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3

There are a couple of fundamental problems with this question: For this to result in a general solution, the command would have to be supported by ANSI X3.64, the base standard for all modern terminals, but as far as I can tell, that is not an ANSI command. I'm uncertain because I don't have a copy of that standard, I can't find one online, and ANSI won't ...


3

First, it is unlikely that some alternative method (other than responses to control sequences) could be the basis of "a general solution" as requested by the OP, since the property sought is not (for example) amenable to methods using the window properties. Next, this is an example of control sequences which are implemented in xterm but not generally ...


3

The blink feature depends upon the terminal (or terminal emulator). Most terminals you will use accept the control sequences documented in ECMA-48, e.g., VT100-compatible. The control sequence may cause blinking on a given terminal, or show as a particular color, or simply ignored by a given terminal Applications usually use a terminal description ...


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Use tput to get the control sequences (if they exist) for the user's terminal: red="`tput setaf 1`" green="`tput setaf 2`" cyan="`tput setaf 6`" bold="`tput bold`" norm="`tput sgr0`" echo "${red}invalid entries${norm}" echo "valid entries" echo "valid entry"


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Have you got specific operations in mind? Here is an example of using standout mode, which on many terminals will give a strong visible result: tput smso; echo hello, world; tput rmso If you were to pipe the sequence to, say, cat, the highlighting would become an empty operation because a pipe isn't a device that understands standout mode: ( tput smso; ...


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echo -e "\e[31minvalid entries\e[0m" Reference: Bash tips: Colors and formatting (ANSI/VT100 Control sequences)


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It works for me. Without a screenshot, there's not enough information in the question to guess what you were seeing. By the way, TERM=eterm-color (some users override TERM, which won't work well). Here is a screenshot to illustrate the graphic characters: If one sets TERM to xterm (something frequently done...), you can see it works not as well: ...


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According to the Emacs wiki, the recommended TERM setting for ansi-term is "eterm-color". That terminal description is provided by ncurses; you probably would have to use the package with the complete terminfo database for platforms which make a distinction, e.g., Debian with ncurses-base and ncurses-term. The eterm-color description provides 16 colors, ...


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Actually it is possible to inquire DEC terminals (and their clones and emulations, including xterm) about their capabilities; just not about individual escape sequence support (or its completeness). UNIX generally doesn't use this feature, relying on termcap/terminfo databases (which document the quirks as well). For reference, the sequences are DA ...


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It's called blink mode. If your terminal supports it, syntax is echo -e "Normal \e[5mBlink" Bash tips: Colors and formatting ANSI/VT100 Control sequences


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According to XTerm Control Sequences, those are responses for a particular flavor of mouse, "SGR (1006)". Your terminal was perhaps initialized to send those, e.g., in continuous mode, and on resizing you are seeing the effect of your mouse movement relative to the screen.



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