chmod is used to change the commonly used read, write, and execute permissions on files. It can change these permission bits for the file owner, the file's group owner, and everyone else. It can also change the more esoteric ‘permissions’ (attributes, reall) like set-user-ID, set-group-ID, and ...

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7
votes
2answers
3k views

recursively change file permission but not directories?

I was doing a mass recursive change of permissions of some files that I had migrated to a unix system. I changed them to ug+rw, but then I found that I could not traverse subdirectories. I looked at ...
3
votes
1answer
408 views

Vanishing permission on device file (RHEL 6.1)

I want to set world read/write permissions on a raw block device file (yeah, I know). I can set the permission to 666, but it goes back to 660 immediately after I touch it or write to it. Why? ...
1
vote
1answer
179 views

Do we need to chmod a shell script before it can be rsh

I tried to rsh a shell script from OpenVms to a Red Hat linux. It seems that it is not executed. I created the shell script in OpenVms and Ftp it to the linux. I then ls -la the folder in linux: ...
8
votes
3answers
23k views

Recursive chmod only folders or only files via script or nautilus menu?

This has been discussed before here. What I'd like to know is how to turn these: Recursive chmod only files within this folder: find . -type f -exec chmod 0600 {} \; Recursive chmod only folders ...
16
votes
4answers
6k views

Wrongly set chmod / 777. Problems?

I was trying to run chmod -R 777 ./ but ended up typing chmod -R 777 / and set 777 on my entire machine. What can go wrong? How can I fix it?
4
votes
2answers
812 views

Directory special permission problem

When I write: chmod g=rws,u=rwx,o=rx folder_name I get: drwxrwSr-x But S is not the same as s, right?
1
vote
1answer
884 views

Temporary Permissions when installing DokuWiki?

I'm trying to upgrade to the latest version of DokuWiki, and I'm finding that the easiest way to do this is to install the upgrade plugin and just click a few buttons. But there are permissions ...
7
votes
1answer
4k views

Is NTFS under linux able to save a linux file, with its chown and chmod settings?

I'm having some doubts about how to install and allow linux to correctly read/write to a NTFS formated harddrive used as backup of various machines (windows included, that's how I need NTFS). For now ...
15
votes
6answers
8k views

Is there a web based converter between rwx and the octal version?

I can never remember what the conversion is from something like rw-r--r-- to 644. Is there a simple web based converter between the 2?
18
votes
1answer
7k views

What is the first chmod octal digit in a four-digit value for?

Sometimes I see chmod commands that use four octal digits instead of three -- what is the optional first digit for? For example, chmod 777 is equivalent to chmod a+rwx; what's the same command for ...
16
votes
2answers
3k views

How to apply recursively chmod directories without affecting files?

After I apply chmod -R to a directory, permissions are changed for everything within (files and directories). How can I add execute/search (x) permissions to directories without modifying the files?
5
votes
3answers
494 views

Unix users, groups, and permissions

I don't understand unix users, groups, permissions, etc. For example, things managed by the chmod, chgrp, usermod, groupadd, etc. commands. How do all these things work?
7
votes
2answers
789 views

How are file permissions calculated?

Using chmod I could set the permissions for a file, but if the parent ( .. ) directory had conflicting permissions, what would happen? And if I create a new file, using touch or something similiar, ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

recursively chmod

I was trying to chmod folders and files with: find . -type d -exec chmod 755 {} \; find . -type f -exec chmod 644 {} \; But I was wondering: How to do it in one line using find and excluding the ...
14
votes
3answers
3k views

I accidentally chmod -R +x on a directory. How do I restore the correct permissions?

Well, to be specific, it was chmod -R 755. Now every file is executable, which I don't want. I am thinking that I should look at the first two bytes of each file for the #!, but will this cover ...