0
votes
1answer
46 views

Explain the “@” symbol in this permissions example [duplicate]

I have a file on my Darwin system and the permissions are: -rwxr-xr-x@ User: read, write, execute Group: read, execute Other: read, execute What is the 11th notation the @ mean? In addition to ...
3
votes
1answer
86 views

What is chmod 6050 good for

Recently I came across to command: chmod -R 6050 /usr/lib/hadoop-yarn/bin/container-executor I don't know what that mean? I know file permissions like 777 etc. in a mode rwx for owner group others. ...
3
votes
4answers
397 views

permissions 755 on /home/<user>/

I am wondering why by default my directory /home/<user>/ has permissions set to 755. This allows other users to enter into directories and read files in my home. Is there any legitimate reason ...
3
votes
3answers
658 views

How can I revert a chmod on the etc directory?

I accidentally executed the following command on the etc directory: sudo chmod -R 700 /etc I know that I have done something very wrong. My terminal now prints: I have no name!@ubuntu: /$ How ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

How to create a folder which will change its contents’ ownership to what the folder has?

In a GNU/Linux OS there is no way to change ownership of a file until you are root. But what if I want to hide my system’s username e.g. before sending a file to someone, because some things like tar ...
2
votes
4answers
6k views

How to permanently change the file/directory permission [closed]

How do I change the permission of file/directories such that I am able to create, edit, delete files/directories anywhere in my system? Currently I am using Ubuntu 12.04. I tried sudo chmod 777 -r ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

Giving PHP permission to write to files and folders

UPDATED FOR FURTHER CLARITY: According to http://expressionengine.com/user_guide/installation/installation.html, it says: For most Unix hosts the following is typical, but you may check with your ...
5
votes
3answers
2k views

Write access without read access

Is it possible for a user to have a write access to a file and not be able to read it? How is it possible? I tried the following commands: debianbox@debian:~/posix/io$ touch filetest ...
13
votes
3answers
2k views

I accidentally chmod -R +x on a directory. How do I restore the correct permissions?

Well, to be specific, it was chmod -R 755. Now every file is executable, which I don't want. I am thinking that I should look at the first two bytes of each file for the #!, but will this cover ...