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4

The rule syntax above may work on some distributions, but did not work on mine (Raspbian). Since I never found a single document that explains all the ins and outs, I wrote my own, to be found here. This is what it boils down to. 1. find out what's on ttyUSB: dmesg | grep ttyUSB 2. list all attributes of the device and pick out a unique identifier set, ...


3

This is a bug. The actual root cause is somewhat deeper: systemd's reload logic is flawed. That's why you saw it only when you had actually enabled a unit (i. e. a "disabled -> enabled" transition had taken place): in this case systemd implicitly reloads the units. I'm working on fixing the bug; in the meantime, if this manifestation (spontaneous volume ...


3

Copy .xinitrc from /root/ to /etc/skel/ and when you add users it will be automatically in their homes. For the existing users just copy /root/.xinitrc to their homes and chown it to their user:group.


3

DEL doesn't indicate that that process deleted /dev/zero, but that that process is using /dev/zero and the instance of /dev/zero that was being used has since been deleted. For example, if I have a command (say some-command) that uses /some/file and I do: $ some-command & $ rm /some/file $ touch /some/file Then lsof for /some/file would look like: ...


2

On Arch linux, the closest I got was: Edit /etc/systemd/journald.conf to set SystemMaxUse=1M Restarting journal: sudo systemctl restart systemd-journald Resetting SystemMaxUse=200M Re-Restarting the journal On my system, each journal file is 8MB, and the above cleared all but 3, bringing the total size to ~25MB. My use-case was disabling CoW for BTRFS ...


2

I'm not sure you will like this answer, but, in my experience too, using PTP has always caused a high WTF/min. Presumably the camera itself restricts writing in the root folder, or something equally sensical. I would suggest getting your hands on a CompactFlash reader, mounting the filesystem directly, and using that type of access to copy your firmware ...


2

The Arch Linux wiki has a detailled article about configuring the keyboard. If you want to set it only for your user (after login), you can put the setxkbmap command in your ~/.xprofile or ~/.xinitrc. As explained in the wiki, if you want the setting to be global you can create a Xorg configuration file /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/10-keyboard.conf : Section ...


2

You are confusing the rw option with the umask. The rw option merely dictates that the partition is not mounted read-only. The umask option dictates what permission that not set on files and directories. Your current umask of 022 sets the permission bits to 755 which translates to rwxr-xr-x. Change the umask to 000, which should give you 777 or rwxrwxrwx ...


1

Try not using /dev/sdX to idendify your devices, instead use its UUID and you should always be safe. Use the blkid command to identify your device's UUID and modify your fstab using UUID=YourDevicesUUID replacing /dev/sdX. You will also need to modify your /etc/grub/grub.cfg to set your root device as the UUID of the drive you want to boot from.


1

It would apear that the rpcbind systemd unit files went missing: $ find /usr/lib/systemd -name 'rpcbind*' # no output Reinstalling this solved the issue: $ pacman -S rpcbind # [...] $ find /usr/lib/systemd -name 'rpcbind* /usr/lib/systemd/system/rpcbind.service /usr/lib/systemd/system/rpcbind.target /usr/lib/systemd/system/rpcbind.socket $ systemd ...


1

One way or another, the script cannot be executed. Try to launch it from the shell Check noexec, SELinux, etc (whatever security restrictions you could have) Check the shebang in the first line of the script (spaces before #, spaces before !, verify existence of /bin/sh) By the way: Remove sudo from the script, it is already ran as root The redirection ...


1

Instead of an explicit dependency, perhaps you could use an automount. I remember Systemd advertised this during Poettering's initial blog post, as a kind of implicit dependency. It's like how (with systemd) you can write requests to a socket and the appropriate service will be started for you, aka "socket activation". In this case, accessing the ...


1

I have an ATI Radeon HD 6310. This are the compton.conf settings I use: backend = "glx"; paint-on-overlay = false; glx-no-stencil = true; refresh-rate = 0; vsync = "opengl-mswc"; They work very well. Maybe they help you too?


1

For certain packages (ones that I most probably don't want to hack), I make my own package using this: https://github.com/bluepeppers/pip2arch then build and install the PKGBUILD produced. I leave virtualenvs for packages I might want to modify or hack.


1

Since udev v209 this is done the following way: ln -s /dev/null /etc/udev/rules.d/80-net-setup-link.rules See also: http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Software/systemd/PredictableNetworkInterfaceNames/#idontlikethishowdoidisablethis



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