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I followed the answer by the letter and it just corrupted my sources.list file!! E: The list of sources could not be read.


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Try to install the keyring: sudo apt-get install --allow-unauthenticated linuxmint-keyring Then: sudo rm -rf /var/lib/apt/lists/* apt update sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade


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You can use... echo password | sudo -S recover.sh Password being your sudo password. From sudo manpage.. -S, --stdin Write the prompt to the standard error and read the password from the standard input instead of using the terminal device. And second method is sudo -S <<< password apt-get install pkg_name


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If you don't want to enter password manually you use -A option of sudo -A, --askpass Normally, if sudo requires a password, it will read it from the user's terminal. If the -A (askpass) option is specified, a (possibly graphi‐ cal) helper program is executed to read the user's password and output the ...


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Ok so after doing lot of search what i have resolved it. In dpkg folder, i have file named lock. I have changed the permission of the file and also for dpkg folder. Then i run apt-get install -f now i will be able to install any software.


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You will get that error when you were installed 2 different architecture or version of same package. If you still get error with apt-get -f install try using synaptic application ( on left column broken packages ) you can make it okay .


0

The 'UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook' contains a high-level overview of package management in general, it's history and package management of RHEL, Ubuntu(/Debian), SUSE, Solaris, HP-UX and AIX. These sections are not 'in-depth' however, it is a well citable work and a good read in general for everything concerning UNIX systems and their ...


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For debian/apt, I would recommend chapters 5 and 6 of the Debian Administrator's Handbook, which is distributed with a permissive license: Packaging System: Tools and Fundamental Principles Maintenance and Updates: The APT Tools


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I had the same issue; you can fix it by updating first: # apt-get update


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Using dpkg, you can install multiple packages in a single operation; this will allow installation of packages with a dependency loop. Assuming you have the appropriate packages downloaded: dpkg -i libc6_*deb multiarch-support_*deb libgcc1_*deb will install libc6, multiarch-support and libgcc1.


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This is a jessie container. Later below, there is the 'get' operation that I ran on my regular Debian Unstable box. rrs@learner:~$ machinectl start jessie 2016-04-21 / 23:06:53 ♒♒♒ ☺ rrs@learner:~$ machinectl login jessie Connected to machine jessie. Press ^] three times within 1s to exit session. Debian GNU/Linux 8 learner pts/0 learner login: root ...


3

You can do this in two separate steps: Install the package with dpkg. sudo dpkg -i packagename.deb That created missing dependencies. apt-get can fix missing dependencies automatically. sudo apt-get -f install That should also automatically finish configuring the original package. (So you will not likely need to run sudo dpkg --configure -a yourself.) ...


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No, apt_preferences doesn't permit filtering by package priority, only by name, version and origin (for several meanings of origin). Mixing Debian releases wouldn't work anyway, because of dependencies. Many optional/extra packages in testing require more recent versions of required/important/standard packages than the ones in stable. If you want to have a ...


2

You should be able to work it out. Please follow documentation here: http://www.researchut.com/tools/apt-offline And you should only use the newer 1.7 version, from Debian Backports. I recently pushed it there. It solves a lot of bugs there were present in apt-offline from Debian Jessie. http://www.researchut.com/blog/apt-offline-debian-jessie-backports


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I'll assume that you are talking about building/compiling C/C++ software on Ubuntu. This isn't clear from your question. On a modern Linux distribution with a package management system (which includes virtually all the major distributions), you should always use the package management system to install software whenever possible. In a Linux distribution ...


0

If the software you're trying to build uses a decent build system, it should be possible to tell it where to find things it depends on. - That is if it doesn't find it automatically, which it should. - You'll probably need -dev/-devel versions of the packages to get the stuff your software needs to build.


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You need to remove google chrome sudo apt-get remove google-chrome-stable sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/google-chrome.list* sudo apt-get -f install Add the key wget -q -O - https://dl-ssl.google.com/linux/linux_signing_key.pub | sudo apt-key add - change the sources.list entry for Google Chrome sudo sh -c 'echo "deb [arch=amd64] ...


4

The mdadm package recommends a MTA so as to send an email if a disk fails. It's a useful feature, so I recommend that you do ensure that email is working. Postfix is overkill for a system that does nothing but send emails to a relay. I recommend adding nullmailer to your list of packages, and configure it appropriately. Since you're doing an automated ...


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You can pre-seed the selections using debconf-set-selections debconf-set-selections <<< "postfix postfix/mailname string your.hostname.com" debconf-set-selections <<< "postfix postfix/main_mailer_type string 'Local Only'" apt-get install -y postfix Appendix B. Automating the installation using preseeding : ...


2

Both apt-get and aptitude are convenient front-ends for the underlying dpkg command, the Debian package system. They (pre-)handle stuff like dependency and conflict resolution and package download, before they invoke dpkg with explicit instructions to install downloaded *.deb files, or to remove packages and their dependency, or to automatically ...


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According to packages_ubuntu you need to add trusty main universe repo to the sources.list : Example : sudo gedit /etc/apt/sources.list deb http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu trusty main universe sudo apt-get update First , you need to fix broken package: sudo dpkg --configure -a sudo apt-get install -f sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get autoremove ...


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Probably, not until Debian bug #754103 is resolved: apt: support option to wait for lockfile Reported by: Michael Prokop Date: Mon, 7 Jul 2014 15:06:01 UTC Severity: wishlist Found in version apt/1.0.5


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Solution 1 Run the following command, replacing package-name with the name of the package: sudo apt-get -o Dpkg::Options::="--force-confmiss" install --reinstall package-name Solution 2 If you have .deb package then go to that directory where package is exist and run, dpkg -i --force-confmiss package-name.deb


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You should mv the file out of the way: mv /etc/bluetooth/main.conf /etc/bluetooth/main.conf.old apt-get -o DPkg::options::=--force-confmiss --reinstall install bluez I don't know if you can get apt to overwrite an existing config file, that's why you should move it out of the way first.


