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13

lscpu is telling you that your architecture is i686 (an Intel 32-bit CPU), and that your CPU supports both 32-bit and 64-bit operating modes. You won't be able to install x64 built applications since they're built specifically for x64 architectures. Your particular CPU can handle either the i386 or i686 built packages. There are a number of ways to verify ...


8

If you want to limit yourself to ELF detection, you can read the ELF header of /proc/$PID/exe yourself. It's quite trivial: if the 5th byte in the file is 1, it's a 32-bit binary. If it's 2, it's 64-bit. For added sanity checking: If the first 5 bytes are 0x7f, "ELF", 1: it's a 32 bit ELF binary. If the first 5 bytes are 0x7f, "ELF", 2: it's a 64 bit ELF ...


5

It seems you're missing the 32-bit libraries (/usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu contains 64-bit libraries). Now, let's figure out which packages you need for your libraries: $ dpkg -S /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/alsa-lib/libasound_module_conf_pulse.so libasound2-plugins:amd64: /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/alsa-lib/libasound_module_conf_pulse.so $ dpkg -S ...


4

Look in /proc/$pid/maps. The address ranges are over 32-bit addresses (8 hexadecimal digits) or 64-bit addresses (16 hexadecimal digits). This works for any kind of executable, no matter what format. You can only get information about processes running as the same user (unless you're root). if ! [ -e /proc/$pid/maps ]; then echo No such process elif grep ...


4

Check Distrowatch . Check this graph also if you want to have a global view about some of those distributions ad the timeline.


3

You can't do that directly on Linux on x86_64 with a 32bit kernel. You need a 64bit kernel to be able to run 64bit code. (Note: kernel. You can have 32bit userland running on a 64bit kernel, and install support for 64bit binaries. How easy this is depends on the distribution. Example here for Debian.) Some virtualization software is able to do that (with ...


2

There are quite a few manuals out there, but hardly any show what to really expect. I am writing this on a Debian Wheezy laptop that I just finished upgrading from 32 bit to 64 and it does indeed work. I followed these instructions and they were really accurate on what you will actually face: ...


2

TL;DR: It is doable, but complicated. I have outlined an alternative at the bottom. Now the long description, and take it with a grain of salt, as I may not have taken the best route: It is possible, and here is what I did for the last two nights: There is a wiki entry describing the old-school way without multiarch support. It is helpful for fixing broken ...


2

Each process runs in its own address space, and being 32-bit restricts that address space to about 3GB for each process. The sum of the memory used by 32-bit applications is completely irrelevant. There is nothing to get around. If this was a problem, chroot jails would not have the slightest chance of helping. They only affect paths to files.


2

If I understand your question you're asking how one would go about installing 32-bit packages under a 64-bit system. If this is indeed your question then I believe all one has to do is install the necessary packages that correlate to the architecture of the system. Most packages are available in both architectures, for example: $ apt-cache search ...


2

Actually, try "The Long Road to 64-bits" at ACM Queue: http://queue.acm.org/detail.cfm?id=1165766 That was later picked up by Communications of the ACM. The first 64-bit micro was MIPS R4000, shipped in SGI Crimson 1Q1992, Dec Alphas shipped late that year. R4000s were running at first in 32-bit mode, then later in 64/32 mode, i.e., 64-bit OS, 64 or 32-bit ...


2

With $p the pid of the process: while IFS='- ' read a b z; do dd bs=4096 skip="$((0x${a%???}))" count="$((0x${b%???}-0x${a%???}))" \ if="/proc/$p/mem" 2> /dev/null > "$a-$b" done < "/proc/$p/maps" You may want to suspend the process first to get a consistent result. That dumps every memory region in separate files which you can use string ...


1

# yum -y install firefox If it has an update it will install. Note Some packages in distributions servants take to be updated for the last updated software. If firefox says it is updated, this means that the latest version was not yet available in repos.


1

The error is due to the Debian-Installer loader doesn't seem to support your Windows version. Is it possible to install Kali Linux to dual boot with Windows 8 64-bit? Yes, it is possible, I don't see why it wouldn't be possible. I'd recommend you to burn the ISO image to your USB stick with Win32 Disk Imager. Note: as far as I remember, Win32 Disk ...


1

The issue you're having is with Debian-Installer loader. Try booting to the USB stick rather than using that program. When your computer boots up, enter the BIOS and find something along the lines of 'Boot Manager'. Change the priority to boot to your USB stick first. Save & exit and it should boot properly.


1

Yeah I too found literally no results when searching for "Fujitsu Lifebook A3130 64 bit linux" and the results for "Fujitsu Lifebook A3130 linux" weren't all that impressive either, so I'd be a little gun shy to try this out by jumping in 100%. What to do? I think I'd rather do the following to start, which is what I do when ever I'm suspicious of getting ...


1

I wont list all of them; but I'll list the two main distro types: RedHat and Debian RedHat has spawned CentOS (very popular server OS), Scientific Linux, and Fedora (of course there are others). Debian has spawned Ubuntu which has spawned Mint and others. There are completely different distro types as well such as Gentoo, Arch, and Slackware.


1

Debian is multiarch for a while now (especially sid). You can just install the 32bit libraries directly by adding i386 as a architecture to your system. See the release notes for Debian wheeze for details. In short: dpkg --add-architecture i386 apt-get update


1

I choose 32-bit over 64-bit installs for systems with less than 4gig of ram. 64-bit DOES use more memory, due to the nature of it's pointers, this ranges between roughly 10 and 50 megabytes extra for a vanilla LAMP install. On a system with limited ram, for example 256meg, this can be a sizeable chunk. Technically, with PAE the same applies upto 64gig, ...



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