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1

Have you tried using strace to diagnose the problem? I have a similar problem which seems to be related to the google-earth package -- something in the meta-data for the package causes apt-get (or some component of the apt system) to segfault. I discovered this by using: sudo strace -f apt-get update >log.strace-aptget 2>&1 Looking at the log ...


1

This is a known bug. See Debian bug report 782505. Briefly, this is a security fix gone wrong. Less briefly, the package libxrender1 for the archs i386 and amd64 have different contents for the shared changelog file /usr/share/doc/libxrender1/changelog.Debian.gz. This is of course not allowed by dpkg. ...


-1

If you just want to update to latest version using terminal paste following code into it and hit enter git clone https://github.com/git/git


2

debhelper can be built without NLS, which doesn't require po4a; see https://bugs.debian.org/709557 for details. Once you have the source for debhelper, you can run USE_NLS=no dpkg-buildpackage -d -b -uc to get an installable .deb, which you can then use to build po4a and then rebuild debhelper with NLS. Note that debhelper is an Architecture: all ...


0

You may try to install your package with the following steps (if you're installing the separate .deb package, not from repositories via APT tools): Install the package itself via: dpkg -i /path/to/package.deb. It seems that you've performed that action yet. If you'll have some unmet dependencies like in your message you have, run the following: aptitude ...


1

gnome-core is a meta-package and gnome-terminal is part of this package. It is no problem to remove the gnome-core-package. And in your special case, reinstall automatically installed packages: sudo apt-get install --reinstall baobab caribou caribou-antler empathy empathy-common fonts-cantarell gcalctool gdm3 gnome-backgrounds gnome-dictionary ...


0

The best way to remove such unmet dependencies that you do not want to satisfy is to use: apt-get purge Purge ensures that any configuration files in relation to the package are deleted as well. In short, purge would remove anything in relation to the package--and you would be rid of the unmet dependency problem.


0

Running the following commands: gksu nautilus sudo rm /etc/apt/sources.list.d/getdeb.list.bck you can remove that file. Here you can find some more explanation about the solution procedure.


1

To re-create the source directory, delete it and run dpkg-source -x foo...dsc This will extract everything using the .dsc and the two tarballs (or the tarball and patch as in your example).


0

In the meanwhile I solved my problem by means of the following steps I checked the synaptic package managing tool for the installed and available versions regarding the mentioned packages I then downloaded the versions tagged with (trusty) or whenever a (trusty-updates)-version was mentioned the trusty-updates version. The command was sudo apt-get download ...


1

I couldn't find the way to remove Replese.gpg as mark said. Nevertheless, I also get similar errors during apt-get install as apt-get still tried to connect to isoc.org.il. To reslove the issue, I generated the first 4 lines with a fixed mirror (US mirror) using debgen.simplylinux.ch. Here is the final working sources.list: deb ...


0

The line is to be installed means that Firefox 36 is the only version available in the repositories. The package depends on Firefox 35, which isn't available, so apt can't install the package. There's some information in this question about installing a package while ignoring some dependencies: ...


1

lxdm is in Debian unstable, but not in Wheezy. You might be able to backport it, though. apt-cache policy lxdm lxdm: Installed: (none) Candidate: 0.5.0-3 Version table: 0.5.0-3 0 50 http://httpredir.debian.org/debian/ unstable/main amd64 Packages The build depends of lxdm are given as: apt-cache showsrc lxdm ... Build-Depends: ...


1

Please do not use symbolic links to /dev/null. Edit the main apt config file (/etc/apt/apt.conf) as explained by Gilles if you really do not wish to have any package history. Note that /etc/apt/apt.conf may not yet exist on your system. In this case, the apt package executables use built-in defaults. So, you would have to create the file from scratch as ...


1

I know of no program to obtain this information. 1st idea Remove Kali repository. Install Synaptic Package Manager sudo apt-get install synaptic Run synaptic Klick Reload Open Installed (local or obsolete) Use Package > Force version Sometimes synaptic thinks it does not get further. Simply restart synaptic. Sometimes it is easier if other packages are ...


2

From what I've gathered from Mint's repositories, Mint 17 (Qiana) is based on Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr), and instead of hosting everything themselves, Mint rely on the Ubuntu repositories to provide all the packages that haven't been modified by Mint. This includes base-files, which contains /etc/issue etc.; it seems that Mint installs the Ubuntu version of ...


1

I got these messages several times the last 6-7 months and always selected "No" on them, without any problems. The /etc/issue file is only used in the login message and/or message of the day, if at all, and not for deriving any other settings on the system.


1

Found it, was actually the /etc/default/locale It must have slipped me when editing it and I actually left no space between locale and the comment after it (#Comment here), hence it was getting the # from the comment... How silly... If anyone ever gets anything like this, just look in your /etc/default/locale


0

Full credit to @wurtel for giving me the answer in the comments. The solution is to run dpkg-reconfigure mysql-apt-config which brings up a menu. Select utilities, then ok as shown below. Then select mysql-utilities-x, then ok. Then on the next menu. Select Apply. Then run sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade and everything ...


0

I had same problem, I tried all the above solution along with checking over Ubuntu software center.I couldn't crack to solve it.I have tried another way which worked for me. Here is my solution Firstly we need to be connected to the internet for update process to happen. $sudo apt-get remove openssh-client $sudo apt-get update If the update cant happen ...


3

apt-file search all repos listed in /etc/apt/sources.list and related databases, as long as repo serve a contents-%architecture%.gz. if believe the file of interest is an executable name "top", use this regex. '^/(usr/)?s?bin/top$' for the official debian repo, there is a web interface https://packages.debian.org/file:top, there are other search options.


6

The direct answer is procps. Here is how you can find this out for yourself: # Install apt-file, which allows you to search # for the package containing a file sudo apt-get install apt-file # Update the package/file mapping database sudo apt-file update # Search for "top" at the end of a path apt-file search --regexp '/top$' The output of the final ...


2

You can search for things with apt-cache search ..., although it is just a match on package names and descriptions, which sometimes is not enough. In that case using, e.g., apt-file search top might work -- it finds all packages that have a file with top in their name, but for this that is a bit zany (it includes setopt, .desktop, etc). To refine this ...


2

You can use aptitude why <packagename> to determine why a package that was automatically installed. Here is an example of pulseaudio on my system: $ aptitude why pulseaudio i pulseaudio Recommends pulseaudio-module-x11 i A pulseaudio-module-x11 Depends pulseaudio (= 4.0-6~bpo7+1)


0

I would simply remove it — apt-get remove nginx — counting on the fact that APT will complain if some other package depends on it. If there is such a dependency, you have your probable culprit. Then you can decide if you really do want to keep it. If nothing else depended on it, I'd go looking in its web root (probably /var/log/www) to see if it was serving ...


1

Try running the commands: grep nginx /var/log/apt/history.log nginx grep nginx /var/log/apt/history.log.1.gz etc (for whatever history.log files are present). The apt history shows what packages were installed by apt, so will show your package as long as it wasn't too long ago. To do these all at one shot, use (thanks to Stephen Kitt): zgrep nginx ...



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