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1

As Alex pointed out: sudo apt-get clean sudo apt-get install --reinstall $(dpkg --get-selections | grep -w 'install$' | cut -f 1) The first one makes sure apt's cache is empty. That way apt-get will need to download the packages from the repositories. The second, first you need a list of all installed packages, which is what the $(...) part is doing, and ...


3

The term backporting means (by definition) rebuilding existing packaging on an earlier version of the system. Why is that "backporting process does not consider upstream releases"? Packaging a previously unpackaged software release is not backporting. What is the advantage of downstream release over upstream ones for backporting? I'm not ...


2

apt-get source is extremely useful if you want to customize a package. Distributions already make several customizations (small if the package is already well-behaved) to every package in order to make it fit. If you encounter a bug or want to add a feature to some program you're using, you shouldn't have to give up all bugfixes, features, and system ...


0

This is an alternative method to the accepted answer but thought I'd share it here anyways. this blog post describes the method, titled: The following signatures couldn’t be verified. With this error message when attempting to do an aptget update: W: GPG error: http://packages.dotdeb.org wheezy Release: The following signatures couldn’t be verified ...


3

No, is not. There two places where you can add repositories. The /etc/apt/sources.list and any file ending in .list in the /etc/apt/sources.list.d/ directory (if you add an entry in the apt.conf file you can add more, but the ones before are the default). So, just check the files in the directory and remove the one you don't need. On the other hand, ...


2

I think you can do this: Package: yourpackage Pin: version 7.* Pin-Priority: 999 This would allow upgrades to yourpackage to versions matching 7.*


2

The structure of the sources.list doesn't benefit of "minimization". There's no actual gain on compressing the lines further. All repositories listed should have the following: type [ options ] uri suite [component1] [component2] [...] or the rfc822 format Types: deb deb-src URIs: http://example.com Suites: stable testing Sections: component1 component2 ...


0

Running the script through dos2unix before executing it caused it to work properly. I'm guessing that apt-get was reading the extra \r at the end of the line as part of the package name, and thus looking for ldap-auth-client\r (which doesn't exist) instead of ldap-auth-client (which does).


1

Uninstall zfs-fuse and install ZFS on Linux: http://zfsonlinux.org, and for Debian specifically: http://zfsonlinux.org/debian.html The instructions from the links above are pretty straight forward, however, a couple of caveats I ran into that aren't mentioned: /etc/hostid file wasn't there which resulted in a failed initramfs image build, the fix is easy: ...


0

php5-sqlrelay is only available in unstable for m68k in the debports repos: https://packages.debian.org/search?keywords=php5-sqlrelay If you have a suitable processor (m68k), then read this for details on how to install a package from testing: How to pull dependencies for package/testing from testing


3

How about splitting your package into two: one part that contains the real functionality, and another part that conflicts with the packages you want to remove. Make the first package recommend the second package so that it gets installed by default, but if you later want to install something that your package conflicts with, then you can choose to remove ...


2

If you rule out adding the key and using that, you can still verify the MD5 manually. Print the md5sum of the Packages file which is listed in the Release file. sed -n "s,main/binary-i386/Packages$,,p" ftp.us.debian.org_debian_dists_sid_Release # Print the md5sum of the Packages file itself. md5sum ...


1

The directory wheezy-backports contains packages from Debian testing, recompiled for Debian wheezy. These packages are called backports. They are not part of the default distribution, they are provided as optional extras for users who want newer version of some software. If you have a wheezy system, add backports to your list of packages sources: deb ...


0

Files located in /var are very much system-critical. For example, /var/mail or /var/spool/mail contains the users' email; you would no more delete that than you would light a fire in your neighbor's mailbox. It's only files in certain subdirectories of /var that contain files that are more or less transitory: log files in /var/log, caches that can usually be ...


1

I suggested (in comments) Can you download the bluefish-data binary deb package via apt-get download or aptitude download or just from a Debian web page and try installing it with dpkg -i? The poster replied: dpkg -i bluefish gave me this error dpkg: error: reading package info file '/var/lib/dpkg/available': Input/output error ...


4

Some software projects provide pre-compiled binaries for several distributions. For Debian, look for a .deb package. If you find one, just run: dpkg -i your-package-name.deb Look also: http://backports.debian.org/Instructions


0

Well I suppose you could recreate the file empty and then do apt-get install long-list, assuming you know what you installed the first time. I have an ancient script that does basically this from the smallest set of packages that can run apt-get. When using it I ended up reporting dozens of non-declared dependencies. If you don't know everything you ...


6

If you look at the purpose of /var as given in the Filesystem Hierarchy Standard, it says: /var contains variable data files. This includes spool directories and files, administrative and logging data, and transient and temporary files. Note that "transient and temporary" files are just one of the things it contains. It also contains "spool directories ...


3

You can't "recreate" /var/lib/dpkg/status in the sense of just running a command and the file magically appears. No. You need to use a backup of the file, and learn never going around deleting things of the /var/lib directory: sudo cp /var/lib/dpkg/status-old /var/lib/dpkg/status This would give you the package status of the day before. Start praying it ...


0

As a temporary an limited solution to use Firefox without proper installation: --following this answer -- Downloaded the Firefox package Unpacked it. Now Firefox can be launched from there. Creating a Firefox.desktop file in /usr/share/applications would add that to the menu entries.


2

The ppa does not "know" about Semplice. If it's similar enough to Debian sid, try adding the ppa manually in /etc/apt/sources.list: deb http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-mozilla-daily/ppa/ubuntu unstable main deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-mozilla-daily/ppa/ubuntu unstable main


3

You can use apt-mark for that. From it's manpage: auto auto is used to mark a package as being automatically installed, which will cause the package to be removed when no more manually installed packages depend on this package. manual manual is used to mark a package as being manually installed, which will prevent the ...


3

There are those two condiguration item you need in apt: Dir::Cache "/home/user/apt/cache"; Dir::State::Lists "/home/user/apt/lists"; Write them into /etc/apt/apt.conf.d/99custom. Now you have to mkae that folder structure or apt will fail: mkdir -p /home/user/apt/cache mkdir -p /home/user/apt/lists/partial Now, run apt-get update to create the needed ...


4

You have a few options. Change the settings in /etc/apt/apt.conf dir::state::lists /path/to/new/directory; dir::cache::archives /path/to/new/directory; Mount a larger partitions at the current directories (if you have spare space for a partition): # mount /dev/sda5 /var/lib/apt # mount /dev/sda6 /var/cache/apt Of course, for the above to work, ...


0

The following packages are in a mess due to serious problems during installation. They must be reinstalled for them (and any packages that depend on them) to function properly: python-lxml pythonic binding for the libxml2 and libxslt libraries python-aptdaemon Python 2 module for the server and client of aptdaemon ...


0

As of Oct 08th 2014, I had the same issue, trying to update debian behind a proxy on local network. In the hope it will be relevant to others, I post my response here. As others have mentioned, editing /etc/hosts is something one should be careful with. But personally I just wanted to have the update done. Content of /etc/apt/sources.list when doing the ...


1

First of all, the lines you are truly interested in are: dpkg: warning: 'ldconfig' not found in PATH or not executable. dpkg: warning: 'start-stop-daemon' not found in PATH or not executable. These errors have been reported several times by Debian and Ubuntu users (you can actually Google them for more information). It seems like the PATH variable isn't ...


6

When you use apt to install a package, internally it uses the dpkg . When you install a package using apt it first create list of all the dependencies and download it from the repository. Once download is finished it use calls dpkg to install all those files satisfying all the dependencies. So if you have a .deb file: You can install it using dpkg -i ...


2

Install your foo.deb file with dpkg -i foo.deb. If there are some errors with unresolved dependencies, run apt-get install -f afterwards.


