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For me the solution was different. I used the command aptitude, when the graphical menu appeared I used / to get a pop-up search field and find all the linux-header, linux-image, linux-server versions and removed all but the one currently not used by pressing -. To find the current kernel version I used uname -r. Finally I installed a newer version of ...


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You can try yes | program or dpkg-reconfigure debconf


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After I tried many options of aptitude and the ways friends suggested in their posts, I came across a incredible option of aptitude: -f Try hard to fix the dependencies of broken packages, even if it means ignoring the actions requested on the command line. This corresponds to the configuration item Aptitude::CmdLine::Fix-Broken. Using ...


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It looks like you have broken dependencies to the extent that APT is unable to resolve conflicts. You may need to temporarily remove some packages or install unwanted packages. It may help to temporarily disable non-official package sources. Edit /etc/apt/sources.list or /etc/apt/sources.list.d/* to comment out Wingide and other non-official package sources ...


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I had the same issue with a recent Kali 1.1.0 VM install on Fusion 7.1.1. Here's what sorted me out: apt-update aptitude reinstall coreutils mv /usr/bin/readline /usr/bin/readline.old (leaves GNU /bin/readline as available, trash once completed) update-grub sed -i 's/BUSYBOX=y/BUSYBOX=n/' /etc/initramfs-tools/initramfs.conf update-initramfs -u reboot I ...


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This usually happens if another automated process has locked the apt database at the time you are running your command interactively. Most likely candidates for this (by Ubuntu package name): unattended-upgrades cron-apt but other candidates exist. These are scheduled using cron in most cases. Check out /etc/crontab, files in ...


4

You probably need to re-install the JDK explicitly: sudo apt-get install --reinstall openjdk-7-jdk openjdk-7-jre openjdk-7-jre-headless That will restore the contents of /usr/lib/jvm/. As it stands I reckon apt-get thinks the JDK is installed, even though you removed the files manually; so when you asked it to re-install, it figured it didn't need to do ...


0

Try an alias in the .bashrc file. It only works when logged in to the account that the file corresponds to. The syntax of an alias is: alias newcommand='command1; command2; command3' So your line might look a bit like this: alias apt-get='firstcommand; apt-get' Or this: alias apt-get='firstcommand && apt-get' With the second, apt-get will only ...


1

The error message is produced by apt-listbugs. If you purge that package (for now), you should be able to use aptitude or apt-get again... You can then try re-installing apt-listbugs from the LMDE repositories, but you should make sure that all its dependencies are LMDE versions as well. You can use apt-show-versions to determine where your packages are ...


3

There are two causes but in your case is that you have configured multiarch to ask for i386 packages while that repository is amd64 exclusive. The same would be happened if you set arm64 or any other architecture as foreign architecture with dpkg. There are three ways to go: If the repository should have amd64 packages, contact the maintainer and let them ...


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EDIT: Note that I'm talking only about PID 1 because I can't english and thought that you want to check up on your primary init process. Change that to the unit you're interested in. I'm sure systemd will spit PID out for you somehow. Or if not, ps ax |grep [commandname] will do it. You'll likely need to adjust the time difference between uptime and process ...


1

First determine where is apt-get using whereis apt-get; I will assume it's in /usr/sbin/apt-get Now mv /usr/sbin/apt-get /usr/sbin/apt-get2 Then create a file in /usr/bin/apt-get with this content: #!/bin/bash commands to run before apt-get apt-get2 "$@" now chmod +x /usr/bin/apt-get Better way as muru says, You can Just create apt-get script in ...


2

You can use an "alias" in the .bashrc file. For examle, put that in your root .bashrc file: alias apt-get='echo blahblah && apt-get' Command line arguments will be added automatically to the end of the alias. Just replace echo blahblah by the command you need. But in this case it only works when you're executing comands as root (not sudo).


0

apt-get autoremove or the aptitude equivalent removes all packages except the ones that have been installed explicitly (by selecting them in a package manager, or with apt-get install PACKAGENAME) and their dependencies. It doesn't know what packages might be important. The manual/auto distinction can be very useful but you need to nudge it a bit. Declare ...


0

apt-get install docker.io It's simple like that.


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As is often the case in matters such as these, the ArchWiki is your go-to about detailed information: here (addage: those with the best documentation shall eventually carry the day) Two, no three, items about network managers, the first being the only important one: Make sure only one is installed/active. If more than one is active your system will seem ...


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from this answer http://askubuntu.com/a/485293 DISCLAIMER: I'm not sure what implications this will have on my overall package setup or cause any problems with upgrades down the line. manually force the installed status for multiarch-support: nano /var/lib/dpkg/status find the the line starting with Package: something like: Package: multiarch-support ...


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You should probably look at the output of dpkg --get-selections | grep python to see all the installed python packages. There are a few packages for various different releases that may be installed on a system. Keep in mind that python is in the standard selections, so fully removing it will also remove other 'standard' packages like reportbug.


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It turned out that the additional package python-minimal had python installed. One does then not only have to do: sudo apt-get remove python but also: sudo apt-get remove python-minimal


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Unfortunately, I have no Debian at hand to test, but anyway: I think you did not really uninstall python. Package 'python2.7' is not installed, so not removed only means that a package python2.7 is not installed. But perhaps the name is different. which python says /usr/bin/python. That is a clear sign that you have python installed. Here is the official ...


2

The more general approach is to compare the two source packages corresponding to the version you're upgrading from and the version you're upgrading to. To find the former you may need to look through the snapshots; the latter should be available from your archive. Then run debdiff on the two .dsc files. Here's an example, comparing stella 4.1.1-1 (the ...


