Questions about the command line and other Unix-like aspects of Mac OS X, including the Mach/BSD-based kernel and FreeBSD-based userland. You may want to consider using Ask Different instead.

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18
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5answers
2k views

What is the architecture of Mac OS X's windowing system?

I am familiar with how the X11 system works, where clients connect via a socket to the server process and send operations to the window server to perform certain operations on their behalf. But I do ...
5
votes
3answers
521 views

Any tips for surviving Terminal.app?

I've recently switched to using a Mac full-time, and am having trouble getting used to Terminal.app after years of loving gnome-terminal. I miss having URLs show up underlined, using alt+arrow to ...
9
votes
5answers
1k views

Using text from previous commands' output

I know this is not how terminals work, but I find myself often wishing there was an easy way of using text (copying it, modifying it, etc) that is already on my terminal window history from some ...
14
votes
8answers
8k views

pgrep and pkill alternatives on mac os x?

Are there alternatives to pgrep and pkill commands on Mac OS X or should I just create aliases for them using other commands available for me?
5
votes
1answer
449 views

Explain to a Linux user how do BSD/OSX drivers work

Linux drivers come in a form of kernel modules (*.ko files), which can be given parameters when loaded into the kernel and usually live in /lib/modules/<kernel version>. What's the similar ...
10
votes
9answers
2k views

What features does Darwin have that other Unixes don't, or vice versa?

Does Darwin have any features that are specific to it? Do other Unixe(s) have features that Darwin lacks?
20
votes
6answers
10k views

How do you create a user with no password?

In os X it's possible to have users without passwords. If you inspect them with dscl their password show up as *. This is used for system users such as users for databases like mysql, pgsql etc. ...
23
votes
6answers
5k views

what does the @ mean in ls -l?

I am using Mac OSX. When I type ls -l I see something like drwxr-xr-x@ 12 xonic staff 408 22 Jun 19:00 . drwxr-xr-x 9 xonic staff 306 22 Jun 19:42 .. -rwxrwxrwx@ 1 xonic staff 6148 25 ...