Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

I'm going to use Firefox as an example, because its open source and easy to find the information for, but this applies (probably with slightly different lists of ports) to other browsers, too. In August 2001, CERT issued a vulnerability note about how a web browser could be used to send near-arbitrary data to TCP ports chosen by an attacker, on any ...


20

Definitely it serves a security purpose. For example, look at the below bug filed for a system user who had a shell. My debian server was compromised due to the daemon account having a valid login shell and having samba open for internet access. The break in was made by setting a password remotly via samba for the daemon account and the logging ...


16

If you take a look at the nologin man page you'll see the following description. excerpt nologin displays a message that an account is not available and exits non-zero. It is intended as a replacement shell field to deny login access to an account. If the file /etc/nologin.txt exists, nologin displays its contents to the user instead of ...


6

To add to the excellent answers of @slm and @ramesh: Yes, as you have pointed out, you can still switch to users with nologin as their default shell by running sudo with a shell defined, but in this case, you have had to: Log in as another user that has a valid shell Have sudo permissions configured for that user to run the su command, and Had your su ...


6

apache restarts just fine but on the web it does not work. Port 80 is the default HTTP port for browsers as well as servers. This means in order to access a server that's operating on a non-standard port from a browser, you need to include the port in the address, e.g.: http://localhost:79/rest/of/url Without the :79 after the hostname, the browser ...


3

Assuming 1.2.3.4 is your web server's IP, you may use: http://1.2.3.4/hello.html .. to access your web page, provided your Apache server is configured correctly. If your machine has a domain name attached to it, you may use it as well since it resolves to 1.2.3.4. If this machine is hidden behind a router (which is usually the case on a home network), ...


2

BIND is one of the best DNS server in the world, you can use Bind to achieve your goal. For configuration purpose here some useful sites: Server World: (For Ubuntu) DNS Web Linux Home Networking: DNS Web To use BIND with web server here is a useful Link.


2

You must set ServerName directive: ServerName localhost In Debian, you can set it in /etc/apache2/conf.d/httpd.conf.


2

I am writing my comment as an answer since it seems to be relevant to your case. Keyword: logs. You can find logs for Apache2 at: /var/log/apache2. They may be in different locations according to your distribution, but this one is the most common. Have a look at error and access logs to identify your requests. You can use grep to search your logs for 404 ...


2

Use the DirectoryIndex directive: The DirectoryIndex directive sets the list of resources to look for, when the client requests an index of the directory by specifying a / at the end of the directory name. Local-url is the (%-encoded) URL of a document on the server relative to the requested directory; it is usually the name of a file in the directory. ...


1

There is something pesky on your DNS answer. The correct one should be: ;; ANSWER SECTION: thepiratebay.se. 84496 IN A 194.71.107.27 It seems that someone is "shadowing" that to you.


1

a. Is my understanding of the three files correct ? If somebody could better explain it would be nice. In general, it's correct. But you can read more details, if you open /etc/apache2/apache2.conf: # * apache2.conf is the main configuration file (this file). It puts the pieces # together by including all remaining configuration files when starting ...


1

You can run any service on any port (modulo privileges). That HTTP is on port 80 is pure convention, there's no technical reason to do this. So yes, you could run HTTP on port 1 (unless it is being used by another program). If it didn't work for you, then either you still need to fix the server configuration (check what netstat -ntl says), or, as goldilocks ...


1

From the Apache docs for Option: Note Mixing Options with a + or - with those without is not valid syntax, and will be rejected during server startup by the syntax check with an abort. So it seems that it all or nothing with the +.


1

You are running the php script as 'root' user, which is why the .ini file is getting created with root ownership. Even if the file is getting created with 'root' as its owner, the other 'php code files' should be able to read it since it will, in all probability, have read permission for 'others'. So here, you need to check the permissions of the directory ...


1

Set up your user ftp_user so that they can FTP successfully into their home directory. Assuming you're using vsftp as your FTP server; you'll need the following as a minimum in your /etc/vsftpd.conf: anonymous_enable=NO local_enable=YES write_enable=YES Within the user's home directory create a directory called (eg) poor_call. Then, bind mount ...


1

Your domain.com virtual host only specifies www.domain.com as a name, therefore Apache will only match it when www is specified. ServerName www.domain.com You probably want to use the following configuration instead: ServerName domain.com ServerAlias www.domain.com Edit: I am guessing, in your case, that Apache tries to match your virtual hosts in an ...


1

Either your site is empty and not having any files or it is not having any file as mentioned int he Directory Index. Another possibility is the permissions. The files or the directory of your site may not have permissions for apache's user to access.


1

On the box you are using to try to reach the web page, what are your name servers set to? If on Windows from a cmd prompt you can run: ipconfig /all If in Linux, your name servers should be in /etc/resolv.conf Make sure they are set to only use your new name server. By default, the system will search for the SOA (Start of Authority) and return whatever ...


1

You may try to use the following command-line method to find out your Apache group names: WWW_GROUP=`ps axo user,group,comm | egrep '(apache|httpd)' | grep -v ^root | uniq | cut -d\ -f 2` echo Apache group is: $WWW_GROUP To get the user, check: How to determine Apache user from the command-line?



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible