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I just installed RHEL 6.3 on a Dell 1950 server. This server as two GBit ports, Gb0 and Gb1.

For some obscure reason, udev chose to name Gb0 eth1 and Gb1 eth0. This is definitly not a good find for me and just gives confusion.

So I modified the configuration in /etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules:

# PCI device 0x14e4:0x164c (bnx2)
SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", DRIVERS=="?*", \
  ATTR{address}=="00:20:19:52:d3:c0",           \
  ATTR{type}=="1", KERNEL=="eth*", NAME="eth1"

# PCI device 0x14e4:0x164c (bnx2)
SUBSYSTEM=="net", ACTION=="add", DRIVERS=="?*", \
  ATTR{address}=="00:20:19:52:d3:be",           \
  ATTR{type}=="1", KERNEL=="eth*", NAME="eth0"

I just changed the "NAME" field on the file in order to reflect what I want. I rebooted the server and it didn't worked.

In the dmesg log I can read the following :

udev: renamed network interface eth1 to rename5
udev: renamed network interface eth0 to eth1
udev: renamed network interface rename5 to eth0

Any idea on what is wrong here? Why is udev switching like this? I have another similar server, where I do not have this issue.

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so what is the assignment now? still Gb0==eth1 & Gb1==eth0? –  umläute Sep 17 '13 at 17:10
    
once check grep -R 'rename5' /etc/udev/rules.d/ because in logs why it is showing rename5 is any other rule for the same ? –  Rahul Patil Sep 18 '13 at 3:03
    
I've done similar thing for network interfaces and it shows just like that in the log (if you follow the logic in it, it just assigns a bogus name to original eth1 so that it can rename original eth0 to eth1). So according to the log everything should be ok. Are you sure the names are not ok yet? –  zagrimsan Sep 18 '13 at 7:09
    
The assignment is still wrong : Gb0==eth1 & Gb1==eth0. Its like the changes I made in the file are not applied. I don't have any trace of rename5 in /etc/udev/rules.d/. What I understand is when kernel boot eth0 and eth1 are boot but udev switch them. eth0 => eth1 and eth1 => eth0 –  Hugo Sep 18 '13 at 8:18
    
Have you found a solution? I am struggling with this problem too. On normal boot, I end up with p1p1 and p1p2. But since I have plugged a network cable on p1p2, on some boot (not all, which is weird), I end up with p1p1 and rename3!?!? Udev is renaming eth1 to rename3 instead of p1p2 for whatever reason. This of course break the network i/f configuration and firewall X-( Not that I am on Ubuntu –  Huygens Apr 5 at 22:09

1 Answer 1

have you tried creating a blank /etc/udev/rules.d/80-net-name-slot.rules ?

since Udev v197, udev has implemented predictable network interface names, by creating a blank file in that path then rebooting, you should have your interface names back to what they were.

i answered a similar question at : Creating eth0 with consistent network device naming

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