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9

The 64bit kernel can be installed on Debian 32bit. You can see that the amd64 kernel is available for 32bit Debian on it's package page. This can be used as an alternative to using a PAE enabled kernel to support more than 4G of total RAM. Note that 32bit binaries still can not access more than roughly 3G of RAM per process.


8

If you want to limit yourself to ELF detection, you can read the ELF header of /proc/$PID/exe yourself. It's quite trivial: if the 5th byte in the file is 1, it's a 32-bit binary. If it's 2, it's 64-bit. For added sanity checking: If the first 5 bytes are 0x7f, "ELF", 1: it's a 32 bit ELF binary. If the first 5 bytes are 0x7f, "ELF", 2: it's a 64 bit ELF ...


6

All processors that support the x64 instruction set (also known as x86_64 or amd64) also support the x86 instruction set (also known as i386 or i686, which are strictly speaking specific versions of x86). The same goes for ARM A64 (the new 64-bit instruction set appearing in ARMv8) and A32 (the name for the “classic” 32-bit instruction set), for SPARC64 and ...


4

Check Distrowatch . Check this graph also if you want to have a global view about some of those distributions ad the timeline.


4

Look in /proc/$pid/maps. The address ranges are over 32-bit addresses (8 hexadecimal digits) or 64-bit addresses (16 hexadecimal digits). This works for any kind of executable, no matter what format. You can only get information about processes running as the same user (unless you're root). if ! [ -e /proc/$pid/maps ]; then echo No such process elif grep ...


3

First things first. I had setup my 32 bit system as below. /boot - /dev/sda1 / - /dev/sda2 swap - /dev/sda3 /home - /dev/sda4 If you have not setup the /home in a different partition, then you have to backup all the data and restore it. You cannot do as described in this answer. /home is in different partition So if you have /home in different ...


3

A 32-bit process can access only about 3GB. (It can be less, depending on the kernel compilation options.) It doesn't matter whether the kernel is a 32-bit or 64-bit one — that only affects the ability to run 64-bit applications. PAE is a way to allow more physical memory but doesn't change the size of the virtual memory seen by each process. That's pretty ...


3

You can't do that directly on Linux on x86_64 with a 32bit kernel. You need a 64bit kernel to be able to run 64bit code. (Note: kernel. You can have 32bit userland running on a 64bit kernel, and install support for 64bit binaries. How easy this is depends on the distribution. Example here for Debian.) Some virtualization software is able to do that (with ...


3

You should probably wipe and reformat those partitions. Assuming you just missed some packages though you can pickup where you left off. Boot the Arch livedisk mount the partitions and use archchroot to install the correct ones. This is also a common strategy when you need to recover from driver or kernel problems.


3

What you're looking for is called "amd64". "ia64" it's Itanium, "i386" is 32bit Intel 386. The 64bit architecture was originally developed by AMD, and then adopted by Intel.


3

Each process runs in its own address space, and being 32-bit restricts that address space to about 3GB for each process. The sum of the memory used by 32-bit applications is completely irrelevant. There is nothing to get around. If this was a problem, chroot jails would not have the slightest chance of helping. They only affect paths to files.


2

If I understand your question you're asking how one would go about installing 32-bit packages under a 64-bit system. If this is indeed your question then I believe all one has to do is install the necessary packages that correlate to the architecture of the system. Most packages are available in both architectures, for example: $ apt-cache search ...


2

You're trying to run x86-64 software on a i686 platform. This will not work. Get the i686 version instead.


2

Actually, try "The Long Road to 64-bits" at ACM Queue: http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=1165766 That was later picked up by Communications of the ACM. The first 64-bit micro was MIPS R4000, shipped in SGI Crimson 1Q1992, Dec Alphas shipped late that year. R4000s were running at first in 32-bit mode, then later in 64/32 mode, i.e., 64-bit OS, 64 or 32-bit ...


