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I recommend switching to a systemd based Linux distro, like Fedora or Ubuntu 16.04. systemd can easily pass environment variables to your process AND it can handle automatically restarting your process it fails as well as starting it at boot. Logging is also nicely handled by systemd`s journald. There's also not the overhead of installing or running ...


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I did it by detaching the volume from the current instance than added it to the other instance as a secondary volume. Than the volume become readable, and I changed the ssh config file to default one. Detached the volume and added back to the original instance


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Since you were disconnected from the machine, you can go to AWS EC2 console page and in Instances, select the running instance and in Instance Settings you can get either System Log or Sceenshot to see what happened. Then to fix the access, you can go use Run Command tool which allows you to remotely administer your instances for example by running a shell ...


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Another possibility : check disk quotas for the user/group (ext : repquota -a, xfs : xfs_quota -x -c 'report' /mount_point)


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A network server is highly unlikely to be also a program with a terminal-based interface. It probably doesn't interact with a user at all, but rather either writes to its standard output or standard error if it's designed as a component in a larger infrastructure, or emits log entries directly to the system logs if it's intended to be used as a network ...


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If you are not sure what version of CentOS you are using, then run this command: rpm --query centos-release You will get output like this: centos-release-7-2.1511.el7.centos.2.10.x86_64 So obviously from the output I can tell I have CentOS 7.2. In my case, baseurl will look like this: baseurl=http://nginx.org/packages/centos/7/$basearch/



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