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4

You can change this behaviour if you edit secure tmp option in /lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service. systemctl stop mariadb next edit /lib/systemd/system/mariadb.service as you change PrivateTmp to false: # Place temp files in a secure directory, not /tmp PrivateTmp=false # default is true and finally: systemctl daemon-reload systemctl start mariadb ...


4

You CPU is slow. A score of 760 for a dual core CPU is bad. If you take a look at the single-core performance for that CPU on the site it's on par with a good Pentium III. The GPU should be good enough for YouTube but together with the CPU it could be not enough. I can watch 760p YouTube in HTML5 on a Pentium M with a much slower AMD GPU. Be sure to have ...


3

In UNIX, only root can change the owner of files. As a consequence, we can conclude that the owner of the file is not changing when you edit it. Instead what must be happening is that your editor is writing out the edited contents into a new file and replacing the old file with the new one. Because it is a brand new file, the file ends up being tagged with ...


3

I'm not sure you will like this answer, but, in my experience too, using PTP has always caused a high WTF/min. Presumably the camera itself restricts writing in the root folder, or something equally sensical. I would suggest getting your hands on a CompactFlash reader, mounting the filesystem directly, and using that type of access to copy your firmware ...


2

If you need just simple things like your example, just grep them out of the Makefile. For more complicated things, GNU Make has a -p option which prints the database after running Make, which includes all the variable definitions (and a lot more). You can use it together with -n, which causes the actions to not actually run (so nothing gets built). You can ...


2

You may try to extract the values with grep and sed. For example: filename="$HOME/kernelbuild/linux-3.14.37/Makefile" version=$(grep -m 1 VERSION $filename | sed 's/^.*= //g') This greps for first occurrence of "VERSION" in Makefile


1

Yes, some editors will basically delete the old file with the new edited file. Thus the owner is the one that made the edit and the group would be your primary group. However, you enforce the group on files under the directory by changing the directory permissions using chmod g+s . .... this will cause any newly created file to be in the same group as ...


1

DAD is inherently slow because it has to work without feedback. The way DAD works is that before an address is activated on an interface, a neighbor discovery request is sent asking for the MAC address of the host which has that IP address. If the address is duplicated the host which already has the address will respond, and DAD will fail quickly. But ...


1

In the end, the solution to alleviating the choppiness was removing pulseaudio (and pulseaudio-alsa, and configuring alsa correctly, for which I used asoundconf, and rebooting).


1

Why are you using gparted at all? Either you want the ISO on it, which you have achieved by dd, or you want to do something else. You can't do both (once you put the ISO on it you must not change it in any way). If you partition a device with GPT, it does the following: It puts a MSDOS partition table at the beginning of the device (just so programs ...


1

No. You can log in as root, but that is dangerous and not recommended. Instead, set the correct ownership on the files in the first place. If they are your files, within for example, /home/jsguy then they should all (mostly?) be owned by you at which point you can delete them without using sudo. However, if they are system files, for example, the list of ...


1

pacstrap is part of arch-install-scripts; you can read the script to understand how it works. As the help message notes: pacstrap installs packages to the specified new root directory. If no packages are given, pacstrap defaults to the "base" group. pkgfile is a utility that lets you query pacman's database: pkgfile /etc/fstab core/filesystem So, to ...


1

The functionality you are looking for is through nectl-auto. netctl is for auto connecting on boot or whenever the service through systemd is started where netctl-auto connects to the profiles enabled in its own manager and you would only have netctl-auto@[interface].service enabled. netctl netctl-auto


1

Your ultimate problem was that mailx, when called from a shell script run by smartd, started by systemd, on Arch Linux, was not reading the root user's $HOME/.mailrc file. This was caused by a few factors: The mailx on Arch Linux, s-nail, relies on the environment variable HOME when looking for the .mailrc file. If HOME isn't present, it uses the current ...


1

As pointed out by Wieland, the /etc/conf.d/memcached file was removed when the package was changed to use a systemd unit. The /etc/conf.d directory was used by SysVinit, and hence no longer applicable. The options for the service can be edited by editing the systemd unit. The recommended way to do this is to run systemctl edit memcached.service --full. This ...


1

Found the permanent way after a long night up with lots of half baked solutions. # backup your symbols file sudo cp /usr/share/X11/xkb/symbols/us{,.distribution} Add the following line in the xkb_symbols "basic" { section. do not worry if that second line is not there, it is only there for some languages and was not there for us on my system. ... ...


1

There is an old script which does a really good job; it is called safepac. What does it do and how does it work? The way I usually update Arch is to read the news and then do pacman -Syu, or to just do pacman -Syu and if anything goes wrong, read the news. Now this script does nothing else: It gets the latest news entries from the RSS feed, does ...



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