A hard link is file system entry that associates a name with another file on a file system.

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What is the difference between symbolic and hard links?

When would you use one over the other?
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3answers
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Is there a limit of hardlinks for one file?

Is there a limit of number of hardlinks for one file? Is it specified anywhere? What are safe limits for Linux? And what for other POSIX systems?
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5answers
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Can I determine the number of sub-directories in a directory using `ls -l`?

When displaying directories using ls -l, their number of links (the second field in the output) is at least two: one for the dir name and one for . $ mkdir foo $ ls -l total 2 drwxr-xr-x 2 user ...
9
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4answers
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filesystem for archiving

I have some complex read-only data in my file system. It contains thousands of snapshots of certain revisions of a svn repository, and the output of regression tests. Identical files between snapshots ...
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2answers
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Keep tracking of symbolic links?

I use symbolic links quite often, but after moving the original file, I lose track of the symbolic link. I also use symbolic links for keeping track of some files in the same directory, but again, I ...
4
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4answers
493 views

Symbolic link and hard link questions

Let's say /A/B/c.sh is symbolic linked to /X/Y/c.sh. If c.sh has the command "./SOMETHING", '.' means /A/B/ or /X/Y/? How about the hard link?