Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I deleted every directed labeled python Don't do this. Never modify, move or delete a file that was installed by the package manager: your modifications are likely to break removal, upgrades, installations of other packages, or to be overridden on an upgrade. The directories /bin, /lib, /sbin, /usr (except for /usr/local) and most of /var belong to the ...


1

Get rid of all entries under /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ except for getdeb.list official-package-repositories.list I have only those two on my Linux Mint 17 VM client system (and virtualbox.list in addition to that on my host). You e.g. move those files away instead of immediately deleting them: sudo mkdir /root/tmp_sources sudo mv ...


1

This only applies to commands specified by the --pre-invoke and --post-invoke options, not when the commands are set in the configuration. This can be demonstrated by putting your echo command into a script: # cat > /tmp/pre-invoke.sh <<'EOF' #!/bin/sh echo This is testhook. Current action is $DPKG_HOOK_ACTION; exit 0 EOF # chmod +x ...


0

Several of your Linux distributions utilities rely on python to do various tasks. By removing the executables you have broken it in a way that it will not be be able to repair itself with commands like apt-get install -f. More modern versions of distros are in the process of moving from Python2 to Python3 and require both to be installed. You should restore ...


0

Have a look at Debian's apt-build package.


0

apt-get as well aptitude keep track of which packages were installed automatically via dependencies. At least in aptitude you can list all packages not installed via dependencies with aptitude search '!~M'. Unfortunately this does usually not count for packages installed at system installation time. Also apt-get install removes the "automatically installed" ...


3

Strangely the code works when I run it from an interactive Python prompt. At any rate, this bug report points to a solution(?)1: Add a call to apt_pkg.init_system() as documented here (or do import apt as well): #!/usr/bin/env python import sys, apt_pkg apt_pkg.init_system() res = apt_pkg.version_compare(sys.argv[1], sys.argv[2]) if res < 0: ...


5

From man apt apt(8) apt(8) NAME apt - Advanced Package Tool


0

Just update your packages with sudo apt-get install update In most cases it will solve the issues.If any unmet dependency issues are arises use this one sudo apt-get -f install


0

Solved. I had to run openvas-mkcert-client -n om -i which I found from this post - this was a different issue but the same error message. Then I could rebuild the NVT cache: # openvasmd --progress --rebuild -v Rebuilding NVT cache... done. Checking the log now shows it is successful: # tail /var/log/openvas/openvasmd.log md main: INFO:2014-12-05 ...


0

I think the problem is either apt-get upgrade or apt-get dist-upgrade has updated the kernel image. However, the new kernel only take effect upon reboot. The version of udev package requires that new kernel. So it is warning me that this older image my system is currently running on does not work with the new udev and is refusing to install. I simply reboot ...


1

Here are the commands you need to run, if you just want to get it done: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:git-core/ppa -y sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install git git --version As of Dec 2014, I get git 2.2.0 that way, while the version in the Ubuntu Trusty repositories is 1.9.1.


0

You can use gdebi to install the Debian Steam installer made by Ghost Squad 57, available from Github. It gets around the issues raised by Valve's installer and has not encountered any issues on Wheezy.


-1

Try this: aptitude update aptitude install mysql-workbench


2

Well, from the apt-cache search linux-headers the cause should be obvious: Simply stated, the package isn't available in Ubuntu 14.10. You should instead install linux-headers-3.16.0-24, linux-headers-3.16.0-25 or save yourself from all problems and use linux-headers-generic which is a meta-package that depends on the latest available kernels (going by your ...


-1

I have both as an alias in .bashrc alias update='su -c "'"apt-get update && apt-get upgrade"'"' And this to remove cache and dependencies. alias cln='su -c "'"apt-get autoremove && apt-get autoclean && apt-get clean"'"'


0

I guess there isn't an easiest way than creating an alias, but if you want to simplify this you could do Ctrl+r and type update, then you could be able to see that line you executed in a certain time, then press return to execute it again. prompt:~$ Ctrl+r (reverse-i-search)`upda': sudo apt-get update; sudo apt-get upgrade


1

You can simply download the .deb and install it with dpkg -i file.deb. However, this will be a one-time install and you will not get updates for this package as part of the normal apt-get update && apt-get upgrade process. If you want to get them, you will have to add the Utopic repositories to your sources.list and use /etc/apt/preferences to ...


1

APT doesn't know anything about your manually-installed software. If you installed Emacs under /usr/local (the default location), that installation is completely independent from the Emacs installation under /usr managed by APT. Running emacs will run /usr/local/bin/emacs (your manual installation); running /usr/bin/emacs will run the Emacs installed by APT ...


3

Apt-get does not have a "safeupgrade" command. Are you thinking of "aptitude safe-upgrade"? That aside, apt-get only "knows" things because the package system maintains a database of all the changes the package subsystem programs makes. When you download source and build it yourself and then install it, that is not done using the package subsystem so none ...


1

For those who don't want to install aptitude: sudo dpkg -P $(dpkg -l | awk '/^rc/ { print($2) }')


3

You should take a look at apt-get install --reinstalland specify --force-confmiss as option - but this only reinstalls missing config files. apt-get --purge before will remove those config files. Explained here: http://askubuntu.com/a/67028/329633 and here: http://www.microkwen.com/2008/09/16/force-apt-get-to-reinstall-config-files/ and here: ...


0

apt-get purge ibus-anthy anthy anthy-common libanthy0 \ ibus-mozc mozc-data mozc-server mozc-utils-gui \ ^ibus.+ gir1.2-ibus.+ im-config python-ibus libpyzy-1.0.0 \ libsunpinyin3 sunpinyin-data Of course, because you are telling apt-get to install any package that starts with ibus and gir1.2-ibus. The + at the end of the package name tells apt-get to ...


0

Just filter the output of apt-get update && apt-get -s -V -u upgrade to have only the preferred information in your log. Most likely, you'll need the beautiful part after the line ... The following packages will be upgraded: ... that has few spaces in the beginning.



Top 50 recent answers are included