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7

apt-get dist-upgrade does nothing because your system is already up-to-date… for wheezy. You've instructed your system to follow wheezy, and that's what it does. To upgrade to another release, you need to change your package sources to point to that other release. Package sources are declared in the file /etc/apt/sources.list. Edit this file and change all ...


4

Open the terminal and type the following command: sed -i 's/wheezy/jessie/g' /etc/apt/sources.list apt-get update apt-get upgrade apt-get dist-upgrade apt-get autoremove apt-get clean apt-get dist-upgrade -f reboot


3

You can do this by combining both patterns in a single command-line argument: aptitude search '~N !-dbgsym$' This causes the search to look for packages with are both new and whose name doesn't match the -dbgsym$ regex. If the regex is added as a separate argument (aptitude search '~N' '!-dbgsym$'), packages match if they match either pattern.


0

I think it would work properly if you add the dns-namservers to your eth0 aswell, or by configuring your dhcp server/router to give the resolvers you want , while making sure in the first place that you can ping those adresses


2

In my case it was an issue of the configuration file /etc/dhcpcd.conf. It had an entry static domain_name_servers=192.168.1.1 and whenever the Ethernet was connected, resolvconf overwrote the nameserver in /etc/resolv.conf, breaking Internet access via domain names.


1

If using Debian stable, and you have a package you want updated, you can use backports, as seen in https://backports.debian.org/Instructions/ in short: add "deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian jessie-backports main" (after main, can also add contrib and non-free, if using them.) to your sources.list, which by default is /etc/apt/sources.list (as root, or ...


2

Different releases of Debian have different versions of tmux. Take a look at the package page for tmux. It seems that apt-get is looking at wheezy (a little old). The Debian releases-page shows how old: 2013 (and still being updated). By the way, you could be running Ubuntu or some other downstream distribution rather than Debian, but it's likely there ...


0

You have an outdated apt-get index. One of the dependent packages can no longer be found. You're on unstable so this ought to happen from time to time. Checking the files on that server reveals that the latest version of the file that apt-get install tries to fetch is liblua5.2-0_5.2.4-1.1_amd64.deb (updated on the 3rd of June 2016), not liblua5.2-0_5.2.4-...


2

The problem with a call like this is that bad data in the packages.txt file can cause breakage. In this case you have an entry in the file -info. This means the command you are running will look like apt install pkg1 pkg2 ... -info pkg10 pkg11 ... The -info will be interpreted as an option to the apt command. It doesn't like this and so reports Command ...


2

Two lines should be enough for raspberrian (doc), assuming you are using the version based on debian wheezy (check with lsb_release -a): deb http://archive.raspbian.org/raspbian wheezy main contrib non-free deb-src http://archive.raspbian.org/raspbian wheezy main contrib non-free "after changing sources.list don't forget to sudo apt-get update" (thanks ...


0

It sounds like you have not properly setup /etc/apt/preferences. The following will prevent anything from being installed from jessie-backports expect what tell it to install (such as the backported kernel). You will still have issues if the specified packages require other packages from backports that are not listed. Package: * Pin: release n=jessie-...


0

I think virtualbox create new list folder so you can remove it using: sudo rm -rf /etc/apt/sources.list.d/virtualbox.list sudo rm -rf /etc/apt/sources.list.d/virtualbox.list~ then run : sudo apt-get update


1

The other answer is incomplete, and not entirely correct. dpkg has a "hold" state. Essentially, this state means you do not want the system to upgrade the package in the given state, even if there is a newer version. This state can only be set manually. To figure out whether you have any packages in this state, run dpkg -l|grep ^h. If that produces any ...


3

That message indicates that apt didn't changed anything and the broken packages it tried to solve were kept in the same state. In this case "held" is used as "keep". If I had to reword it it would say: Unable to correct the problems, packages are left unchanged.


1

There are several probabilities: Your list can be not updated, use apt-get update. You should also check if apt-cache policy list all the repositories. Is probable that the package isn't available in the repository sources you have added or in another component. For Debian, use madison, other distros have equivalents. For that package for example you need: ...


0

In the end I found out what the problem was and got it to update actual packages. For that to work I had to repeat the whole process twice though. create signature file on offline computer download package for this signature file on online computer install package on offline computer - this time only the apt database was updated, no packages were updated ...


4

Perl in Debian is split into several parts. One of these parts, the perl-base package, is part of the set of "essential" packages. Debian defines these essential packages as "will always be installed on a debian system". Packages can assume they will be available, even if they do not have any form of dependency declared on them. If you remove one of them, ...


1

These are most likely outdated versions or programs you didn't explicitly install. Since it blocks you from removing vlc as you requested, nothing would stop you from installing those you need after. It is usually very safe to say yes there.


1

As Krzysztof points out, you'll need a separate cron entry for this. It's probably best to call unattended-upgrade directly (it's a python script), to ensure package blacklists/whitelists, reboots and other details are handled appropriately. For example: echo "0 0-23/4 * * * root sleep $(( $RANDOM % 14400 ));PATH=/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/sbin:/bin:/...


