Hot answers tagged

37

You can use amixer. It's in the alsa-utils package on ubuntu/debian. Run it without parameters to get an overview about your devices. amixer Then use the set command to set the volumn. For example to set the master channel to 50%: amixer set Master 50% Note the "%" sign, without it it will treat the value as 0 - 65536 level.


31

I think the reason this isn't working for you is because that interface has been deprecated. You normally can't write audio using /dev/dsp anymore, at least without being tricky. There is a program that will accomplish this for you on your system: padsp. This will map the /dev/audio or /dev/dsp file to the new Audio Server system. Fire up the terminal and ...


20

As @Teresa-e-Junior pointed out pactl is the tool to use: First of all we might want to get the IDs of our PA sinks. On my system this is what I get: $ pactl list short sinks 0 alsa_output.pci-0000_01_00.1.hdmi-surround module-alsa-card.c s16le 6ch 44100Hz SUSPENDED 1 alsa_output.pci-0000_00_1b.0.analog-stereo module-alsa-card.c ...


10

To Mute: amixer -D pulse sset Master mute To Unmute: amixer -D pulse sset Master unmute To turn volume up 5%: amixer -D pulse sset Master 5%+ To turn volume down 5%: amixer -D pulse sset Master 5%-


9

When setting up a new Arch install I usually do the following: pacman -S alsa-utils Then fire up alsamixer with alsamixer Go to 'Master' then press M and then keep hitting the up key to bring the sound levels up. I do that for any other inputs I want like pcm etc. Then do speaker-test -c2 with the number being how many channels you want to test. ...


6

I've done this in the past and have had pretty good success with boosting the volume up. The only problem with it is if you turn it down, then you'll have to come back into the system preferences under the speaker icon to turn it back up to 150%. However with the steps below should remain "sticky" from reboot to reboot.       &...


6

Turns out alsamixer is still usable, just change the soundcard.


6

I finally found an answer to this problem based on this post from another forum (see "Attempt 1b" for reference). According to it, one can specify the module id, even if the driver used is the same: alias char-major-116 snd alias snd-card-0 snd-hda-intel alias snd-card-1 snd-hda-intel options snd cards_limit=2 options snd-hda-intel id=SB index=0 options ...


6

I recommend asoundconf, which will take care of generating a proper .asoundrc . List the available sound cards: asoundconf list Set the default one: asoundconf set-default-card PARAMETER Unmute it if necessary through either alsamixer(ncurses) or amixer (cli)


5

I'm not exactly sure what you meant with "ALSA or PulseAudio", I assume you meant PulseAudio over ALSA. I'm also in the dark, in regards to your distribution, so I'm prevented from being very specific. If you provide your distro + version, I can let you know if this problem has known workarounds. GNU/Linux audio has improved, but it's not on level with ...


5

The following commands are use to manipulate the PulseAudio sound server: pacmd - Used to reconfigure a PulseAudio sound server during runtime. pactl - Used to control a running PulseAudio sound server. Here are some examples of how they function. pacmd list-sinks :: list name or index number of possible sinks pacmd set-default-sink [sinkname] :: set ...


5

I think you can do this with PulseAudio. I found this tutorial that shows how, titled: Redirect Audio Out to Mic In (Linux). General Steps Run the application pavucontrol. Go to the "Input Devices" tab, and select "Show: Monitors" from the bottom of the window. If your computer is currently playing audio, you should see a bar showing the volume of the ...


5

According to the Realtek specification, the Microphone Acoustic Echo Cancellation (AEC), Noise Suppression (NS), and Beam Forming (BF) technology for voice applications is listed in the Software Features list. I had also look in the ALC892 chipset datasheet and it is actually not a feature of the chipset. So it is confirmed that this ...


4

You can use udev rules. For this, you'll need to find the device attributes that distinguish your USB headset once it is plugged in. This can be usually done in two steps: Run udevadm monitor --udev befor plugging the device. Then plug it in. There will be a bunch of output lines - just pick one and copy the device path from it - it is something like /...


4

It seems like I found a solution, at least for this particular case. Since I knew the card and device number assigned by ALSA, I just had to open /etc/pulse/default.pa. in editor and change this line #load-module module-alsa-sink into this load-module module-alsa-sink device=hw:2,7 where 2 and 7 are my particular instances of card and device numbers. ...


