New answers tagged

0

Try this instead since it will take your output and make it one giant line with spaces separating the filenames. dpkg --get-selections | grep -v deinstall | awk '{print $1}' > list.log awk '$1=$1' ORS=' ' list.log > newlist.log apt-get install --reinstall $(cat newlist.log) The only change to your original post is adding in the second awk statement, ...


0

sudo apt-get install libglm-dev worked for me.


2

You need to add the hyphen in wheezy-backports: deb http://cdn.debian.net/debian wheezy­-backports main See the backports website for the complete instructions.


1

Various distros name their packages slightly differently and there is no automated way to map one to the other. You've probably quoted the best example already with Apache, which is apache2 on Debian/Ubuntu systems and httpd on CentOS/RedHat/Fedora systems, apache on Arch, apache2 on openSuse, www-servers/apache on Gentoo etc. The best way to find the ...


0

Noting this because you mention that other distribution answers are welcome. rpm has a large set of output format tags, one of which is INSTALLTIME. (Using wget as an example) rpm -qi wget --qf "%{NAME},%{INSTALLTIME}\n" | tail -n 1 wget,1454014156 This can be formatted in a few ways. I use it in this way: rpm -qi wget --qf ...


0

I found the solution: Firstly, I ran echo -e "deb http://http.kali.org/kali sana main non-free contrib\ndeb http://security.kali.org/kali-security/ sana/updates main contrib non-free" > /etc/apt/sources.list, and then apt-get update, apt-get update --fix-missing. After this Tor was installed normally with apt-get install tor


2

The “Yes do as I say” prompt is shown when you try to remove a package that's marked “essential”. Its meaning is what it says on the tin — what you're trying to do could make your system unusable, and you should not continue unless you know exactly what you're doing. It's one of those cases where if you need to ask, don't do it. I'm not sure what would go ...


4

There are a few routines, old wives' tales, for finding and then cleaning out unnecessary packages, in additon to the already suggested debfoster. (first) but, why is that package installed? A tool you will want to use while cleaning out packages is aptitude why pkg-name From the aptitude man page: $ aptitude why kdepim i nautilus-data Recommends ...


3

To get a list of all the files installed by a package, you can use dpkg -L <package_name> In your case dpkg -L nginx-light will list all the files installed by the package. Look at that list to know where the executable has been installed. Also, if you know the executable's name beforehand, you can filter the list of files with grep: dpkg -L ...


1

You have to have a repository with proper structure and it should be built and signed with proper tools. Here are some tutorials that might help you in this, Ubuntu Repo Questions


2

dpkg/apt and rpm/yum use databases that get locked when a package is being installed. This is done on purpose; it is to avoid possible corruption of the databases. The databases are meant for tracking the installed packages on a system.


0

This question was solved in a comment on this page by dadexix86. http://askubuntu.com/questions/727871/how-to-install-latest-version-of-tiled-editor-on-ubuntu?noredirect=1#comment1078796_727871 Quote: Tried right now on Wily and it works version 0.15.1 . The package name in the ppa is tiled-daily, while tiled is the one in the standard Ubuntu repo ...


2

According to the Debian Wiki page on Repository Format: These fields are optional. They may be displayed to the user by package management tool or used for pinning. It is suggested that any repository published for other users to use fills meaningful information in these fields so that the user can tell apart different repositories. ...


1

From the Debian Policy Manual: Depending on context and the control file used, the Architecture field can include the following sets of values: A unique single word identifying a Debian machine architecture as described in Architecture specification strings, Section 11.1. An architecture wildcard identifying a set of Debian machine ...


2

The package lists apt-get is using are out of date; you need to run apt-get update before installing your packages. The connection errors to ftp.fr.debian.org are strange, that site is accessible for me...


0

On Linux Mint 17 I encountered a similar sounding issue. I was zeleous in delteing files and found myself where the "Administration -> Upgrade Manager" just didn't look happy....... The solution that worked for me was to create a directory called "dpkg" as per the error message, and in it create an empty file called "status". I then ran Update Manager. ...


0

As Orient says in a comment, you first need to add the repository. But which repository? The answer turns out to be hidden in plain sight on the page you linked. Since 3.8 is the current version, it turns out you need to add the repository without a version number. I don't know what distribution your version of Linux Mint translates to, but for Ubuntu ...


0

Apt complains about held broken packages, so start with $ dpkg --get-selections | grep hold$ and remove the held status from each PACKAGE in the resulting list with $ echo PACKAGE install | sudo dpkg --set-selections Then try $ sudo apt-get install -f If there are too many broken packages $ sudo apt-get install -f --ignore-hold may be quicker, ...


0

sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade sudo apt-get install synaptic re-install vlc from synaptic try to fix broken packages


1

You don't tell how you tried pinning and how it failed, but the solution is pinning indeed. If you've already removed all sources you aren't interested in, create /etc/apt/preferences.d/back.pref with the following contents: Package: * Pin: release o=* Pin-Priority: 1001 After this, apt-get dist-upgrade will up/downgrade all packages to your current ...


