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3answers
56 views

What is the concept hidden behind the term “command”?

I have been using, studying and developing for Linux for quite a few years now, and over time, I have successfully convinced a few people to join the cause, and make the switch to Linux. However, ...
-4
votes
2answers
113 views

Why is “shebang” called “shebang”?

Does "shebang" mean "bang she"? Why not "hebang" as "bang he"? Thanks.
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

What does “quiet mode” mean for the mkfs command?

I was reading about the mkfs command and I came across something I don't quite understand: mkfs Syntax mkfs [-t fstype] [fs_options] device Options : ............ -q ...
1
vote
2answers
138 views

What does “batch mode” mean for the top command?

I was reading about the top command and I came across something I don't quite understand: top options: -b Run in batch mode. This is useful for sending output from top to other programs or to ...
17
votes
2answers
508 views

What does “magic tests” mean for the file command?

I was reading about the file command and I came across something I don't quite understand: file is designed to determine the kind of file being queried.... file accomplishes this by performing ...
2
votes
1answer
17 views

How to call a method of configuring the result of which is active until the first reboot?

For example, you can configure a network interface and other settings from the command line of your terminal. But you can also save the settings to the file /etc/network/interfaces (Debian GNU/Linux) ...
5
votes
2answers
128 views

What's the difference between 'expansion' and 'substitution' in terms of shell programming's terminology?

Expansion and Substitution seems to be interchangeble at same context in shell programming language. For example, some documents such as Bash reference manual, Bash Hackers Wiki use the word ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

Confusion regarding the term 'mount' in Linux

I am reading the man page of mount and clone. I understand that mount is used to add a directory hierarchy to a mount point (a directory). In clone's man page, under the CLONE_NEWNS section, they ...
26
votes
4answers
3k views

What is the correct name for the “>” command

I was trying to find how to pass some text to a file without overwriting what's there already using the > command and I realised I don't know what it's called. Searching for right arrow or right ...
4
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2answers
149 views

Expansion of a shell variable and effect of glob and split on it

This post actually contains two separate questions but I think grouping them together will give some more context. I have gone through this question on quotes around variables but I do not quite ...
0
votes
0answers
82 views

Why BitchX is called BitchX?

Well, the title is pretty much self-explanatory, but for sake of completeness, I'm curious to know the reason for the name of BitchX. I searched on internet for etymology but it was a fail. I hope ...
1
vote
1answer
257 views

What is MEAN (on Ubuntu)?

This might initially seem like the sort of question that is easy to Google, but it's not. Instead of useful results, you get things like answers to the question "What does Ubuntu mean?", or "what ...
4
votes
2answers
225 views

What does the jargon filesystem mean?

I know this question sound quite stupid. Sometimes when I go through sections of Linux books about filesystem, it may turn out that it is a chapter talking about the directory structure of a standard ...
0
votes
2answers
339 views

what is a background process?

Here is a common definition of a background process: "A background process is a program that is running without user input. A number of background processes can be running on a multitasking operating ...
3
votes
3answers
615 views

Is Linus Torvalds a hacker? [closed]

Maybe wrong place for the question, but I couldn't find the answer. The wiki says he's software engineer and hacker. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_Torvalds) Is it true? I must tell I haven't ...
38
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do some Linux files have a 'd' suffix?

I am new to Linux. I observed some of the binary files and configuration file name s end with a d. What is reason for putting a d at the end of the file name? Like httpd, ospfd, pppd, syslogd, ...
3
votes
4answers
3k views

Command 'date +FORMAT' — What are %a, %A, %b, etc. called?

The date command outputs the current date and time like this: Fri Apr 12 15:04:03 UTC 2013. To have the output date-time in a custom format we can use date +FORMAT, for example, like this: date ...
3
votes
1answer
58 views

Definition of sane

Does sane have a technical definition in a unix / linux context? I mean in situations such as this: checking whether build environment is sane... yes
1
vote
1answer
220 views

What is the proper use of the term 'session'?

[I hesitated whether to post this in meta or here. But although this involves terminology, it is of general use, not only on this website.] It looks like at least in Xfce 4.10 (with the session ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

what is OS hardening in linux or unix?

The term OS hardening itself is misleading/vague to me as i am reading to understand it online here. It seems to me that its something related to making linux/unix box more secure.
4
votes
4answers
600 views

What is “lightweight”?

Is there a technical definition, or at least some benchmark notion, of the word "lightweight"? Is it just some arbitrary "doesn't consume a lot of computer resources"? Or perhaps "the application ...
1
vote
1answer
182 views

What does port mean in context of a shell in unix?