1

Check the dependencies with dpkg -I my.deb and apt-get install the dependencies before dpkg -i my.deb. May be you can copy the my.deb in /var/cache/apt/archives and install it directly with apt-get but I never tried. Doesn't work, apt-get and dpkg are looking for packages listed in archives.


0

The corrected command to create the package: checkinstall -D --fstrans=no \ --maintainer=tim@example.com --backup=yes \ --pkgname=python3.4.0 --pkgversion=3.4.0 make altinstall altinstall will stop the creation of 2to3, python, etc and just install the version specific names (2to3-3.4, python3.4 in this case). The generic names are just symbolic links.


1

As others have already noted, make sure that for every deb … entry in /etc/apt/sources.list and /etc/apt/sources.list.d/*, you have a matching deb-src … entry. The rest of the line must be identical. The deb entry is for binary packages (i.e. ready to install), the deb-src is for source packages (i.e. ready to compile). The reason why the two kinds of ...


1

Thanks to @steeldriver, I figured out what to do. Just had to add the following ling to my /etc/apt/sources.list: deb-src ftp://ftp.de.debian.org/debian/ stable main contrib deb-src repositories contain sources packages (as opposed to binary, ready-to-install packages) needed for compiling.


0

You should not worry about overwriting the file, the bin/2to3 file is a 5 line script that only differs in the first line (the binary python version it invokes): $ diff -u bin/2to3 ../2.7.8 --- bin/2to3 2014-06-24 16:39:43.000000000 +0200 +++ ../2.7.8/bin/2to3 2014-07-21 18:45:32.000000000 +0200 @@ -1,4 +1,4 @@ -#! /opt/python/3.4.1/bin/python3.4 +#! ...


2

I got my system updated by downloading 4.3 bash source code and patches from ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bash and compiling it to replace the existing code. It works, now waiting for more patches.


1

Courtesy @hbdgaf, this how-to put me on the right track: export DEBIAN_FRONTEND=noninteractive echo mysql-apt-config mysql-apt-config/enable-repo select mysql-5.7-dmr | sudo debconf-set-selections wget http://dev.mysql.com/get/mysql-apt-config_0.2.1-1ubuntu12.04_all.deb sudo dpkg --install mysql-apt-config_0.2.1-1ubuntu12.04_all.deb I put together this ...


0

Since you cant add the repository, you can always add them from a terminal using the command line. Browse to the list of the repositories at the WebUpd8 Website. Copy down the address of the master repository, which is Master Repository. You want to add this one because it contains all the others. sudo cp /etc/apt/sources.list ...


1

Currently the best option is to use official MySQL APT repo which allows apt-get upgrade installation.


-1

I figured out how to work around my issue by doing the installation like so: $ sudo dpkg -i --force-overwrite packagename It would appear that I was getting collisions from a different nginx package that had files in common with this new package. I opted for the heavy handed method and simply did the above, --force-overwrite. DO NOT USE :) Its useless it ...


0

You can try to reattach the session with a tool like reptyr, but that doesn't always work. You can kill apt, dpkg and their subprocesses at any time. All package maintenance tasks are supposed to resist a sudden power failure. Run the command again to complete it. Make sure to send a SIGINT or SIGTERM signal to APT and dpkg, not a SIGKILL. A SIGKILL would ...


3

The -u switch shows a list of packages that are available for upgrade: # apt-get -u upgrade From the apt-get manpage: -u --show-upgraded Show upgraded packages; Print out a list of all packages that are to be upgraded. Configuration Item: APT::Get::Show-Upgraded. You will also be prompted before anything is updated. For example: # apt-get -u ...


0

The question, if I understand it correctly, is: Given just a debian/ directory, i.e. a directory containing just the Debian packaging files for a software package, is there a way to use those packaging files to download and unpack the sources for that software package? The target get-orig-source in debian/rules can be defined, as described in Debian ...



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