0

A similar thing already happened to me. It seems evident libatomic.so is corrupted. You can try to download libatomic1*.dpkg from packages.debian.org using another computer and then install it with: sudo dpkg -i libatomic1*deb If it fixes your problem, all fine. In my case, I ended up finding a string of corrupted files as soon I fixed all of them, and ...


0

get sonic-pi manually and retry .... wget http://sonic-pi.net/files/releases/v2.9.0/Sonic-Pi-for-RPi-Jessie-v2.9.0.tgz tar -xvzf Sonic-Pi-for-RPi-Jessie-v2.9.0.tgz


0

Try the following command: sudo apt-get install --fix-broken From the apt-get man page: -f, --fix-broken Fix; attempt to correct a system with broken dependencies in place. This option, when used with install/remove, can omit any packages to permit APT to deduce a likely solution. If packages are specified, these have to completely ...


2

I'll assume that the other users aren't trying to hide anything from you, they're just a bit clueless or annoying. If they want to hide, they can, and there's nothing you can do about it. There are logs of apt usage in /var/log/apt and logs of dpkg usage in /var/log/dpkg.log. They tell you what packages operations were made when; they don't tell you by whom ...


0

A more efficient version of @Patrice's solution, using a shell with support for process substitution (bash, AT&T ksh, zsh): ( export LC_ALL=C comm -23 <(find / -xdev -type f | sort) \ <(sort -u /var/lib/dpkg/info/*.list) ) Like Patrice's solution, it assumes no file path contains newline characters.


0

If you shut down your computer, it starts again with no program running. Depending on your desktop environment, some of the programs you were using may be started automatically when you log in again, and if the programs remember their open files then they'll have the same files open, but that's about it. Many GUI applications are big things that do a lot, ...


0

What's going to happen if I shutdown my PC after suspending a terminal process? The same thing that happens if you terminate it with kill.  I would say, "The same thing that happens if you terminate it with Ctrl+C," but programs can trap that and clean up after themselves before they exit.  (Strictly speaking, programs can trap Ctrl+Z too, but not ...


0

fg the process won't work after a reboot because during the shutdown face a signal is sent to the process to kill it. Why not do something like: sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo reboot Once the upgrade finishes successfully, the reboot command will be issued.


1

Type (as root user): apt-get install <package> OR as a non-root user with sudo access... Type: sudo apt-get install <package>


0

I have had the same problem for years, for fresh installs, a lot of libraries are not set to auto although I see no reason for them not to. I have been setting auto on all libraries manually, but once or twice I ran into problems because something important was uninstalled thereafter (once it was a pam module I think :( ). So I'm not sure if it is a good ...


2

By default, apt installs the version of the package with the largest version number. You can use APT preferences (wiki) to override this. APT preferences let you configure priorities for package versions based on the package name, the version number, and the source from which the package is installed. By default, a package source has a priority of 500. If ...


0

SO I followed this guide here: https://blog.bartbania.com/raspberry_pi/files-list-file-missing-final-newline/ And managed to fix my problem.


2

Well it could have been that the mirror had problems, it happens some times like this reddit discussion between users who had buggy mirrors and you should report when it happens to mirrors@debian.org and they will get to you right away. You could change the mirrors in your /etc/apt/sources.list to mirrors nearer to where you live from this site ...


0

What you're asking about is configurable in /etc/apt/preferences, as mentioned here: Repository priority settings, calls it "apt pinning", and recommends reading apt_preferences manual page, as well as pointing to Apt-Pinning for Beginners


1

In Debian, this is usually a manual process, ultimately accomplished with apt-get upgrade (to upgrade to the current stable release, Debian 8 Jessie). There are other considerations which apt-get doesn't handle for you and these factors are listed in the Release Notes. Find your target release on the Debian Releases Page. On the release page you'll find a ...


0

Officially, there's no tool - you're supposed to take care about it on your own: see https://www.debian.org/releases/stable/i386/release-notes/ch-upgrading.html, for example. Basically, it revolves around changing/adding URLs to repository for newer version and upgrading packages, sorting out any trouble that might come. You can see in the guide that it's ...


4

What you're seeing is a backported Kernel. It is as linux-generic-lts-vivid - which is the Linux kernel from Vivid built for Trusty. It's installed on your system, so you have a newer kernel than the original one that showed in Trusty; so either you installed a newer Hardware Enablement Stack, or you installed from a later Trusty ISO (the Trusty 14.04.3 ...


1

If you did not noticed already, android is a Linux kernel with completely different userland, so if you want to (re)use regular Linux binaries on it, you're probably out of luck. Android has a different filesystem layout and has no regular Unix standard files. It even lacks /tmp directory. You can try to setup a chroot on it. It may become complicated, ...


2

There are three different hooks called Post-Invoke or Post-Invoke-Success, all managed by the apt tools: DPkg::Post-Invoke, which is invoked after every execution of dpkg (by an apt tool, not manually); APT::Update::Post-Invoke-Success, which is invoked after successful updates (i.e. package information updates, not upgrades); APT::Update::Post-Invoke, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included