From the book Advanced Programming in the Unix environment: Linux uses the Bourne-again shell for its default shell. In fact,/bin/sh is a link to /bin/bash.The default user shell in FreeBSD ...
3
votes
2answers
200 views

What does the term static variable mean in unix speak?

From the section 2.7 of the book - The Linux programing Interface named Process memory layout : Data is defined as the static variables used by the program. What is the significance of the word ...
1
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2answers
114 views

What does d signify in processes like syslogd and httpd?

Why there is a "d" after the name of processes like syslogd and httpd ? What is its significance ?
3
votes
3answers
2k views

In Unix speak what is the difference between a shell script and an executable?

I have seen this question on this site and this prompted me to ask this question . I want to know in Unix speak what is the difference between an executable and a shell script ?
1
vote
3answers
253 views

Official Description UNC (Universal Naming Convention)

Can anybody point to a man page or specification that defines the Universal Naming Convention (UNC)? I'm looking for the original source of the idea
0
votes
2answers
609 views

Home directory vs Working directory

In unix like systems what is the difference between a home directory and working directory ?
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Is 'device' synonymous with 'drive' in Unix-like OS's?

In Unix/Linux terminology, are the words 'device' and 'drive' synonymous?
2
votes
1answer
495 views

What should look for in log files if I think limited memory or disk space is causing a crash?

Troubleshooting /var/log files for a recent series of crashes, what should I look for in the files if I believe low memory or disk space are to blame? Is there a general term used in the Linux ...
1
vote
3answers
176 views

Why FreeBsd is using man word for various functions?

Ok, I'm a newbie in FreeBsd and for your info I only know MS windows before this. I wonder why FreeBsd love to use man in various places, for example: FreeBsd Man Pages - This interface will allow ...
1
vote
2answers
414 views

Computer terminal and virtual console [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the exact difference between a 'terminal', a 'shell', a 'tty' and a 'console'? I was wondering what relations and differences ...
16
votes
2answers
2k views

What is a socket?

Could someone explain to me what a socket is? I see it in many acronyms in context of SSL, etc. Also, why is it called a socket? Is it purely because it was what a name they invented? Or was it the ...
9
votes
6answers
792 views

Why was the word “shell” used to descibe a command-line interface?

I'm curious about the term "shell." I think I know what it is (though the distinction between "shell" and "terminal" is still fuzzy) but why was the word "shell" chosen to describe this type of ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the referent of a file descriptor?

My understanding is that a file descriptor is an integer which is a key in the kernel's per-process mapping to objects such as open()ed files, pipes, sockets, etc. Is there a proper, short, and ...
27
votes
5answers
5k views

Why do /usr and /tmp directories for Linux miss vowels in their spellings?

I have often started to think about this but never found a good answer. Why are these two Unix directories not /user and /temp instead? All the other directories under root seem to be exactly what ...
12
votes
6answers
898 views

What does the name of the unix command apropos mean?

Apropos is a tool to search the headers of the man pages for a string. What does the name apropos mean?
6
votes
1answer
767 views

What does 'uni' mean in unistd.h

What does uni mean in unistd.h Does it mean unix? or universal? What is it?
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Expansion of the word UNIX?

Is UNIX an acronym? What does it stand for?
33
votes
7answers
15k views

What does etc stand for?

What does the "etc" folder in the root directory stand for? I think knowing this will help me remember where certain files are located. Update: Might be useful for others, the folder is used for ...
5
votes
1answer
410 views

As we call `#!/bin/perl` 'shebang', what we call `-*- perl -*-`?

The first line of a script may be in format of #! interpreter, so the shell will execute the script using the specific interpreter. This is so called shebang or shbang. Similarly, there can be some ...
39
votes
5answers
28k views

What is a Superblock, Inode, Dentry and a File?

From the article Anatomy of Linux File Systems by Tim Jones, I read that Linux views all the file systems from the perspective of a common set of objects and these objects are superblock, inode, ...
2
votes
2answers
318 views

Where is 'kernel panic' used?

Is the name kernel panic being used outside of Linux-based systems?
22
votes
2answers
5k views

What is the difference between a job and a process?

What is the difference between a "job" and a "process"?
6
votes
1answer
503 views

Difference between references of Linux “utilities”, “commands” and “programs”

I read uses of the word "utilities" for commands/programs such as 'ls', 'chmod', 'mv', etc. Is "commands" is Linux referring to the same things as top, ps, etc., or are those something different? ...
36
votes
5answers
3k views

Why is there a * When There is Mention of Unix Throughout the Internet?

I've noticed that throughout the Internet, within forums and blog posts, Unix always has a * in the word, whether it is *nix or Un*x, as I noticed at the welcoming banner at the Unix StackExchange ...