0

Submit a bug report to acestream, their acestream-engine package is broken. python2.7-apsw does not exist in debian sid. the package they should be depending upon is called python-apsw. Alternatively (or additionally), you can use the debian equivs package to build a dummy python2.7-apsw package that has no contents but depends on python-apsw Package: ...


0

What about apt-get update && \ apt-get upgrade && \ apt-get dist-upgrade && \ do-release-upgrade ?


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Note: this is general advice for any application that needs an earlier, superseded or in other way eccentric library. The libnss3 library and the upwork application are perfectly good examples. 1. Fix your system OK, first thing, undo what you have done. If you have used any apt-pin's then remove them (for libnss3) and then do: apt-get install libnss3 ...


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Hi its best to first check the repo and then do the same below may help you.. cat /etc/apt/sources.list deb http://http.kali.org/kali sana main non-free contrib deb http://security.kali.org/kali-security/ sana/updates main contrib non-free apt-get update apt-get dist-upgrade reboot


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According to debian-administration some packages are being "kept back" beacause: There we can see four packages haven't been upgraded, even though newer packages are available. This is because two new packages were introduced, and these upgrades depend upon it. To fix this you must run : apt-get dist-upgrade


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The apt-get upgrade command you have used will only upgrade packages that need no new packages as dependencies. You can use apt-get dist-upgrade to include new packages in the set of candidates. Be aware though that using dist-upgrade will also delete packages that have been obsoleted by other, possibly newer, packages.


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The repository is signed using SHA1 hash which is no longer suported by APT. I don't know how to fix that other than downgrading apt to stable version.


0

While this is a nice collection of tools, to which I'd add the KDE / QT Filelight, which is similar to other gui disk space usage tools, it's not the literal answer to the topic title. If you take the question of this thread literally, that is, what are the largest packages in your system, as a rule, they are: The libreoffice suite of packages, which isn't ...


4

The madison command was added in apt 0.5.20. It produces output that's similar to a then-existing tool called madison which was used by Debian server administrators. Several of these tools had names which were common female forenames, I don't know if there's a specific history behind that. The madison tool no longer exists but there's a partial ...


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From man apt-cache: apt-cache’s madison command attempts to mimic the output format and a subset of the functionality of the Debian archive management tool, madison. It displays available versions of a package in a tabular format. Unlike the original madison, it can only display information for the architecture for which APT has retrieved ...


1

The guys from MySQL replied and declared this as a bug. The following is their message: Hi, Thanks for the report. This seems to be a bug in the new version of mysql-apt-config. In your /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mysql.list file, the line: deb http://repo.mysql.com/apt//debian/ jessie mysql-5.6 mysql-5.7-dmr mysql-5.7 connector-python-2.0 ...


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-Hello! I hope you can try to get the ISO here, http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=08111 on this site could have good results when I had some problems for packages ...


0

I recently found myself in a similar situation. I needed a way to get xorg (just xorg, not the full ubuntu-desktop) onto an offline Ubuntu Server. I figured, “Hey, Ubuntu Desktop has it, it must be on the DVD.” Sadly, it turns out the common suggestion to use apt-cdrom to install packages offline from the Desktop Edition DVD is a bit outdated, or at least ...


0

backup repository list cp /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.bak Add the Kali rolling repository to the list of repositories using : cat << EOF > /etc/apt/sources.list deb http://http.kali.org/kali kali-rolling main non-free contrib EOF Then comment the following line: deb http://http.kali.org/kali sana main non-free contrib deb ...


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http://docs.kali.org/general-use/kali-linux-sources-list-repositories Kali sana (2.0) is Retired as you can see from above kali doc link. To upgrade to rolling refer to this documentation: https://www.kali.org/news/kali-linux-rolling-edition-2016-1/ Where you will find the section "Transitioning From Kali 2.0 to Kali Rolling" As per their docs: ...


4

The algorithm is described in much detail in the apt_preferences man page. In short, apt calculates a score for every version it knows about, based on command line options, configuration, and already installed packages. It then installs the version with the highest score. You can tweak things by specifying explicit scores for explicit sources, as described ...


1

A simple search reveals that the package is maintained on github, but the installation procedure suggested there is incomplete and contains assumptions. Use the following commands: release=0.54 wget https://github.com/mdom/dategrep/releases/download/$release/dategrep-standalone-big sudo cp dategrep-standalone-big /usr/local/bin/dategrep sudo chmod 755 ...


2

Use dpkg -L dateutils to find out what has been installed. In specific, you should look for binaries in /bin, /sbin etc.


1

cron typically runs things in a fairly minimal environment (man 5 crontab to see what exactly), which probably doesn't have enough in its path for this. If you want to see what is in the path, you can always run printenv > /tmp/cron_env from (presumably at a time in the near future) to see. Generally you can just define an updated PATH in your crontab ...


0

If apt-get is run with a different language, its output will look different. In principle it would be better to use a command like apt-get dist-upgrade -s --quiet=2 | grep ^Inst. It could then be piped through wc -l to generate a number. This is the approach used by apticron. The abbreviation Inst is documented in the apt-get manual pages for all ...


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I had a similar problem: dpkg: dependency problems prevent removal of libefl: evas-loaders depends on libefl. dpkg: error processing package libefl (--remove): dependency problems - not removing Errors were encountered while processing: libefl Disabling the PPA of englightenment fixed it for me.



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