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0

If you want the list of all dependencies sorted by name you can use this command apt-rdepends --show=depends apt | grep -v '^ ' | grep -v apt| sort For the package apt, the output will be debian-archive-keyring dpkg gcc-4.9-base gnupg gpgv install-info libacl1 libapt-pkg4.12 libattr1 libbz2-1.0 libc6 libgcc1 liblzma5 libpcre3 libreadline6 libselinux1 ...


0

tried it in fedora also...Same problem Simple: there is no problem on your machine. You're trying to fix a problem which does not exist, at least not where you're trying to fix it. As you know, when using a proxy, you change your network transaction from... YOU <===> INTERNET <===> TARGET ... to... YOU <===> INTERNET ...


0

If you do not care about this check, no matter for which mirror, just create a file in /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/ (e.g. name it 10no--check-valid-until) and put the option directly in there: Acquire::Check-Valid-Until "0"; After this, that will never be bothered again with the mentioned warning at all.


3

You can check /var/log/apt/history.log When you issue apt-get install, it records the command line as Commandline: record, and real packages installed as Install:


0

My guess is that your version of Debian only has quite an old version of ssdeep in its repositories and this version of ssdeep is not compatible with the current release of libfuzzy-dev. I suggest apt-get uninstall ssdeep, then install it (and libfuzzy-dev) 'manually' i.e. not via apt-get.


0

Ah, yes. The fun of dependencies, a necessary evil. You might want to try using dpkg instead of apt. In certain contexts debian packages are reluctant to install using gdebi or software center [also apt & synaptic] due to dependencies problem. In that case, you can install .deb file using following command, dpkg --force-all -i PackageName e.g. dpkg ...


0

You have to update the package index file (available packages) and then update the packages set (packages to install) based on the updated index file. During the first part of the trip from the offline machine to the online machine you can send the desynchronize package index file and the desynchronized package set. On the online machine, you can update ...


0

You can use dpkg -V <package> I test it and it works also on configuraton files. After modifying /etc/iceweasel/profile/bookmarks.html and running dpkg -V iceweasel, I obtain the following output ??5?????? c /etc/iceweasel/profile/bookmarks.html Note that only modified files are displayed and according to the dpkg man page, the output format is ...


0

To solve it, I had to remove the symlink in /etc/php5/cli/php.ini that points to ../fpm/php.ini. After that, all works as expected. I found the solution here.


0

The Debian buildd stats show that, at least on Intel or AMD-based PC platforms, the coverage is pretty much identical. (The stats cover unstable rather than Wheezy.) You'll find some 32-bit-only packages, and some 64-bit-only packages, but they are few and far between. Will a 32-bit linux OS work on modern desktops that are compatible with 64-bit? considers ...


0

Packages are available for nearly every platform, 32bit certainly has great coverage. The only thing you may wish to consider is that it may be faster to send 64bit instructions to the CPU then to send 32bit padded instructions to the CPU. But this depends a lot on your setup. Usually virtual machines should try to be the same as their host hardware. Real ...


0

You can generate a Packages file for the current directory fairly easily: dpkg-scanpackages . | tee Packages | gzip -9 > Packages.gz That will generate relative paths to the package files (which can be in subdirectories). All you have to do is point people at the top level directory with something like this in their sources.list: deb ...


0

Besides of the official repositories of the distributions, an user can add a repository for software outside of the regular packages of the distribution. Instead of installing a .deb (debian/Ubuntu), the user simply add a Personal Package Archive (PPA), and he could install, remove, update the packages using apt-get. For Debian/Ubuntu you can open an ...


0

apt-get install --no-download --reinstall --print-uris package-name


1

The following python script parse the output of apt-cache policy and generate the list of all installed packages with the output format Package<tab>Version<tab>Origin<tab>Suite apt-show-origins #!/usr/bin/env python # Should be written with python-apt # but for now parse the output of apt-cache policy import os import re command = ...


0

For example, if you want to list all the alternatives to nano run: apt-cache showpkg nano to determine that it provides the editor virtual package. Then run: aptitude search "?provides(editor)" | grep -v ":" to list all alternatives p deutex - composition tool for doom-style WAD files p edbrowse - ...


0

You can use /etc/apt/preferences to specify which versions you want on a per-package basis. To have the latest iceweasel version, use (at your own risk) the following configuration files: /etc/apt/preferences Package: iceweasel Pin: release a=experimental Pin-Priority: 1000 Package: * Pin: release a=testing Pin-Priority: 500 Package: * Pin: release ...


0

Check which packages the repository is publishing with this command: awk '$1 == "Package:" { if (a[$2]++ == 0) print $2; }'/var/lib/apt/lists/*ubuntuzilla*Packages There should be firefox-mozilla-build. If not, then the repository is not providing the package that you want to install.


0

As mentioned above even I had the same error and the second solution works perfectly as described by Mr.Ramesh $ sudo rm /var/lib/apt/lists/* -vf $ sudo apt-get clean $ sudo apt-get update $ sudo apt-get upgrade Works perfectly to clear out the mess created. Generally this error is caused due to network related issues.


1

Try this, its works for me : Add new repo in /etc/apt/sources.list: deb http://repo.linrunner.de/debian wheezy main sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install tlp tlp-rdw Hope this will work for you.