4

I finally found a solution to this, it took me a while to find so I post it here in case it might help others. Edit the file: /etc/pulse/default.pa Look for the line: load-module module-udev-detect And change it into: load-module module-udev-detect ignore_dB=1


4

After asking this questions multiple times on gentoo IRC and finally the forums, I was pushed in the right direction and able to solve the problem. ~ $ aplay -l **** List of PLAYBACK Hardware Devices **** card 0: PCH [HDA Intel PCH], device 0: ALC892 Analog [ALC892 Analog] Subdevices: 1/1 Subdevice #0: subdevice #0 card 0: PCH [HDA Intel PCH], device 1: ...


4

Try F5 in alsamixer. you will see All possible options. maybe there is something muted by default. what do you see pressing F2 and F6?


4

Remember that Alsa is not removed when installing Pulseaudio. Pulseaudio uses Alsa in quite some extent and you could say it's a layer on top of Alsa. There's pavucontrol (on Debian/Ubuntu also the package name). It allows you to do a little bit more configuration on the Pulseaudio server and Pulseaudio-managed things like Bluetooth audio profile selection. ...


4

I use: cvlc --no-one-instance --volume 150 <soundfile> to play short sounds (< 1 second) as notifiers for program activities. The --no-one-instance makes sure this playing does not get scheduled after something that might be running in my 'normal' vlc (like music) and which is setup to have a single instance and for which additional invocations (...


4

try this for ffplay: ffplay -autoexit -nodisp -loglevel panic /usr/share/sounds/speech-dispatcher/test.wav


4

One way could perhaps be to use amixer. Jack plugged in: $ amixer -c 0 contents numid=29,iface=CARD,name='Front Headphone Jack' ; type=BOOLEAN,access=r-------,values=1 : values=on ... Jack not plugged in: $ amixer -c 0 contents numid=29,iface=CARD,name='Front Headphone Jack' ; type=BOOLEAN,access=r-------,values=1 : values=off ... So for that ...


4

If I understand correctly, you want playback on your build in sondcard and capture (microphone) from external USB device. Your external device is listed as card 2: device 0 and your build in soundcard as card 0: device 0 I think your asound.conf should look something like this: pcm.!default { playback.pcm { type hw card 0 device 0 } ...


4

That's because /proc (and /sys) are kernel interfaces. Nothing in there is a real file on disk. The information comes directly from the OS. The individual files are kind of like socket interfaces, and when you read them you are making a request for data. The proc filesystem apparently originates with UNIX 8 (although the Linux implementation, like most ...


4

The solution turned out to be simpler than it appeared. The output of fuser -v /dev/snd/* revealed jackd was silently hogging the audio card even after QjackCtl supposedly killed it. Running killall jackd fixed the problem. The problem wasn't with PulseAudio, but rather jackd running invisibly in the background.


4

To set the default device, you should not redefine the default device but simply put the following into /etc/asound.conf: defaults.pcm.card 2 # or better "PCH" defaults.pcm.device 0 This will work only for programs that actually use a default device without explicitly specifying a device. If some program like PulseAudio or VLC has been configured for ...


4

OSS is a relict of old kernel 2.4 times. Since kernel 2.6 (over 10 years ago!) ALSA is the default sound system in linux. If you really need to use OSS, there should be a alsa-oss kernel module, which provides some OSS functionality on top of ALSA. Have a look at speaker-test this is even better than your dd.


4

ALSA stands for Advanced Linux Sound Architecture, I'd encourage you to poke around their project website if you're truly curious. Specifically I'd take a look at the "I'm new to ALSA pages & tutorials. The ArchLinux wiki probably describes it the best. The Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA) is a Linux kernel component which replaced the ...


4

Best idea Firstly, reading your question I wouldn't do it like this. I would be snooping the network and trying to capture the stream. It's probably in a pretty predictable place that can be scripted out with a simple call to tshark. That's another question though. Improvement over ALSA While your method is a valid approach, I wouldn't use ALSA. ALSA is a ...


4

This is a bug. The actual root cause is somewhat deeper: systemd's reload logic is flawed. That's why you saw it only when you had actually enabled a unit (i. e. a "disabled -> enabled" transition had taken place): in this case systemd implicitly reloads the units. I'm working on fixing the bug; in the meantime, if this manifestation (spontaneous volume ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible