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I just replaced SSDs

There are 4 hard disk

Disk /dev/sda: 240.1 GB, 240057409536 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 29185 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xc4521435

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1               1       29185   234428481   83  Linux

Disk /dev/sdb: 240.1 GB, 240057409536 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 29185 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0xc8c906e0

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1               1       29185   234428481   83  Linux

Disk /dev/sdd: 120.0 GB, 120034123776 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 14593 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x00061c96

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdd1   *           1          14      103424   83  Linux
Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sdd2              14         536     4194304   82  Linux swap / Solaris
Partition 2 does not end on cylinder boundary.
/dev/sdd3             536       14594   112921600   83  Linux

Disk /dev/sdc: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disk identifier: 0x4fa82c2a

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdc1               1       30401   244196001   83  Linux
root@host [/home]#

But if I type df, only one shows up. This could be problematic. Should I open a new ticket for this?

root@host [/home]# df
Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/sdd3            111148848  28170020  77332748  27% /
/usr/tmpDSK            1006872     18208    937516   2% /tmp
tmpfs                  7990772         0   7990772   0% /dev/shm
share|improve this question
1  
df - report file system disk space usage, file system != disk drive; in order to obtain the file system, you have to mount a partition from a disk drive with a specific file system type; only when it knows the file system type it will be able to determine it is usage. If I hand you a closed box but I don't give you the key to open it; how will you be able tell how full the box is, given that you know nothing about the box or its contents? –  Tom Wijsman Sep 29 '13 at 1:58
    
You said: "I already mounted those disks in fstab". So show us the contents of /etc/fstab and the output of mount. –  msw Sep 29 '13 at 13:04

1 Answer 1

It's the only one mounted (?) It's not clear from the question why you expect there to be more than one - disks don't automount themselves, it looks like you installed on SDD (which seems to contain a /boot sized partition and your main FS with swap).

You can try mkdir /mnt/temp then mount /dev/sdc1 /mnt/temp and retry your df command, see if it gives you more joy.

Your /etc/fstab is the 'go to' for what the system is expecting to mount, and where.

share|improve this answer
    
I already mounted those disks in fstab –  Jim Thio Sep 29 '13 at 3:11
    
With the auto parameter? Does it mount and work if you do it by hand? You're leaving out a lot of relevant diagnostic information, you didn't mention the all important fstab originally. It's unlikely this has anything to do specifically with Solid State Drives either, they're there, they show up and work (reading the partition table counts as at least partially working), this seems to be more a "unixey" question than anything related even to drive tech, yet alone SSD tech specifically. –  iain Sep 29 '13 at 18:06
    
Another reboot and the drives are all mounted. Not sure what happened before. –  Jim Thio Sep 30 '13 at 7:07

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