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Make a wrapper script around /usr/bin/gpgv. Supply the pathname to the wrapper script as the value of Dir::Bin::gpg (using apt-get --option). Have the wrapper script examine the output and exit status of gpgv, and communicate failure back to the toplevel script somehow (I suggest using kill to send a signal).


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apt routines are called whenever a system update is made (e.g. with Ubuntu's Update Manager). Any packages downloaded this way are kept for until you explicitly purge the, as you do when calling apt-get clean. If disk space is at a premium, and your update manager runs automatically every day at e.g 8:00, you can set up a cron job to run at 8:30 to do the ...


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I'm no expert but this should work: sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list Copy and paste the following line into the nano window: deb http://download.virtualbox.org/virtualbox/debian wheezy contrib Then: sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install virtualbox-4.3 Here is the official webpage.


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There is no package containing a vncserver-x11 binary in Ubuntu (or Debian). You can always check the Ubuntu Package Search to find files inside packages. A vncserver-x11 binary is part of RealVNC. You can download Debian-compatible installers for RealVNC from their website, which are likely to work on Ubuntu. The "generic installers" will probably work ...


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dpkg --search do not show /etc/nsswitch.conf because it is not registered as conffile so it is a bit of a special case. For example dpkg -S /etc/deluser.conf can be used to identify package that owns /etc/deluser.conf file. With path omitted dpkg --search nsswitch.conf actually show results. I also like dlocate utility which is very helpful to find which ...


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This appears to be Ubuntu bug #1236951. See the link for workarounds and the status of a fix.


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You can run apt-get install -f. If this doesn't fix your system, then something is really wrong, and a fix might be to remove the TeX related packages and try again.


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The -t option just remove the pinning preferences of apt, and sets the selected release with a 990 priority, the equivalent to this: Package: * Pin: release a=testing # for testing Pin-Priority: 900 This priority isn't enough to force a package downgrade. To force a package downgrade you need 1000 or more priority for the release you are trying to ...


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The easier way is using the release option on apt, example: sudo apt-get install tmux/stable or, in case you are using the name of the release instead of the tier (ie. squeeze, jeesie, sid instead of stable, testing, unstable) you should use that name instead: sudo apt-get install tmux/squeeze This will install the latest version available in the ...


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You can run the command apt-cache to find what versions of a give package are available: $ apt-cache showpkg libsocket-perl And then based on that output, steer apt-get into picking a particular version like so: $ apt-get install <package name>=<version> For example: $ apt-get install libsocket-perl=2.014-1_amd64 You can do this with an ...


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You have a PPA that is causing problems, the best course of action is remove it and downgrade the packages: sudo sed -i 's/deb\ http:\/\/ppa\.launchpad\.net/#deb\ http:\/\/ppa\.launchpad\.net/' /etc/apt/sources.list{,.d/*.list} sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get -f install libreoffice-base-drivers_ libreoffice-base-core/precise-updates ...


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You need to download and reinstall the linux-headers-3.5.0-54 package. The issue here is that the package is only available in precise, which your sources don't do reference anymore. For this I would recommend download manually the package instead of adding the precise repository and reinstalling the package using dpkg to then proceed to remove it and ...


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The answer is simple. Your system is misconfigured. You did a local install of base Python packages. This is a no-no. You should install the base binary Python packages from your distributions repository. In particular, your Python installation is looking for files like lib/python2.7/site.py and lib/python2.7/sysconfig.py in /usr/local, but these files are ...


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I found a way to solve this issue by simply removing the idle-python2.7 package: sudo apt-get remove idle-python2.7 as stated here.


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You have a bundle of problems, so lets start for the most important: Your version of Mint is obsolete. There are some improvements in newer versions of apt, found in recent version of Linux Mint that prevent problems like this: E: Encountered a section with no Package: header E: Problem with MergeList ...


