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There is a script on the Arch Wiki pacman tips page for finding files not owned by any package. That will assist you tracking down what was installed with quassel. In future, you should only ever use pacman to install packages, so they remain tracked and you don't end up cluttering your system with unmanaged files. Using ABS, the AUR or taking a little time ...


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Unless you can't (or don't want to) use persistent device naming (mentioned by @jasonwryan in his comment), you can: try swapping the installed drives until you achieve the desired outcome. This however, will be tedious and error prone, plus it is likely to break the other installed OSes. tell your bootloader to pass root=/dev/sdc1 to the kernel when ...


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It is pretty easy to build it from sources if you need it on your development machine: https://github.com/couchbase/manifest#building-with-repo repo init -u git://github.com/couchbase/manifest.git -m rel-3.0.1.xml repo sync make it will install server for you to $PWD/install


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This will help you ip r l && ip addr show {interface name} | grep ether Ex. ip r l && ip addr show eth0 | grep ether Sample output ip r l && ip addr show wlan0 | grep ether default via 192.168.1.254 dev wlan0 proto static 192.168.1.0/24 dev wlan0 proto kernel scope link src 192.168.1.42 link/ether e4:d5:3d:ef:90:a9 brd ...


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Seems this is not possible and unwanted by upstream (redirecting stdout/stderr to individual files) see e.g. http://lists.freedesktop.org/archives/systemd-devel/2012-March/004705.html - read the whole thread for more context information how this is intended to work. What you can do, is either log to syslog, and that way write to individual files. Or the ...


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This already does a full backup. The contents of the directories that are excluded (such as dev, run, etc) are created in run time and should not be backed up. Copying boot folder will not override your boot sector, so that is fine. Using rsync here is the correct method as rsync can work within the same system or remotely and it will also only update ...


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To answer the question more directly. Yes downgrading can cause screwey problems with other software. And what you downgrade may not fit with dependencys that are not downgraded. Which is part of why its not supported. While I find downgrading necessary at times it can be problematic....


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You are better off using ip a, but with your current output, you could use awk: awk ' BEGIN { RS="\n\n"} /eth0/ && /UP/ {ifc=$1; ip=$6; subn=$8; gway=$10; mac=$12} END {print "Interface: "ifc "\nIP: "ip "\nSubnet: "subn "\nGateway: "gway "\nMac: "mac} ' <(ifconfig -a) Interface: eth0: IP: 192.168.0.154 Subnet: 255.255.255.0 Gateway: ...


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Assuming you mean the location that journald writes to, I think not. The configuration file for journald is /etc/systemd/journald.conf, and the documentation for it doesn't list a way to choose locations. You might be able to work around it by making /var/log/journal a link to somewhere else, or mount something on that directory.


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This means that you don't have the correct libraries installed. Try a search using pacman -Ss libav. On OpenSuSE this is part of libavcodec52 which says that it is related to ffmpeg. Check if you have ffmpeg installed at well as dependencies should pull in libavcodec. EDIT After reading the arch documentation, it looks like ffmpeg does provide the ...


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If you have Vixie cron installed, you can add a @reboot entry in your crontab file: Instead of the first five fields, one of eight special strings may appear: string meaning ------ ------- @reboot Run once, at startup. There you can take some action (i.e. writing some unique file) that you can check for ...


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Making a bootable USB with Arch (Live), mounting everything, going into arch-chroot, then removing xf86-video-intel did the trick.


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You can use the resolv.conf.head and resolv.conf.tail files to add lines before and after the content generated by resolvconf


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According to your search the par2cmdline package in not installed on your system. If it was, it would show : [installed] on the line. And pkgfile tells you which package in the repositories contains par2, but not which of the packages installed on your system owns the par2 executable in your $PATH. To see that use pacman -Qo `which par2`.


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After reading more on the internets I found out that a newer version of systemd requires a kernel with configuration option CONFIG_FHANDLE=y - however, this option is not present on the kernel version included in the official banana-pi ArchLinux image (3.4.90). I recompiled the kernel with the option included and now the login prompt appears as expected -> ...


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Set options you want (see help with ? key), then save them with W So, to get something like old top back, press zV1W Mine ~/.toprc currently looks like this: top's Config File (Linux processes with windows) Id:i, Mode_altscr=0, Mode_irixps=1, Delay_time=1.500, Curwin=0 Def ...


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It might be a bad SSD. Can you reproduce this behaviour from a LiveCD? (fsck, mount, write some data, umount, reboot LiveCD, mount, check data...) If that shows the same issues, it's either the SSD or a filesystem so broke that fsck does not actually fix it. If it does not happen with the Live CD, the culprit may be something else, like your kernel or your ...


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Explanation Please note that your issue has nothing to do with Chromium, as this issue could be affecting more than just Chromium. Your system has lost track of the location of some of the installed dynamic libraries, or you may have installed/updated them, and the update did not finish properly. This is verified by the fact that root can still run the ...


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I have installed Debian testing Jessie on the Thinkpad Helix. Overall the experience is acceptable. The tablet works, the pen works, the docking system works. It runs very hot, but I'm reasonably sure would happen with any OS, and I haven't tried any tricks to tune it. I'd recommend the effort.


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sleep.target is specific to system services. The reason is, sleep.target is not a magic target that automatically gets activated when going to sleep. It's just a regular target that puts the system to sleep – so the 'user' instances of course won't have an equivalent. (And unfortunately the 'user' instances currently have no way to depend on systemwide ...


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I had the same issue after a fresh install of arch. I checked, double checked and triple checked the locale.gen and even removed every locale except en_US.UTF-8. I was just about to give up when I checked under settings, Regions & Language and discovered the language was not set even though I had run the command to set it. After picking english and ...


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Indeed, there are keyservers that listen on port 80. One such keyserver is hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80. Indeed, pacman-key uses gpg under the hood. You might have tried specifying a keyserver by passing the --keyserver argument to pacman-key. This didn't work for me. You might have tried specifying a keyserver by creating or altering ...


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There is a nice utility in the AUR-Repository (aur/pacdep). pacdep has a lot of options - just one example - find out optional packages for "thunar-archive-plugin": > pacdep -oppp thunar-archive-plugin [...] Optional dependencies: 6.16 MiB extra/file-roller 3.89 MiB extra/kdeutils-ark 1.12 MiB community/xarchiver 1.16 MiB [...] The ...



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