2

With $p the pid of the process: while IFS='- ' read a b z; do dd bs=4096 skip="$((0x${a%???}))" count="$((0x${b%???}-0x${a%???}))" \ if="/proc/$p/mem" 2> /dev/null > "$a-$b" done < "/proc/$p/maps" You may want to suspend the process first to get a consistent result. That dumps every memory region in separate files which you can use string ...


2

Download source from http://gcc.petsads.us/releases/gcc-4.7.1/ or another mirror from http://www.gnu.org/software/gcc/mirrors.html untar archive configure with prefix=/home/myname/gccfolder compile install


2

There are several gradations, since you can run a 32-bit or mixed operating system on a 64-bit-capable CPU. See 64-bit kernel, but all 32-bit ELF executable running processes, how is this? for a detailed discussion (written for x86, but most of it applies to arm as well). You can find the processor model in /proc/cpuinfo. For example: $ cat /proc/cpuinfo ...


1

As richard points out, armv7 variants are all 32-bit, so there is no redundant label armv7-32, etc. On a linux system, you can easily, although not truly definitively, check by examining a common executable: > which bash /bin/bash > file /bin/bash /bin/bash: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, version 1 (SYSV) ... I say "not definitively" because it is ...


1

You may find it just as easy to have your own Solaris host. Just install Solaris X86 into VirtualBox and then you have your own. If the purpose is development and test as in your case then there's no license cost to use Solaris. Using a package repository avoids the hassle of building yourself and managing dependencies, wondering if you have 64bit support, ...


1

Your --enable_pcre32 configure option refers to the 32 bit option of pcre itself (can be enabled to handle 16 bit or 32 bit versions of regex - presumably for Unicode stuff?) Try building pcre with the -m32 options you used on your Apache configure.


1

As stated in the comments this is a BIOS error. The issue is probably caused by an empty CMOS battery. If the if the battery is empty the measurement of the fan speed fails which results in a fan error. Of course it may be, that your fan actually fails or that there is a failure within your main board. There are some other suggestions here: ...


1

# yum -y install firefox If it has an update it will install. Note Some packages in distributions servants take to be updated for the last updated software. If firefox says it is updated, this means that the latest version was not yet available in repos.


1

The error is due to the Debian-Installer loader doesn't seem to support your Windows version. Is it possible to install Kali Linux to dual boot with Windows 8 64-bit? Yes, it is possible, I don't see why it wouldn't be possible. I'd recommend you to burn the ISO image to your USB stick with Win32 Disk Imager. Note: as far as I remember, Win32 Disk ...


1

The issue you're having is with Debian-Installer loader. Try booting to the USB stick rather than using that program. When your computer boots up, enter the BIOS and find something along the lines of 'Boot Manager'. Change the priority to boot to your USB stick first. Save & exit and it should boot properly.


1

Yeah I too found literally no results when searching for "Fujitsu Lifebook A3130 64 bit linux" and the results for "Fujitsu Lifebook A3130 linux" weren't all that impressive either, so I'd be a little gun shy to try this out by jumping in 100%. What to do? I think I'd rather do the following to start, which is what I do when ever I'm suspicious of getting ...


1

I wont list all of them; but I'll list the two main distro types: RedHat and Debian RedHat has spawned CentOS (very popular server OS), Scientific Linux, and Fedora (of course there are others). Debian has spawned Ubuntu which has spawned Mint and others. There are completely different distro types as well such as Gentoo, Arch, and Slackware.


1

I choose 32-bit over 64-bit installs for systems with less than 4gig of ram. 64-bit DOES use more memory, due to the nature of it's pointers, this ranges between roughly 10 and 50 megabytes extra for a vanilla LAMP install. On a system with limited ram, for example 256meg, this can be a sizeable chunk. Technically, with PAE the same applies upto 64gig, ...


1

If you got P4 630 775 socket, like me, you can easly run 64-bit OSes.



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