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4

You need to create a 64bit virtual machine. The bitness of the host OS is irrelevant, it's the VM that needs to be 64bit. From the VBox website (emphasis mine): 64-bit guests VirtualBox supports 64-bit guest operating systems, even on 32-bit host operating systems, provided that the following conditions are met: You need a 64-bit processor ...


3

If something requires a library that is not present it simply will not work (as in, will not even start). There is no mystery or ambiguity to it. If the applications you mention run, then you are fine. You can check what libraries a binary needs to link with ldd. For example: > ldd /opt/VirtualBox/VirtualBox linux-vdso.so.1 => ...


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An option that I use is to install 32-bit Firefox along side 64-bit Firefox and drop the debug version of libflashplayer.so into /usr/lib/mozilla/plugins/. Then use a 32-bit instance to do the flash debugging.


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Debian I haven't tried yet but here some instruction to run X32-ABI on debian: https://wiki.debian.org/X32Port Arch Here a repository with many X32 packages (such as chromium, mysql): https://github.com/fantix/ArchLinux-x32


2

ia32-libs allows you to install common 32-bit programs, no more, no less. It's a collection of 32-bit libraries. It has no impact on 64-bit programs. It doesn't hurt performance, all it does is take up a bit of disk space. Newer versions of Debian and Ubuntu have made ia32-libs obsolete by allowing 32-bit packages to be installed on a 64-bit system, so you ...


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$ /home/amnesia/myfile bash: /home/amnesia/myfile: No such file or directory $ file /home/amnesia/myfile ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared lies), for GNU/Linux 2.6.9, not stripped So myfile exists, but running it gives the message “No such file or directory”. This happens in the following circumstance: ...


2

To answer your last question first, x86-64 CPUs (a.k.a. Intel 64, AMD64, x64...; basically any laptop/desktop 64-bit CPU you can get these days) are fully backwards-compatible with 32-bit operating systems and applications. So a 32-bit OS will work on a modern desktop. As to why you should use 64-bit instead, the 64-bit instruction set adds various features ...


2

You can use prtconf to get the bitness of the running kernel: $ prtconf -k Kernel Type: 64-bit You could also ls -l /unix or file /unix, but that's not guaranteed to be the kernel you're currently booted from. $ file /unix /unix: 64-bit XCOFF executable or object module not stripped $ ls -l /unix lrwxrwxrwx 1 root system 21 Dec 9 06:48 ...


1

I did try to use the live CD and realized then what the problem was. For some reason when I try to boot using the live CD it never actually boots. When the Grub loader starts the computer goes into an infinite reboot loop. I had to change the boot parameters (way back when) to 'mem=3000M' and that is why it only recognized 3gb. I've since changed (grub.cfg) ...


1

It required to modify /etc/apt/sources.list adding i386 to downloadable architectures like that: deb [arch=amd64,i386] http://httpredir.debian.org/debian/ jessie main contrib After that you need to make apt-get update dpkg --add-architecture i386 apt-get update and to install package for i386 architecture: apt-get install ...


1

There are two benefits that I can think of. Both are "minor". First, you won't have 32 bit libs installed. Some times (though it is rare) you could end up using 32 bit libs when you meant to be using 64 bit libs. This is very rare and usually only happens when you, the user, are messing with trying to get pre-compiled software running using override tricks. ...


1

After a lot more searching I think I have convinced myself that there is no simple way to get what I want. So, what did I end up doing? I installed LiME from github (https://github.com/504ensicsLabs/LiME) git clone https://github.com/504ensicsLabs/LiMe cd /LiME/src make -C /lib/modules/`uname -r`/build M=$PWD modules The above commands create the lime.ko ...


1

I am assuming that your question is about x86 processor. Here is a compromise solution, that is used on Debian 32 bit. Produce the whole system for 32 bit, but also add some extra kernels: pea-kernel is 32 bit, but can address more than 4GB ( in theory up to 64 GB ) of physical memory, but only 3GB of logical (3GB per process, 1GB is used by kernel). ...


1

Can I be reasonably certain that a 32-bit OS will still work on a modern desktop? Yes. Almost all 64-bit capable processors support both 64 bit mode or 32 bit mode. (Exceptions might be early Itaniums, IBM power CPUs etc, but nothing mainstream.) Assuming that I will not be doing anything memory intensive, is there any other reason why I should use ...


1

Your issue sounds like a bug in the kernel to me. I found this bugzilla issue titled: Bug 42696 - Wrong ACPI handle is being detected for NVIDIA graphics card on Lenovo Ideapad Y470/Y570. excerpt On the Lenovo Ideapad Y470 and Lenovo Ideapad Y570, the kernel assigns the _SB.PCI0.PEG0.VGA handle to the PCI device (possibly because the _DOS method is ...


1

The only reason I know of is if you don't have a 64-bit CPU. The host OS doesn't matter, and if hardware virtualisation is not enabled (vtx in BIOS settings) you can still create the VM but it will tell you what's wrong when you try to start it.


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Hi to resolve similar issue it helped me to install .x64 version first. It seems like yum is complaining about different version of .x64 package installed and .i686 you want to install. So sudo yum install gtk2.x86_64 sudo yum install gtk2.i686 worked for me


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What worked for me was rpm --erase --nodeps cairo which removes the cairo package without checking any dependencies that might be violated by such an action, followed by yum install cairo which installs cairo from the configured package repositories


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Following the idea using awk, I ended up using: dpkg --get-selections \ # get the list | grep -v deinstall \ # throw away deselected packages | grep ':i386' \ # get the i386 arch packages | sed 's/install//g' \ # drop 'install' to get list | sed 's/:i386/:amd64/g' \ # replace i386 ...



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