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16

Is this not how to set up a swap file? I think you missed a step in between chmod and swapon: mkswap /mnt/sda2/swapfile As for the oxymoromic error... swapon: /mnt/sda2/swapfile: read swap header failed: Success What this literally means is there's a bug in the swapon code, but not necessarily one related to its primary functioning. C library ...


6

As it's states in usage section, -p will skip pseudofs mounts (tmpfs, autofs and others): usage: genfstab [options] root Options: -L Use labels for source identifiers (shortcut for -t LABEL) -p Avoid printing pseudofs mounts -t TAG Use TAG for source identifiers -U Use UUIDs for source identifiers (shortcut for ...


5

Initial ramdisks use Busybox to save space. Essentially, utilities like mv and cp all share a lot of common logic - open a file descriptor, read buffers into memory, etc. Busybox basically puts all the common logic into one binary which changes the way it behaves depending on the name with which it was called. Let's take a look at that ramdisk. ...


4

I did this exact thing this morning. First, double check that the lease isn't allocated. Go to the Status page and then the LAN page on DD-WRT. Check the lease in the list of DHCP clients. If it's allocated, click the trash can. I also have my lease set to 5 minutes. If I left it for a whole day, which is the default, I found that if the signal got ...


4

Two comments. First, try to mount by Label or UUID instead of device. Device names can sometimes change. Otherwise, btrfs requires brtfs device scan call before it knows about btrfs filesystems on your machine. I expected arch to handle this but somehow it didn't work until I created a service file for this and put it in ...


4

While it isn't a very common setup, some installations only have some very small local storage, or indeed none at all and retrieve the boot code including the kernel via TFTP. The kernel then mounts its root filesystem over the network, e.g. with NFS. For such systems, basic networking tools may be necessary to locate and mount the root filesystem. The ...


3

Your hooks are all here: % ls /usr/lib/initcpio/{hooks,install} /usr/lib/initcpio/hooks: btrfs dmraid keymap mdadm mhwd-fb miso_loop_mnt net shutdown udev v86d consolefont encrypt lvm2 memdisk miso miso_pxe_nbd resume sleep usr /usr/lib/initcpio/install: autodetect consolefont fw mdadm_udev miso_loop_mnt ...


3

Short answer, it's a hold-over from where the busybox came from. Odds are low you'll ever need network access from the boot recovery environment. The odds are even lower you'll even have a network driver available -- distro kernels don't have them built-in, and they won't be in the initrd unless you put them there.


2

With the information you put, it seems that: #Arch linux $ sudo df -h [sudo] password for eduan: Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda3 97G 22G 70G 24% / #Ubuntu df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on /dev/sda5 46G 4.3G 40G 10% / You should launch arch linux and update the grub and ...


2

Thanks to @jasonwryan for advice, I did the following: First, I removed my old installation: # rm -rf /usr/local/texlive $ rm -rf ~/.texlive2013 Then I just installed lilypond with pacman, which pulled texlive-core and texlive-bin as dependencies: # pacman -S lilypond Then I installed some optional dependencies (psutils and t1utils), followed by ...


2

Your disks aren't mounting - and I notice they're supposed to be encrypted. I wonder - what are their ownership settings? 208 Changelog: * A new kernel command line option luks.options= is understood now which allows specifiying LUKS options for usage for LUKS encrypted partitions specified with luks.uuid=. Maybe it's expected you should ...


2

Your issue was that the hooks are executed in the order they are listed in the HOOKS line (which is just an array) in /etc/mkinitcpio.conf. Essentially, you were trying to run the encrypt script before the base hook, which provides the runtime necessities for booting1. You can read about each of the hooks by issuing mkinitcpio -H $hook. The Arch Wiki ...


1

No, there is no safe way to do this in the long term. From the manual: -r, --root Specify an alternative installation root (default is /). This should not be used as a way to install software into /usr/local instead of /usr. This option is used if you want to install a package on a temporary mounted partition that is "owned" by ...


1

First I think the problem is mounting the USB in the /run directory. Try this: create a mounting point on /media. Let's named myUsb sudo mkdir /media/myUsb Try to remount with rw permissions sudo mount -o remount,rw /partition/identifier /mount/point Then in your case the command will be sudo mount -o remount,rw /dev/sdc1 /media/myUsb


1

The problem is probably systemd. It is not very robust - its dependencies sometimes lock up and prevent continuation of the boot process even if everything would actually be just fine. It takes the dependencies very seriously -- too seriously to be dependable. I had the following experience once: because an external didn't mount, the dependencies for local ...


1

Install qdbus. The syntax is: qdbus servicename path function parameters servicename is usually the name of a program (eg: org.freedesktop.Geoclue.Master), path is something like /org/freedesktop/Geoclue/Master/client0, function looks like org.freedesktop.Geoclue.GetStatus. If you type an incomplete command (eg: only servicename, and not path and the ...


1

Why are you running wifi-menu each time you start? Unless you are constantly connecting to new wireless networks, you should simply use wifi-menu once to create a profile, then use netctl to automatically connect when you boot.


1

I had exactly the same problem. Have you killed the dhcpd? I completely killed dhcpd: $ sudo killall dhcpcd After I disabled my wireless interface ($ ip link set down $ should work too): $ sudo ifconfig wlp3s0 down and my wifi-menu is working again.


1

I don't know the Arch distribution. I do have Fedora 20 (including systemd) and have configured it to accept remote syslog messages. IMHO, this functionality is not related to systemd. The systemd-journald.service interposes itself between the kernel/userspace programs and the syslog subsystem. It captures (I think) only the local messages from these ...


1

The best way is to find what programs/services use the old libraries and restart them. And you can achieve it by listing all used files using 'lsof' and find those that have 'DEL' type. DEL means filename was removed from the filesystem but it is still stuck in memory because someone uses it. Here is the full command line: sudo lsof +c 0 | grep 'DEL.*lib' ...


1

Your problem is actually really easy to solve, although I can't blame you for not finding the solution - it isn't very clearly mentioned on the wiki. The problem is that even if you've installed NetworkManager, the daemon does not run by default. To fix this: sudo systemctl enable NetworkManager.service sudo systemctl start NetworkManager.service



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