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I have a 160GB hard drive here with an LVM2 partition that contains two EXT3 partitions that I'm trying to mount.

However, when I try to mount either of those two partitions inside the LVM2, I get the error:

mount: wrong fs type, bad option, bad superblock on /dev/loop0,
       missing codepage or helper program, or other error
       In some cases useful info is found in syslog - try
       dmesg | tail  or so

Also, when I run fdisk, it shows the two partitions as not containing "a valid partition table"

Disk /dev/sdd: 160.0 GB, 16004188696 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders, total 312581808 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x0002d815

Device      Boot    Start       End     Blocks      Id  System
/dev/sdd1   *   63      305234      152586      83  Linux
/dev/sdd2       305235      4498199     2096482+    82  Linux swap / Solaris
/dev/sdd3       4498200     312576704   154039252+  8e  Linux LVM

Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-lv_root: 21.5 GB, 21474836480 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 2610 cylindars, total 41943040
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-lv_root doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-lv_usr2: 136.2 GB, 136197439488 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 16558 cylindars, total 266010624 sectors
Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00000000

Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-lv_usr2 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Here are the contents of lvdisplay:

  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Name                /dev/VolGroup00/lv_root
  VG Name                VolGroup00
  LV UUID                jOeBez-2QxJ-Rwth-ufsK-kohE-dHrW-XwDeEi
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Status              available
  # open                 0
  LV Size                20.00 GiB
  Current LE             640
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           252:0

  --- Logical volume ---
  LV Name                /dev/VolGroup00/lv_usr2
  VG Name                VolGroup00
  LV UUID                YvbvFJ-yq2t-gSoV-6CqL-Imby-qx6E-uNu3Iz
  LV Write Access        read/write
  LV Status              available
  # open                 0
  LV Size                126.84 GiB
  Current LE             4059
  Segments               1
  Allocation             inherit
  Read ahead sectors     auto
  - currently set to     256
  Block device           252:1

Do you guys have any advice? I am positive they are ext3 partitions..

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closed as unclear what you're asking by psusi, Anthon, rahmu, jasonwryan, slm Oct 4 '13 at 18:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What is the command you're using to try to mount the volumes? –  John Oct 4 '13 at 12:48
1  
Your mount command output shows you're trying to mount /dev/loop0, not one of your lvm volumes (/dev/VolGroup00/lv_usr2 or /dev/VolGroup00/lv_root). Also lvm volumes don't contain partition tables, so that fdisk output is expected. Use blkid if you want to get a list of identifiable volumes. –  Patrick Oct 4 '13 at 12:49
    
@Patrick, strickly speaking, nothing's stopping you from putting MBR or GPT, BSD disklabel... partitions on a logical volume (and typically virtual machines that have their virtual disk on a LV on the host will have some of those), but the kernel does not expose those partitions automatically as block devices (nothing's stopping a user space program from creating more mapper devices for them though) –  Stéphane Chazelas Oct 4 '13 at 12:56
    
@StephaneChazelas Yes, that is correct. An LVM volume is a block device, just like a physical drive. Anything you put on one can go on the other. However, putting a partition table on a LVM volume is not a common practice, and I would go as far as to say that is almost never done. Also why I said "don't contain", and not "can't contain" :-) –  Patrick Oct 4 '13 at 13:45
    
@Patrick, I agree it's no help to the OP and it's nitpicking, but as I said, it's common to have VM disk images on LVs, so it's common to have partitions (all sorts of partitions even LVM themselves) on LVs. –  Stéphane Chazelas Oct 4 '13 at 13:59

1 Answer 1

When dealing with ext2/ext3 formatted logical volumes it's been my experience that you don't need to provide the filesystem type to mount.

Given your output from lvdisplay you should be mounting one of 2 logical volumes like this:

 $ mount /dev/VolGroup00/lv_root /mnt
 -or-
 $ mount /dev/VolGroup00/lv_usr2 /mnt

If something is wrong with either, you can use the command lvscan to make sure they're active.

Example

$ lvscan
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00' [228.53 GB] inherit
  ACTIVE            '/dev/VolGroup00/LogVol01' [1.94 GB] inherit
  inactive          '/dev/kodak_vg/lvm0' [149.00 GB] inherit
  ACTIVE            '/dev/lvm-raid2/lvm0' [2.73 TB] inherit

If it isn't active you can set it with vgchange.

Example

$ vgchange -ay
  2 logical volume(s) in volume group "VolGroup00" now active
  1 logical volume(s) in volume group "kodak_vg" now active
  1 logical volume(s) in volume group "lvm-raid2" now active

Which will set them all back to active.

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