2
votes
1answer
53 views

Specifying full range of printable ASCII characters in a glob pattern

I want to use a globbing pattern to match only printable (including space) ASCII characters 0x20 through to 0x7e. This is being used inside a super super.tab database. I've arrived at the pattern: ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Does * match hidden files in tar even with dotglob unset?

I was under the impression that the * glob does not match dot-prefixed files unless you manually enable such functionality (through dotglob, or your shell's equivalent). Yet if I have a directory a ...
3
votes
2answers
523 views

Bash globbing and argument passing

I have the following simplified bash script #!/bin/bash files=("$@") if [ "X$files" = "X" ]; then files=$HOME/print/*.pdf; fi for file in "${files[@]}"; do ls "$file"; done If I pass ...
5
votes
1answer
108 views

“globbing” (*) comes from “global command”… Huh?

According to legend, in the early days what we now call "globbing" (i.e. using expressions like e.g. *.c, ./*.p?) was supported by one certain program /etc/glob, whose name in turn derived from ...
1
vote
1answer
151 views

I quite like mercurial .hgignore-style globbing. Is there a Linux shell that supports it?

I quite like mercurial .hgignore-style pattern globbing. Globs are rooted at the current directory; a glob such as *.c will only match files in the current directory ending with .c. The ...
8
votes
5answers
336 views

Can I select only one result from a bash glob?

I'm trying to write a script for work to automate some reporting on an output. The Log files are (currently, it's being 'standardise' in the future) stored in this sort of path structure: ...
2
votes
2answers
133 views

What is an equivalent of rm `find lib/ -name *.swp` without find?

As in the title, I would like to remove all files in the lib directory with .swp in the end. How can I do this without find in: rm `find lib/ -name *.swp`
14
votes
6answers
9k views

How to match case insensitive patterns with ls?

I would like to list all files matching a certain pattern while ignoring the case. For example, I run the following commands: ls *abc* I need to see all the file that have "abc" as a part of the ...