A special type of file that references an inexistent or existing file or directory. The contents of a symbolic link consist of an arbitrary string that is the path to the file that the symbolic link points to. When the symlink is encountered during pathname resolution, the string stored by the file ...

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

9
votes
1answer
146 views

Strategies for maintaining a reference to a file after it was moved or renamed?

I've had a mac at work lately, and was amazed to see that Xcode would still find my latest project after I renamed its folder and moved it someplace else. Now I understand that this is the result of ...
7
votes
1answer
7k views

Copy symlink AND where it points to using rsync

It doesn't need to be done by rsync, but it would be nice not have to write a script to do this, and rsync is very close to what I want. "rsync -a" (or -l) can preserve symlinks, and -L can ...
17
votes
2answers
13k views

Do symbolic links actually make a difference in disk usage?

I've read in so many websites that, in Linux, symbolic links (soft links, symlinks) are just like pointers that reference another file, which may be located anywhere (like Windows shortcuts). However, ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Keep tracking of symbolic links?

I use symbolic links quite often, but after moving the original file, I lose track of the symbolic link. I also use symbolic links for keeping track of some files in the same directory, but again, I ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a standard symbolic link to the current users home directory?

The shell can expand ~ to your home directory. $HOME usually has the same deal, but often you want to refer to the current users home directory from a context that may not support such expansion. I ...
4
votes
4answers
478 views

Symbolic link and hard link questions

Let's say /A/B/c.sh is symbolic linked to /X/Y/c.sh. If c.sh has the command "./SOMETHING", '.' means /A/B/ or /X/Y/? How about the hard link?