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You can download the source code from the Debian repositories using: apt-get source <PACKAGE> It will download 3 files, a .dsc that describes the package, a .orig.tar.gz that contains the source code, and a .diff.gz that contains the changes. This will work if in /etc/apt/sources.list/ you have included deb-src entries, for example: deb ...


5

Whenever a package is installed automatically by apt-get because it's a dependency of some other package, apt-get notes that fact; then if it notices that nothing depends on such a package any more, it will suggest that the package be removed. This is particularly useful for libraries. That's all that's meant by "no longer required": apt-get doesn't know ...


1

Volatile was discontinued with Squeeze; the replacement is suite-updates (in your case, wheezy-updates) on the standard mirrors: deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian wheezy-updates main You can add contrib non-free if necessary.


0

thank you for your answer when i run dpkg -a --configure it still error Setting up dahdi-dkms (1:2.2.1+dfsg-1ubuntu3) ... Removing old dahdi-2.2.1+dfsg-1ubuntu3 DKMS files... Deleting module version: 2.2.1+dfsg-1ubuntu3 completely from the DKMS tree. Done. Loading new dahdi-2.2.1+dfsg-1ubuntu3 DKMS files... First Installation: checking all ...


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The reason that every apt-get installation reports the problem with nfs-common is that apt-get is trying to recover from a previous problematic installation of nfs-common. If you run "dpkg -l nfs-common", the first two characters will show a state other than 'ii' (not sure what, but an error state of some sort). The root problem appears to be: ...


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I don't know of a way to do all you're asking for with aptitude or apt, but apt-src provides apt's features for source packages: apt-src update apt-src install package apt-src upgrade will respectively update the information on available packages, install package's source code, and upgrade the source code if necessary. Other options are available to ...


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The "Description Language" field contains the language code for any available translation you have downloaded. These are stored in ...Translation-lang files in /var/lib/apt/lists (where lang is the language code). apt-get downloads the appropriate Translation files for the language it's run in; thus for example sudo LANG=fr_FR.UTF-8 apt-get update will ...


11

If stdout is not a tty (i.e. it's a regular file or a pipe) and if no --quiet option has been specified, apt-cache acts as if you had passed it --quiet=1. A workaround is to pass it a --quiet=0 option. $ apt-cache --quiet=0 policy foo 2>&1 | grep . N: Unable to locate package foo


3

A "better" solution would be to use a script utility: script -c "apt-cache policy foo" /dev/null | grep . That way it intercepts all the output and forwards it to the stdout. The only drawback is that you need to install the script if you don't have it yet. In ubunty it's provided by bsdutils package.


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If you run strace apt-cache policy foo 2>&1 command, you can see the line ioctl(1, SNDCTL_TMR_TIMEBASE or SNDRV_TIMER_IOCTL_NEXT_DEVICE or TCGETS, {B38400 opost isig icanon echo ...}) = 0 Because that command manipulates the 1(stdout), 1 is not written to stdout anymore. And if you redirect 2 to 1, you lost both of them. Edit: Here is a some code ...


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There seems to be some cheaty behavior for redirections in apt-cache. But we can cheat a cheater by swapping stdout and stderr! Try this one, it should work: apt-cache policy foo 3>&1 1>&2 2>&3 3>&- | grep .


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There's a package for that ;-). As well as cron-apt, which can be configured to perform certain upgrades automatically, another useful package is unattended-upgrades which is designed to safely apply security updates automatically. Beyond that, as Erathiel says it's not safe to run dist-upgrade automatically, but it's safe enough to run it manually every ...


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sudo apt-get dist-upgrade is very safe to run as it won't do anything to the system, instead stopping to ask for your confirmation ;) You would have to add a -y switch, which is intended for unattended upgrades and makes apt assume that you always answer 'yes' to questions: sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade. The man page states that If an undesirable ...


0

Apache 2.2 and PHP 5.3 were the versions available in Debian Squeeze (Debian 6). Your /etc/apt/sources.list points to both Squeeze and Jessie (Debian 8), so when you asked to install phpmyadmin, apt-get automatically picked the latest acceptable version and its dependencies; these were taken from Jessie. To avoid this in future, you need to remove the ...


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Is there any chance to install this package? There is always a chance to install the package. At worst, you can go find it on http://packages.debian.org/ and download it and install it with dpkg -i. I don't know why you got this problem though. As you said, all of the sources in /etc/apt/sources.list are http, not https. Did you check ...


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There's no general answer. Sometimes you can find more information on a dependency in a package's description; this is more often true for "Recommends:" or "Suggests:" rather than full-blown "Depends:", to help users decide whether or not to install the weak dependency. Another source of information can be a package's changelog; that will sometimes indicate ...


2

The package maintainer lists the dependencies for a package when they create the specifications file. Looking at the list of what debianutils is it seems they use it to aid in the installation of the package, but yes, you would need to dig deep to find why it is a dependency. I'll bet you could find the usage of these tools in the ./configure script of the ...


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You can add a hook for the dpkg command. Create a file /etc/dpkg/dpkg.cfg.d/my_hook (create the directory if it doesn't exist) containing pre-invoke=/usr/local/sbin/dpkg-pre-hook The program /usr/local/sbin/dpkg-pre-hook is executed before dpkg performs an operation. The environment variable DPKG_HOOK_ACTION contains the action that dpkg is performing: ...


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Petra is based on Ubuntu 13.10, Saucy Salamander. The Saucy files were kept around on http://archive.ubuntu.com until a few days ago; they are now available on http://old-releases.ubuntu.com. If you really want to continue using Petra, you should replace "archive" with "old-releases" in your /etc/apt/sources.list configuration file. There hasn't been any ...



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