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Read through this helpful page of the Arch Wiki: Systemd Targets. Systemd targets are roughly equivalent to the old runlevels when everything used the init system. Change your target from 5(multi-user graphical) to 3(multi-user no graphics). This should drop you into a terminal login screen upon boot. If you want to go graphical just type "startx."


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Quoting the ArchLinux wiki: Note: Because of the process substitution, you cannot run this command with sudo - you will need a root shell. You should be able to use su -c under sudo like so: $ sudo su -c 'wpa_supplicant -D nl80211,wext -i wlp4s0 -c \ <(wpa_passphrase "some ssid" "password")'


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Process substitution <(…) creates a pipe, uses /dev/fd to give a path that's equivalent to the file descriptor where the pipe is, and passes the file name as an argument to the program. Here the program is sudo, and it passes that argument (which is just a string, as far as it's concerned) to wpa_supplicant, which treats it as a file name. The problem is ...


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TL;TR: FTP is a broken protocol and FTPS more so. Due to a combination of protocol design and encryption it plays very bad together with firewalls. Try to use SFTP (i.e. file transfer over SSH protocol) instead. FTP consists of a control connection (usually port 21) and the data connections. Which ports are used by the data connections are dynamically ...


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Warnings as errors are usually result of -Werror passed somewhere to the compiler. It can be intentional enforcement from developer to see how much mistakes are still there and being left only because it's still in development, or intentional enforcement in mission critical software. Anyway, you need to find out where -Werror is. grep is a nice tool for ...


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The answer is no. All files outside of home directories are not owned by root. There is a rich and complex set of users and groups, and permissions, on files outside of user home directories for a number of reasons, some historical, and some security related. However, tar implementations have two usual modes, they either, restore files and directories ...


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Most but not all files that are part of the system are owned by the root user. It's rare for system files not to be owned by root, because a user that owns system files can modify them and this is usually not desirable. It's a lot more common to have files that are owned by a group other than root, and that have mode 660 or 664 or 640. It's possible to ...


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You are not booted in EFI-mode. Can you disable Secure Boot -- it could be falling back to "Legacy" mode in the absence of a correctly signed kernel image and bootloader. And if you have already disabled Secure Boot, this means that you motherboard do not allow UEFI. The reason why this step is vital is that Legacy boot use MBR and UEFI mostly use ESP. So, ...


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The menu fonts should change based on your GTK font, but the font used in web pages is a combination of firefox settings and fontconfig. To change the setting in Firefox for example, go to Edit > Preferences > 'Content' tab > and click the 'Advanced' button next to 'Default font'. Here you can change the setting for various languages. If you want to see ...


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Before using Xorg on archlinux, it need to be configured. One way to do it is to run: Xorg :0 -configure cp ~/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf


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I asked the same question in the Manjaro Forum and got the following solution: Those issues are related to the latest gtk3.20 changes, alot of themes are broken now. Also the manjaro xfce main theme switches from menda to maia, so your problems are solved when you switch to our new theme (available in dark and normal and just beautiful :)) sudo pacman ...



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