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I'm running a very large, memory intensive program on my new UNIX server and trying to fully understand the output of the "top" command. Here is what I see right now (showing only the first process):

load averages:  1.51,  1.48,  1.45;               up 59+12:23:36                              08:57:47
194 processes: 191 sleeping, 1 zombie, 2 on cpu
CPU states: 99.5% idle,  0.4% user,  0.1% kernel,  0.0% iowait,  0.0% swap
Kernel: 2045 ctxsw, 73 trap, 2891 intr, 1797 syscall, 23 flt, 48 pgout
Memory: 256G phys mem, 214G free mem, 22G total swap, 22G free swap

   PID USERNAME LWP PRI NICE  SIZE   RES STATE    TIME    CPU COMMAND
 15382 bd9439    22   1    4 7799M 7787M cpu/147  21.9H  0.39% sas

What is the meaning of the number in the "STATE" column following "cpu" (in this case 147)? The man page only says:

 STATE
      Current state (typically one of "sleep", "run",  "idl",
      "zomb", or "stop").

This is a new Oracle T4-4 server running Solaris 10 not yet in "production", meaning this is the only thing running right now.

Solaris 10 and top version 3.7:

bd9439@bsprd697 $ uname -a
SunOS bsprd697 5.10 Generic_148888-01 sun4v sparc sun4v
bd9439@bsprd697 $ top --version
top: version 3.7
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What version of solaris and top are we talking here? top --version. –  slm Sep 26 '13 at 14:52
    
@slm I added info to the question, thanks. –  BellevueBob Sep 26 '13 at 14:57
    
Is it just this row that shows it this way or all of them, or some of them? –  slm Sep 26 '13 at 15:07
    
Did you accidentally hit either the t or H keys? Look through this man page: unixtop.org/man.shtml. There are sections for Solaris that might be tripping you up. –  slm Sep 26 '13 at 15:12
    
@slm Thanks for the link; that man page does describe the meaning of that number after the slash (as answered below). It's not in the man page on my system. –  BellevueBob Sep 26 '13 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The number refers to the ID# of the logical CPU that the process is running on.

References

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Yep, that's it. The link to the man page provided by slm in a comment has a complete description. –  BellevueBob Sep 26 '13 at 18:10

STATE = the state of the process (this is taken from prstat command man page):

  • cpuN - Process is running on CPU N.

  • sleep - Sleeping: process is waiting for an event to complete.

  • wait -Waiting: process is waiting for CPU usage to drop to the CPU-caps enforced limits. See the description of CPU-caps in resource_controls(5).

  • run - Runnable: process in on run queue.

  • zombie - Zombie state: process terminated and parent not waiting.

  • stop - Process is stopped.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but I'm asking about the number following the word "cpu" in the report, in this case cpu/147. I don't know what the 147 means. –  BellevueBob Sep 26 '13 at 15:02
1  
Yo have 4 T4 processors, each with 8 cores and each can handle 8 threads, so in total 256 logical thread units where 147 is one of them. –  dsmsk80 Sep 26 '13 at 18:21

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