Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

The idea is that you always have a relatively fresh main file (such as access_log or error_log) which contains the latest entries. As the log becomes either too old or too large, logrotate creates archived files so that no information is discarded (something like access_log-YYYYMMDD). Therefore, older logs can still be accessed without the main log file ...


2

To recover /usr/share/apache2/default-site/index.html you need to re-install apache2-data. Given your current situation, try sudo apt-get purge apache2-data sudo apt-get install apache2 Presumably your system ended up in that state because apt-get autoremove didn't uninstall apache2-data, but your rm -rf removed the files it contained. Then apt-get ...


2

If you can not find the log file or the log file is empty you can run the apache configuration test that will print out any problems with configuration files: apachectl configtest (Sorry for "stealing" this question - I realize that it was answered about a year ago, but I was just solving the same issue and this was one of the first results and none of ...


1

The standard Debian way of doing this is to provide a complete virtual host configuration as a new file in /etc/apache2/sites-available, then enable it using a2ensite (and perhaps disable the default using a2dissite). So you'd create say /etc/apache2/sites-available/bticino.conf containing <VirtualHost *:80> DocumentRoot /home/pi/bticino ...


1

here's a RewriteRule that implements the redirect ([R]) RewriteRule ^/foo/([0-9]*)$ /bar?q=$1 [R] if you are using .htaccess to add your rewrite rules, you might want to make this local to the /foo directory, so put the following into foo/.htaccess: RewriteRule ^([0-9]*)$ /bar&q=$1 [R]


1

In a .htaccess file, you should not have a leading slash: "the per-directory prefix (which always is the same for a specific directory) is automatically removed for the RewriteRule pattern matching and automatically added after any relative (not starting with a slash or protocol name) substitution". I don't know in which directory your .htaccess lives, but ...


1

From your grep results showing no other conflicting Aliases, the most likely explanation is that somehow you've got the file included twice. Look for any additional Include or IncludeOptional directives. (Especially this might occur on a 2.2→2.4 upgrade, as IncludeOptional is new.) The other troubleshooting tip to deal with similar problems is that mod_info ...


1

Never mind. I figured it out. Got it to work by moving the css file to public_html (not really necessary), changing the htaccess code to RewriteEngine on RewriteCond %{QUERY_STRING} action=mymail_form_css RewriteRule ^(.*)$ /mymail_form.css? [L,R=301] and moving the code to the document root's .htaccess Carry on~



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible