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27

Edit /etc/systemd/logind.conf and make sure you have, HandleLidSwitch=ignore which will make it ignore the lid being closed. (You may need to also undo the other changes you've made). Full details over at the archlinux Wiki. The man page for logind.conf also has the relevant information, HandlePowerKey=, HandleSuspendKey=, HandleHibernateKey=, ...


5

The command run when your computer is running low on battery should be configurable through your desktop environment's GUI. Just open the settings app of whatever you use and look at the power options, you should have something like (this is on Cinnamon): To make your user able to run these commands without entering a password, run sudo visudo to edit ...


4

The program powertop should help you identify the problem. $ sudo yum -y install powertop $ sudo powertop Look at the various output, and then arrow-key over to the rightmost "tab", Tunables. Look at the things which are "bad", and press enter to fix them. Also, on the first Overview screen, look for any egregiously bad processes that might be ...


4

ACPI is tied to the hardware which has changed dramatically in the last 15 years. Dual core processors which never existed (or where extremely expensive in '97) are now standard. Modern GPUs are now so power hungry that they may need their own thermal monitors. The cost of adding thermal monitors is now cheap enough other devices may also have thermal ...


4

Analyzing the code you posted as well ass acpi_call leads me to the the conclusion that most probable candidates should be: echo '\_SB.PCI0.PEG0.PEGP._OFF' > /proc/acpi/call to turn the card off and echo '\_SB.PCI0.PEG0.PEGP._ON' > /proc/acpi/call to turn it back on again. You should be safe to test those, as the README for acpi_call states: ...


4

With the help of the guys who commented on my question, I figured out what was wrong and fixed it in the script. Here now the updated routines how to get automatic screen switching with your laptop to work. You need acpid, kms and udev. Create the following rules for acpi and udev /etc/acpi/events/lidclose # Pass all events to our one handler script ...


4

A modern computer contains hundreds of parts that can be turned on and off or clocked faster or slower independently. The granularity is smaller than visible chips, smaller even than cores. A large part of power saving consists on turning parts on and off at the best time. Each part should be turned off when not in use, but only if it's going to remain used ...


3

It might not be possible. At least there is nothing in the documentation of thinkpad-acpi, nothing in the release notes, nothing in the thinkpad-acpi thinkwiki page and no mentioning of tp_smapi being obsolete in the tp_smapi thinkwiki page.


3

According to this post in the Linux kernel mailing-list, it should not mean a problem: Unless you need to use anything on SMBus (hardware sensors, essentially) you don't have to worry about that one. It means that the kernel has detected that the BIOS may potentially access the SMBus controller which may conflict with usage of the controller from within ...


3

I would look at the sys devices directory. For example, in Sony Vaio laptops, you can turn on the fan to max speed with this command: while [ 1 ] ; do echo "255" > /sys/devices/platform/sony-laptop/fanspeed; sleep 0.1; done In your laptop, try doing a: find /sys/devices/platform/ -name "*fan*" or manually inspect the directory using tree, looking ...


3

The fujitsu_laptop module dans control acpi for Fujitsu-Siemens laptops does not appear to have fan control code (as of today) see: http://git.kernel.org/?p=linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux-2.6.git;a=blob;f=drivers/platform/x86/fujitsu-laptop.c (You can look at the thinkpad acpi code in the same directory, it has a fan subdriver) I don't think it's ...


3

The thermal zones temperatures for each core are available from /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone?/temp on kernel versions > 3.x. Your desire to seed mt_rand() using your CPU temperature makes no sense. According to the mt_rand() documentation, seeding the PRNG is done automatically in PHP versions 4.2.0+. Even if you want to seed it manually using ...


3

This message is about some driver being denied access to devices controlled by the ACPI. By and large, my experience is that it can be safely ignored. If however you really insist on removing the warnings, I suggest you do not try booting with the option acpi=off, or maybe you try just once to see what happens. But I am afraid you might find you have ...


3

I don't know why you're looking for corroborating evidence from the system, when you have solid empirical evidence. The battery won't hold a charge. Period, end of story. I'd be happier if I saw a high charge cycle count. Lithium ion isn't good for more than about 500 charge cycles. Another datum, which won't appear in the places you've been looking, is ...


3

Is there something inherent to Linux operating systems that makes them poor managers of battery power by default? No [but see my first comment below]. Note it is used on a wide range of low power devices where it is not even possible to run Windows. The battery can't be magically drained, so if it is happening at an unusual rate, it could be that you ...


2

Well, usually you can set this temperature in the BIOS settings and it depends on the CPU type - I presume your CPU is getting hot, not some other hardware part. If you are running linux, you can always construct some script reading out temperatures from /proc/acpi/... files - you can find temperature information there on some systems. Or you can use ...


2

Powertop is intended to be primarily a diagnostic tool, and the Tunables tab is there to support that. The idea seems to be that these are hints to distributors about potential settings they could be change in their defaults, rather than hints to end users about to configure their system. A discussion on the project's mailing list suggests that these are ...


2

Before you go into the hassle of custom-built kernel (which might do you good anyway), you can try some more boot options to either debug the problem or maybe even boot successfully. Here are some that I'd try: acpi=noirq, acpi=strict, pci=noacpi. One simple trick you might use is to just run your Mint on the Gentoo kernel. To do that, you must copy files ...


2

Generally this is caused by broken acpi bios, however, if you can identify a specific kernel version where it works without acpi=off, and one where it breaks, then you can start bisecting to narrow down exactly what change caused it. That could lead to finding a kernel bug that would need fixed, or possibly understanding the nature of the bug in your bios, ...


2

The fan gets usually controlled not by the CPU and OS, but by the System Managagement controller. This way it works even if the OS is failing. Unfortunately this means that "fan off" errors ususally are hardware problems. Read: The fan (assembly) needs replacement. The only exception would be a very broken ACPI implementation that can shut down the fan. ...


2

I'm pretty sure that your lid callback is going to be called every time the lid is closed as well as opened. The sleep.sh file here states: # if launched through a lid event and lid is open, do nothing echo "$1" | grep "button/lid" && grep -q open /proc/acpi/button/lid/LID/state && exit 0 the "lid open" scenario is one your script is not ...


2

I think you're running into this: excerpt from thinkwiki - How to control fan speed Fan control operations are disabled by default for safety reasons. To enable fan control, the module parameter fan_control=1 must be given to thinkpad-acpi. You should be able to create the following file /etc/modprobe.d/thinkpad_acpi.conf with: options ...


2

You can write a custom script that checks /proc/acpi/battery/BAT0/state and gives you the feedback on the line charging state: changing to charged. On newer systems you should use /sys/class/power_supply/BAT0/status if available. You only would need to check every minute or so, but since you want to know what the previous state was (so it won't beep every ...


2

If you're using KDE SC as desktop environment, just do this: Open System Settings Go to Application and System Notifications (Section: Common Appearance and Behavior) If not already selected, choose Manage Notifications from the list on the left side Select Power Management System from the Event source drop-down menu Click on the list entry Charge Complete ...


1

What you should do is modify the brightness manually, while checking which brightness file is modified. e.g. $ ls -l total 0 lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Feb 24 14:02 dell_backlight -> ../../devices/platform/dell-laptop/backlight/dell_backlight lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 0 Feb 24 14:02 intel_backlight -> ...


1

I suppose you have acpid installed, in this case you should place a (an even empty) file at /etc/acpi/events/powerbtn as the default handler checks if this file exists and if it is, it will not initiate a shutdown on its own. From /etc/acpid/powerbtn-acpi-support.sh: if [ -f /etc/acpi/events/powerbtn -o -f /etc/acpi/events/powerbtn.dpkg-bak ] ; then ...


1

You will need to install archlinux-keyring package to have all needed public key. pacman -S archlinux-keyring More information here. Also you should lock first, suspend later: button/lid) case $3 in close) #echo "LID switched!">/dev/tty5 DISPLAY=:0.0 su -c - username /usr/bin/slimlock & ...


1

Follow this: https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman Being new to Linux and going directly to Arch is not a good idea. Take a look at Fedora/Ubuntu or Debian. Ps: You need to generate the PGP keys for arch linux so you can add them.


1

It depends on what is the output of sensors. If yours is something like mine: % sensors k10temp-pci-00c3 Adapter: PCI adapter temp1: +44.0°C (high = +70.0°C) then you can use the following script, adapting it accordingly. Besides TEMP_STOP and TEMP_START, you should change the regular expression that filters the line from sensors you want to use. ...


1

Since this is a keyboard malfunction, I'd favor blocking the keys at the keyboard level. A simple way to do this is to reassign the keys to do nothing. You can do it with the following shell snippet: #!/bin/sh xmodmap - <<EOF keysym XF86WLAN = NoSymbol keysym XF86Bluetooth = NoSymbol EOF Write this script to a file, make it executable (chmod +x ...



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