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31

Take a look on Linux From Scratch, LFS they have a tutorial which teaches you how to build your own Linux System, once you understood that you can select a package manager and a set of packages hence creating your own distro. A thing to make the answer a bit more complete, ArchLinux is a Linux Distribuition which uses almost 100% vanilla packages. This ...


25

Many programs make use of this technique where there is a single executable that changes its behavior based on how it was executed. There's typically a structure inside the program called a case/switch statement that determines the name the executable was called with and then will call the appropriate functionality for that executable name. That name is ...


20

The Yocto Project is a "distribution builder". There is extensive documentation and a graphical builder, called Hob.


16

Is this not how to set up a swap file? I think you missed a step in between chmod and swapon: mkswap /mnt/sda2/swapfile As for the oxymoromic error... swapon: /mnt/sda2/swapfile: read swap header failed: Success What this literally means is there's a bug in the swapon code, but not necessarily one related to its primary functioning. C library ...


15

Binaries have been moved to /usr/bin. You need to approach the upgrade in two phases, as per the news article. First remove or update any packages from non-official repos, then update your system in three distinct steps: pacman -Syu --ignore filesystem,bash pacman -S bash pacman -Su If you encounter any difficulties, there is a long thread on the Arch ...


8

Rsync has code which specifically checks if a file is truncated during read and gives this error — ENODATA. I don't know why the files in /sys have this behavior, but since they're not real files, I guess it's not too surprising. There doesn't seem to be a way to tell rsync to skip this particular check. I think you're probably better off not rsyncing /sys ...


8

dpkg for Arch exists. You should be able to install .deb packages on arch, but you should also not use it instead of pacman, so just use it for selected few packages. The default command looks like: # dpkg -i package.deb


8

Sure. You can create a tap device fairly easily, either with tunctl (from uml-utilities, at least on Debian): # tunctl -t eth0 Set 'eth0' persistent and owned by uid 0 # ifconfig eth0 eth0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr a6:9b:fe:d8:d9:5e BROADCAST MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1 RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0 ...


8

A window manager is what runs after you've logged in. A graphical login screen is called a display manager. To set up a display manager in Arch, consult the wiki. It boils down to installing a display manager with pacman, and then systemctl enable [your chosen display manager]


7

Upstream added a separate service for the dispatcher. Try running: systemctl enable NetworkManager-dispatcher.service then systemctl start NetworkManager-dispatcher.service Since dbus-org.freedesktop.nm-dispatcher.service is an alias, it should be working: systemctl status dbus-org.freedesktop.nm-dispatcher.service NetworkManager-dispatcher.service - ...


7

Why pipe less into anything? That turns it into cat. The obvious answer is grep some_var * | less You'll get output of the form filename:this line contains some_var somewhere If you pass the option -n to grep, you also get line numbers: filename:42:this line contains some_var somewhere Many editors have some form of file search built in, with the ...


7

Is it possible? Yes. Is it a good idea? That depends. You would only really need to do this if the application only exists as a .deb package. It is much more likely that you can just grab the upstream source and write a simple PKGBUILD to install it with pacman. You should also search the AUR to ensure that someone hasn't done this already.


6

The fan Mine does this too, running Fedora 14. Try getting a compressed can of air and blowing out the vents on the back and side of the case. Also periodically you'll wan to remove the keyboard and blow compressed air directly on the fan's blades. They get caked with dust and start to effect its effectiveness by weighting it down. The best thing about ...


6

To get system where your locale is en-US.UTF-8 (assuming you want utf-8, which is recommended) and keyboard layout in both X.Org and virtual consoles is de-latin1-nodeadkeys, do these steps: uncomment line "en-US.UTF-8" from /etc/locale.gen (e.g. sed -i 's/#en-US.UTF-8/en-US.UTF-8/' /etc/locale.gen) locale-gen echo LANG=en-US.UTF-8 > /etc/locale.conf ...


6

The problem was simply that the efivars kernel module was not loaded. This can be confirmed by: sh-4.2# efivar-tester UEFI variables are not supported on this machine. If you are chrooted in to your new install, exit out, and then enable efivars: exit modprobe efivars ...and then chroot back in. In my case, this means: chroot /mnt but you should ...


6

I'm guessing the real problem is that you don't know what a SSID is. It's the technical term for the network's name, i.e. the thing that shows up in a listing of available networks. If you don't know what network you're supposed to connect to, you'll have to ask somebody at your location. As the Arch wiki explains, you can get a list of available networks ...


6

You probably want to do something like: screen -p 0 -X hardcopy this generates a file hardcopy.0 with the content of the screen session. The argument to -p determines which session. The files are dumped in screens current working directory or to the directory set set with the hardcopydir command. Check the screen configuration file for hardcopydir ...


6

You have not explained what your actual goal is, beyond just using a computer that runs linux -- which apparently you've already been doing anyway for ~10 years. To be totally honest (since this is definitely an "opinion based" question), all the fussing with different distros borderline absurd. This is not to say they aren't different in superficial ways, ...


6

As it's states in usage section, -p will skip pseudofs mounts (tmpfs, autofs and others): usage: genfstab [options] root Options: -L Use labels for source identifiers (shortcut for -t LABEL) -p Avoid printing pseudofs mounts -t TAG Use TAG for source identifiers -U Use UUIDs for source identifiers (shortcut for ...


5

Update2: Forgot you posted the tar ball. Too bad. Anyhow, did a test on your .mod files by using the below code and: ./grum_lic_test32 evan_teitelman/boot/grub/i386-pc/*.mod which yielded the following error: ... bufio.mod License: LICENSE=GPLv3+ OK cacheinfo.mod License: LICENSE=NONE_FOUND ERR cat.mod ...


5

The ARM package has only just been updated; it likely just hasn't propagated to your mirror yet. You can change your mirror in /etc/pacman.d/mirrorlist and then force a rsync of your local database with pacman -Syyu. Or you could just wait for the package to arrive on your current mirror.


5

I'd recommend that you use rvm to manage Ruby versioning. First install rvm: curl -L get.rvm.io | bash -s stable --autolibs=enabled . ~/.rvm/scripts/rvm rvm requirements You'll probably want to source that on shell startup as well, so add it to your ~/.bashrc: cat >> ~/.bashrc << 'EOF' [[ -r ~/.rvm/scripts/rvm ]] && . ...


5

less isn't really meant for doing what you're trying to do; it's for displaying long text files in a paginated format. grep allows for a file or list of files to be passed as a command line argument, so you can simply do grep -H some_var * which will give you output that looks like this because the -H option prefixes the name to the result: filename: ...


5

Part of the answer depends on what you mean by your own distro. if you mean a version of Linux custom built to your own purposes for you to use on your own machines, or even in your own office, there are a couple of pretty cool tools that allow you to customize existing distributions that are known working. ...


5

Q#1: Or, to be more general, what pieces of software are common amongst all Linux distributions, i.e. define a Linux distribution? If we are talking about a GNU/Linux distribution, I can surely guess that the userland is pretty much the same among distributions. I can't think of one that get's away without using GNU Coreutils, GNU Binutils, GNU Bash, ...


5

renice does affect the priority of a process. But as you've experienced, just because a process has higher priority doesn't imply that it will have all the resources it needs. A higher priority merely gives the process a bigger chance to grab resources. renice only affects CPU time. So it only has an effect if two or more processes are competing for CPU ...


5

It isn't writing anything to the disk; it is reading from it. Swap is only used to hold data that is not backed by another file. Data, including program code, that is backed by another file can simply be discarded when it has not been modified. So what you are seeing is your programs being discarded to free up some ram, then having to be read in from the ...


5

You generally don't want to write the filesystem on the entire block device (ie. /dev/sdd), you want to create a partition and then put the filesystem in there (ie. /dev/sdd1). That is also what your mkfs complained about. If you are sure you only want to have one filesystem on this disk at a time, and you don't need a bootloader, you can safely ignore this ...


5

The equivalent is in /srv/http. You can find some discussion about its use in Arch in this mailing list post and this bug report (albeit only tangentially, those links discuss using it as a location for installed packages).


5

The typo inside libX11 has been fixed upstream with commit 5dcb40f28d59587597d2ff6e6ac64c71cfe6ff7b and date 2013-09-17, and if you look at the commit log you'll see that this commit is above the last commit which got into release 1.6.2 of libX11. (2013-09-13) The 1.6.2 release is currently used in the extra repository on ArchLinux: ...



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