1

I found myself putting together pieces from the different answers, particularly Braiam's and muru's. In the end, I ended up with this oneliner, which gets me close enough to a start that I should be able to figure out the rest: dpkg-query --showformat '${Package}\n' -W | \ while read package; do \ apt-cache policy $package | grep -q wheezy/non-free ...


2

It's possible, but it's very difficult. If you really want to rebuild everything from source, you'll end up running into dependency loops which you will have to break. But if you want to persevere, instead of using apt-get build-dep you should look inside each source package's debian/control, and rebuild all the packages listed in Build-Depends and ...


1

Apt action track sorted by time|date can be found in log-file /var/log/apt/history.log where noted all your action with packets wherever you install, remove or update. For example one operation tracked similar to: Start-Date: 2015-02-13 01:15:14 Commandline: apt-get install sylfilter Install: libsylfilter0:amd64 (0.8-2, automatic), ...


1

Try the following command in your terminal sudo apt-get install linux-generic


0

My issue was somewhat similar. My /etc/apt/sources.list file did not contain any repo reading https. Yet, I could not install the package. The error I got when I ran the command sudo apt-get install apt-transport-https was this: Err http://ftp.us.debian.org/debian/ testing/main apt-transport-https amd64 1.0.9.5 404 Not Found [IP: 64.50.236.52 80] E: ...


2

-l is one of the options of dpkg-query, which has another option, -W (or --show). -W allows use to select an output format. You can try: dpkg-query --showformat '${Status}\t${Package}\t${Version}\t${Architecture}\t${Origin}\t${Section}\n' -W | column -ts $'\t' For example: $ dpkg-query --showformat ...


1

As well as apt-cache policy, described in Braiam's answer, you can use apt-show-versions and apt-forktracer. apt-show-versions by default will list all installed packages with the suite they come from, their version and whether they can be upgraded; for example afl:amd64/experimental *manually* upgradeable from 1.28b-1 to 1.36b-1 agedu:amd64/testing 9723-1 ...


2

You are looking for apt-cache policy output: ➜ ~ apt-cache policy skype skype:i386: Installed: 4.3.0.37-1 Candidate: 4.3.0.37-1 Version table: *** 4.3.0.37-1 0 100 /var/lib/dpkg/status ➜ ~ apt-cache policy irssi irssi: Installed: 0.8.17-1 Candidate: 0.8.17-1 Version table: *** 0.8.17-1 0 900 http://http.debian.net/debian/ ...


0

The nameserver configured in your /etc/resolv.conf is not in the same subnet as the server itself. If your gateway has no route to that subnet the nameserver is not reachable. Your interface configuration is not valid. Maybe your IP address should be 192.168.0.110 not 192.168.1.110. The IP address, the network address, the broadcast address und the gateway ...


0

In one of the ressouce cited by Lucas Malor, I found a script called populator which seem to be near the solution. If you set the packages selection variable to the list of all your packages PKGLIST=$(dpkg --get-selections | grep -v deinstall| cut -f1) you can then run the script and reinstall all packages but the system will probablaby have some problems. ...


1

we can use different mirrors for different architecture . # /etc/apt/sources.list deb [ arch=mipsel ] http://1.mirror.debian.org stable main deb [ arch=amd64 ] http://2.mirror.debian.org stable main then configure pinning by origin . # /etc/apt/preferences Package: * Pin: origin "2.mirror.debian.org" Pin-Priority: /* some small number */ we can set up ...


0

I use this on my lubuntu sudo add-apt-repository -y ppa:irie/blender sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install blender This is my screenshot when I install blender on lubuntu.


3

If I understand you correctly, you want to remove a package that other packages depend on, without removing those other packages as well. Bearing in mind this might not be a good idea, you can do this with. dpkg -r --force-depends foo for removal of a package (conf files are not removed). dpkg -P --force-depends foo for purge of a package (conf files ...


0

Thanks to Faheem, with his comment he put me on the right path to google the right things. It turns out that the problem was that the university had a file /etc/apt/preferences which included definition of priorities of stuff to be installed. Once I removed this, an upgrade with apt-get dist-upgrade happened alone.


1

Actually, is dpkg which thinks (rightly so) that your package isn't correctly installed, because the configuration was never done in first place (which is why it says "half-configured"). You must check your /var/cache/textadept directory (as stated in .postinst script), find and delete the package, so it downloads it correctly and it gets installed using ...


3

You'll have to close (or otherwise redirect) the standard input of the individual commands: #!/bin/bash apt-get purge -y nginx <&- apt-get install -y nginx <&- date Otherwise subsequent line are fed to the commands.


0

I'm guessing it's the same for Debian, but on Ubuntu, at least, the packages that are installed by default (when Debian/Ubuntu was first installed) don't have the automatically-installed mark. The libraries you're looking at were likely installed at the time of the Debian installation.


2

I think you might need to put this in your /etc/apt/sources.list file: deb http://http.debian.net/debian/ squeeze main contrib non-free deb-src http://http.debian.net/debian/ squeeze main contrib non-free deb http://http.debian.net/debian squeeze-lts main contrib non-free deb-src http://http.debian.net/debian squeeze-lts main contrib non-free Source: ...


1

Chromium is only available on amd64 and i386 in Debian, so it can’t be installed on your mini210s. It used to be available on armel in Debian Squeeze, and for a while on armhf, but it was removed for Wheezy in March 2013, probably because it was too difficult to provide adequate security support on ARM platforms... See the commit log for the exact removal ...



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