdel 'user' ...


4

Using unofficial install scripts and guides are typically a recipe for unhappiness under Arch Linux. As recommended by @jasonwryan, you should really just follow the Beginners' Guide on the ArchWiki. If you do not have access to another computer on which to keep the Wiki page open, you can actually install one of two packages which provide (fairly) ...


4

What you mean by GNOME auto starting is, most likely, actually gdm (GNOME Display Manager) which provides the login screen. Just disable the service to stop it from autostarting. Arch uses systemd, so you want to do: # systemctl disable gdm Reboot and gdm won't automatically start. You can then manually start it whenever you want with: # systemctl start ...


4

It sound slike one of your systems is configured to treat the hardware clock as localtime, while the other one treats it as UTC. Ubuntu docs leave me to believe Ubuntu is UTC by default, so probably your Arch isn't. You can check and set this by checking if timedatectl status | grep local returns anything, and set Arch to use UTC by saying timedatectl ...


4

I recently solved this problem myself on Arch Linux. I used the program xss-lock from the AUR found here. I was trying to set up a service to lock the screen on sleep but for some reason I couldn't get it to work. I ended up using xss-lock and it worked very easily. Install xss-lock from the AUR. Add one of the commands below to your .xprofile or ...



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