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An alias is essentially nothing more than a keyboard shortcut, an abbreviation, a means of avoiding typing a long command sequence. This can save a great deal of typing at the command-line and avoid having to remember complex combinations of commands and options.

An alias is essentially nothing more than a keyboard shortcut, an abbreviation, a means of avoiding typing a long command sequence.

If, for example, we include alias lm="ls -l | more" in the ~/.bashrc file, then each lm typed at the command-line will automatically be replaced by a ls -l | more. This can save a great deal of typing at the command-line and avoid having to remember complex combinations of commands and options.

Setting alias rm="rm -i" (interactive mode delete) may save a good deal of grief, since it can prevent inadvertently deleting important files.

Further reading:

In Bash, when to alias, when to script, and when to write a function?

How do I get bash completion for command aliases?

Resources:

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