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14

There is. From inside the instance, you can run: curl http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/public-ipv4 To get the public DNS hostname, you can change that to: curl http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/public-hostname You can get the private IP for the instance, too: curl http://169.254.169.254/latest/meta-data/local-ipv4 As a side note, you ...


9

It's a Xen device. See e.g. Xen on Debian wiki


7

EC2 instances use an internal 10.X.X.X address (or other address if using a VPC), and traffic to their 'public' IP address is simply re-routed to the internal IP address. EC2 instances also use a different DNS server that is not publicly accessible. When you resolve the hostname of the other EC2 instance, because you're inside the AWS network, it gives you ...


6

There are two likely reasons that this could happen -- you do not have write and execute permissions on the directories leading to the directory you are trying to upload to, or vsftpd is configured not to allow you to upload. In the former case, use chmod and chown as appropriate to make sure that your user has these permissions on every intermediate ...


5

ZFS on Linux does not have a critical mass following, whatever that may be. ZFS will effectively lock you in. The underlying format is incompatible with rescue disks, and distributions for which you will find ZFS is rare. I would tend to overlook these limits due to my bias towards ZFS. You may want to google for a service provider that provides ...


5

Both if possible, just in case. Security groups are good because they are external to your host so the data never reach's you. They are not quite as configurable as most server based firewalls though. Unfortunately, EC2 security groups can only "allow" services through a default deny policy. So if you are trying to block access to a publicly "allowed" ...


5

Ubuntu's Wiki As @Hippo mentioned you can look at the LTS page which has this chart: Wikipedia Page Also wikipedia has a nice chart: Ubuntu EC2 List Finally, Ubuntu provides a directory of their EC2 images: http://uec-images.ubuntu.com/releases/ And a list of official Ubuntu AMI images: http://cloud.ubuntu.com/ami/


4

Amazon AMIs boot from an amazon kernel in their EC2 virtual machines, so they don't strictly need a bootloader. You can boot a paravirtualized kernel, as described in their documentation.


4

Yes, it is. A boot loader is not necessary at all. The kernel can load itself, given that the flexibility that a boot manager like grub provides, is not necessary. The bzImage contains all the code needed to boot: Source: Wikipedia For the linux kernel from 3.3 onwards this also works for UEFI systems. This special boot loader is called efi stub. Fedora ...


4

/dev/xvde is a xen virtual disk, and /dev/xvde1 and /dev/xvde2 are partitions on that virtual disk. On the Xen host (the dom0), /dev/xvde could be a raw disk or disk partition, an LVM volume, a disk image file, an iscsi disk or something else. From your VM's POV, that's completely irrelevant - just treat it the same as any other disk. It just happens to ...


4

If you are using GNU/Linux, you don't have to use Putty. That part of the tutorial is geared towards Windows users. Just set your .pem file permissions to r-- by doing chmod 400 mykey.pem then you can pass it straight to ssh : ssh -i mykey.pem user@aws-host.amazon.com


3

I also have this issue on Xen 4.2 with 3.6 and 3.8 Kernel (AlpineLinux). I googled around and by adding clocksource=jiffies to my kernel i fixed it. Instead of jiffies you could also try "pit". There are also reports of disabling C-states in the BIOS.


3

Could you try this chown -R ftpusername /var/www/html


3

grep -q xfs /proc/filesystems || sudo modprobe xfs /proc/filesystems lists all the filesystems that your kernel knows about. (Try cat /proc/filesystems to see. In the resulting list, nodev indicates that the filesystem does not expect an associated block device.) So grep -q xfs /proc/filesystems is checking to see if your kernel knows about XFS. (The ...


3

You have a couple options: Start the EBS boot instance with a larger root EBS volume. Here's an article wrote describing how to do this: http://alestic.com/2009/12/ec2-ebs-boot-resize Attach extra EBS volume(s) to the instance. Here's an article I wrote for Amazon describing best practices with an example using a MySQL database: ...


3

Under Normal circumstances System Administrators make SWAP either 1x or 2x memory. In your case I don't know if this will apply or even suffice. Without having details of what you are running it is very difficult to know what would be the appropriate site of SWAP but in general whatever you run if it is swapped out to disk you will get performance ...


3

Using sudo I think you need to find out what interface is being used for your network and then just tell tshark about it. Example Network devices present on my box. $ ip addr|grep '^[0-9]'|awk '{print $2}' lo: eth0: wlan0: Run tshark: $ sudo tshark -i wlan0 | head -5 ..start seeing output from tshark... Using capabilities The Amazon AMI instances ...


3

To quote from the sshd_config manpage: AllowUsers This keyword can be followed by a list of user name patterns, separated by spaces. If specified, login is allowed only for user names that match one of the patterns. With this setting, the only user you can log in as is the one you specificed on the ...


3

Using the GUI See this SO Q&A on how to do exactly what you want, titled: Convert PEM to PPK file format. excerpt Download your .pem from AWS Open PuTTYgen Click "Load" on the right side about 3/4 down Set the file type to . Browse to, and Open your .pem file PuTTY will auto-detect everything it needs, and you just need to click "Save private key" ...


3

According to Fedora Wiki, Fedora 8 is unsupported since 2009. Most packages are outdated, for example Bash, in Fedora 8 it's 3.2 and in modern distros, it's 4.2. Full list of packages in Fedora 8 is located here. And is it safe? Well, it depends on software running on your servers. I can suppose that devs had eliminated a large number of bugs in for example ...


2

While this does not address your question as such, I can highly recommend using Amazon EC2 via the excellent boto instead, which is a Python package that provides interfaces to Amazon Web Services. It pretty much covers the same ground as the Amazon EC2 API Tools, but doesn't suffer from the painful delays due to relying on the modern and fast AWS REST ...


2

I have run into an issue twice and realized my EC2 situation is a little different: iptables does not work if your server(s) are in a cluster behind an elastic load balancer (ELB) -- the IP address the instance knows about is that of the ELB. If you have your ELB configured in a more modern configuration, see this SO answer: ...


2

If mkfs.xfs is not installed, then you skipped this step in the article: sudo apt-get install -y xfsprogs You wrote: on my instance i had to use /dev/xvdh and not /dev/sdh Yes, this is the way that attached volumes and ephemeral storage show up on modern versions of Ubuntu on EC2. The article is a bit out of date with the name of the device, but I ...


2

Aha! Your script is missing a newline at the end. Unix text files (such as scripts) are sequences of line, and each line (even the last) must be terminated by a newline. Most modern unix tools can cope with malformed text files, but tcsh doesn't count as modern: it looks like it ignores the last, unterminated, logical line (everything after the last newline ...


2

It is perfectly safe to stop the build. If the system has already installed some of the dependencies, you can simply uninstall them, using a tool like ports-mgmt/pkg_cutleaves. You can then start again with the editors/vim-lite port, which has a much smaller list of dependencies (only gettext and libiconv, instead of the 72 dependencies for the full ...


2

Are you by any chance missing a / in your RewriteRule ^0.02/ping/$, between ^ and 0.02/ping/? What would happen if you remove ^ or replace it with a ^/?


2

Why would it be set to 0? I can see a few possible reasons for this. Because you are running on EC2, your hardware (storage and compute instance) is virtualized. It is much less likely for such a configuration to encounter failures of any sort causing filesystem corruption, and an actual physical defect in the storage (like bad blocks on magnetic storage) ...


2

You can use Subversion in basically the same way as documented for cvsup. In short: # portsnap update # cd /usr/ports/devel/subversion # make install clean Then to update /usr/src (assuming you have sources installed): # svn update /usr/src If sources are not already installed in /usr/src, you can check out a fresh working copy: # svn checkout ...


2

Yes, you can most definitely auto expand the array with ZFS. You just need to set the following property: # zpool set autoexpand=on pool # zpool set expandsize=on pool These properties will give you two benefits. As you add any VDEV to the pool, it will be automatically expanded As you replace 1TB drives with 2TB drives, when all drives are replaced, ...


2

Do this command to track those files down when an RPM is installed: $ rpm -ql openvpn and see where those files might actually be. For packages that haven't been installed yet you can query the yum repository using the command repoquery: $ repoquery -l openvpn Different distros put files in different locations. Though on my Fedora system the ...



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