9
votes
2answers
145 views
+100

On system memory… specifically the difference between `tmpfs,` `shm,` and `hugepages…`

I've been curious lately about the various Linux kernel memory based filesystems. Note: As far as I'm concerned, the questions below should be considered more or less optional when compared with a ...
1
vote
2answers
207 views

Hugepages in linux - how to make sure that java process will start using hugepages

I'm running java server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 5.9. Recently I started to use HugePages as it has some advantages I would like to use. System was configured correctly (as many ...
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Permission in shmget Linux

I've been searching about 0666 permission in shmget(). I know that 0666 permission will grant read & write permission on the shared memory segment. But, how do I prove it have permission if I ...
3
votes
1answer
488 views

operation in /dev/shm causes overflow

I am repeating tens of thousands of similar operations in /dev/shm, each with a directory created, files written, and then removed. My assumption used to be that I was actually creating directories ...
1
vote
0answers
70 views

Viewing shared segments created by shmget

I'm trying to "visualize" shared memory between two processes. I've created a little server-client example where the client writes some data to a shared memory location and the server reads from it. ...
5
votes
1answer
810 views

What is “SYSV00000000”?

In my dmesg this appeared when my window manager (xfwm4, part of XFCE) crashed: xfwm4[3936]: segfault at 7f3c7c523770 ip 00007f3c7c523770 sp 00007ffffea1ee28 error 15 in SYSV00000000 ...
4
votes
1answer
781 views

Linux - why is kernel.shmall so low by default?

I run DB2 on Linux where I have to allocate the vast majority of memory on the machine to shared memory segments. This page is typical of the info that I've found about shmall/shmmax: ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

What are shmpages in laymans terms?

What exactly are shmpages in the grand scheme of kernel and memory terminology. If I'm hitting a shmpages limit, what does that mean? I'm also curious if this applies to more than linux