4

You can use the --reinstall flag to apt-get apt-get --reinstall install procps


0

Looks like the problem was due to having a local version of python installed I was able to run the apt-get -f after removing the local python install and 'manually' installing python-minimal with dpkg. Thank you all for your input.


0

The last line of your sources.list points to Jessie. Wheezy was the previous stable release of Debian, Jessie is the current. And Wheezy now only gets very few updates. When you just run apt-get install <package>, it will try to install the newest version it can find (unless you have some pinning set up, but if you have you should know about it, and ...


0

This is because the service can't be started. You can interrupt the apt command by doing systemctl restart docker and then just following this solution: http://stackoverflow.com/a/37640824/287130


0

Thank you to Stephen Harris for providing me this solution. He posted the link to this blog http://blog.andrewbeacock.com/2007/03/how-to-install-specific-version-of.html which had a very simple solution to my problem. First I ran the following command apt-cache showpkg <package name> In this case apt-cache showpkg nginx Then I searched the ...


1

Just exit the shell, type exit or press CTRL-D.


-1

The needrestart package will implement what you are describing once installed.


0

The prompt is because the services that those libraries depend of have special checks to make them restart as earlier as possible, for example glibc has a handful of critical services that must be restarted as earlier as possible. If those systems aren't running these services or they don't have a interactive session opened when those libraries upgrade they ...


0

Modifying where dpkg logs its output is possible through the --log option. This only allows filenames. DPKG was built as a simple and efficient tool to manipulate packages, so not having logger that complicates stuff is a plus. The simplest way would be that you write to a file and syslog reads from that file as you already know. You can use status-fd to ...


2

The only way to do this is to run clean after installing the said packages. This is necessary due the way that apt and dpkg interact. Apt calls dpkg with the path of all the the packages and allows dpkg to do it's job, but for such thing to happen the deb packages should be in the disk, ie. cannot be on the fly. Adding a DPkg::Post-Invoke option issuing the ...


1

I don't know if your problem still exists, but in case it does I've found a solution which worked for me (Xenial 16.04): Link to ubuntuforums.org The user proposes to use aptitude instead of apt-get for installing gimp. sudo apt-get install aptitude sudo aptitude update sudo aptitude install gimp When I installed it that way I was asked for some error ...


0

No, you cannot update your repos' database fetching the new ones' content from the Internet, without having an Internet Connection. You could update it only from a local device (i.e. cd-rom). It's not a matter of apt-get that you can workaround with aptitude. You just need an Internet connection. If you don't have one nor can in any way solve this issue (for ...


0

The --noconfirm flag will not assume "yes" on every answer. It assumes the default answer which can be "no". To assume "yes", you could pipe the output of the yes command to pacman. yes | sudo pacman -S firefox


1

The "wrong architecture 'amd64'" error is because you tried to install a 64-bit ("amd64") package on a 32-bit ("i386") system. The libc6-dev-i386 package is sort of a strange one because it's built only for 64-bit systems, but it actually contains 32-bit software. It's meant to help with compiling 32-bit programs on 64-bit systems. Since you're running a ...


2

I found this answer to a duplicate question on ServerFault titled: yum equivalent of “apt-get purge" that provides the only method I've seen that can do what apt-get purge <pkg> does on Ubuntu/Debian. for package in package1 package2 package3 do echo "removing config files for $package" for file in $(rpm -q --configfiles $package) do echo " ...


1

As the others have mentioned, debootstrap or cdebootstrap is the way to go. What this does, in case you want to replicate it, is download all packages marked Essential: yes in the packages list, and their direct and indirect dependencies, then extract the files contained within into the target file system. This can be done with ar, tar and xz. This is ...


2

You can build apt-get from source. The source of a Debian package is always available from the package page (except for some packages in the non-free component). However this won't help you. To install Debian or Ubuntu on a system where you have a running Linux kernel, use debootstrap. Debootstrap downloads and installs a basic system. For installation on a ...


1

The cuda opencl should be OK, I think. Configuring ImageMagick, please try ... ./configure CFLAGS=-I/usr/local/cuda-7.5/include/CL


7

apt's source code is available on Alioth, but it isn't designed to serve as a basis for bootstrapping a distribution from source. To bootstrap a Debian-based (apt-based) distribution, you need to use a tool such as debootstrap, which itself needs quite a number of programs to run (although since your filesystem isn't empty, but includes the basic Linux tools,...


3

The easiest is probably just to install them as Stephen suggests in the other answer, but you can also just mark them as manually installed with aptitude unmarkauto <packages>....


1

You should be able to do sudo apt-get install .... and the packages you want to keep. This will tell the system the packages were "manually" installed and so remove them from the autoremove scope eg we can see my system wants to auto-remove a number of packages: # apt-get upgrade Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state ...



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