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Note to myself and others: The solution I use now is aptly. From their website: aptly is a swiss army knife for Debian repository management: it allows to mirror remote repositories, manage local package repositories, take snapshots, pull new versions of packages along with dependencies, publish snapshots as Debian repositories. So far my experiences ...


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Aptitude is more aggressive at the time of solving dependencies, in fact it creates several recipes to solve the dependencies. What you probably did, you tried to install/remove/upgrade, aptitude detected some broken dependencies and asked you if you accept the proposed fix. You didn't noticed (pressing YYYY) but aptitude did asked you and you accepted the ...


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You could use debmirror in debmarshal mode which seems to keep snapshots of release of packages allowing you to rollback if necessary. Seems simple enough according to the wiki. If that's too complex, mirrors normally don't delete the packages when they are updated, so using a browser you should able to redownload the packages, if necessary. Also, apt keeps ...


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Searches for this turn up a couple of things to try. Re-install python Found this link: Broken python (2.7) after manually building and installing python 2.6. The suggestion was to re-install like so: $ sudo apt-get --reinstall install python python-support Make sure the software update app has internet enabled Found this link: more package dependency ...


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Try: sudo apt-get --only-upgrade install <package> From man apt-get: --only-upgrade Do not install new packages; when used in conjunction with install, only-upgrade will install upgrades for already installed packages only and ignore requests to install new packages. Configuration Item: ...


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You can download the packages but not install them. Try: sudo apt-get -d upgrade packageName Where -d or --download will download package files but does not install them.


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These are called reverse dependencies. apt-rdepends -r libplrpc-perl | less should do what you want. This shows the reverse dependencies of the specified package, and then the reverse dependencies of those reverse dependencies, and so on, in recursive fashion. libplrpc-perl doesn't have any reverse dependencies, so perhaps a better choice is ...


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Why it is installed: aptitude why libplrpc-perl What depends on this package: aptitude search '~i~Dlibplrpc-perl' What would happen, if libplrpc-perl is removed: aptitude -s purge libplrpc-perl


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Does this do what you want/need? aptitude -v --show-summary=all-packages why <package>


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I haven't played much with multiarch systems, so there may well be a better way than what I'm proposing here. I haven't tested my proposal, I'm not sure that it doesn't run against some peculiarity of multiarch. You can use equivs to create dummy packages for dependencies only. Create a control file with equivs-control make.control Edit the control file: ...


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Oneiric (for Linux Mint) is obsolete. http://www.linuxmint.com/oldreleases.php


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The thing that helped me was: https://smyl.es/how-to-fix-ubuntudebian-apt-get-404-not-found-package-repository-errors-saucy-raring-quantal-oneiric-natty/ Basically updating the lists to use old-releases.ubuntu.com: sudo sed -i -e 's/archive.ubuntu.com\|security.ubuntu.com/old-releases.ubuntu.com/g' /etc/apt/sources.list sudo sed -i -e ...


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apt-get will complain if you run it from a script. Try with: export DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive sudo add-apt-repository ppa:webupd8team/y-ppa-manager sudo apt-get -q -y update sudo apt-get -q -y install yad


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I don't know of a one-stop command line solution, although all the tools exist (apt-cache depends --installed, apt-cache rdepends --installed --recurse, apt-mark showmanual, dpigs, etc.). It would be possible to hack together a command line script that could attempt to find large packages with few manually installed reverse dependencies. Here's the proof of ...


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It's a bug on apt-get, that is not sending the correct GET headers, so the server answers with 404. For example, telnet to the server mirror.cs50.net at port 80 (HTTP), and enter the following (emulating an apt-get request): GET /appliance50/2014/debs/dists/trusty/main/binary-i386/./appliance50_2014-0_i386.deb HTTP/1.1 User-Agent: Debian APT-HTTP/1.3 ...


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I wrote the following simple script to automatically retrieve the original file from the right Debian package and diff the current file against it: https://gitorious.org/mybin/mybin/source/master:debdiffconf Use it as follows: debdiffconf FILE



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