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EXT3-fs (sdd1): using internal journal
EXT3-fs (sdd1): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode
EXT4-fs (sda1): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: 
EXT4-fs (sdb1): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: 
EXT4-fs (sdc1): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: 
Adding 4194296k swap on /dev/sdd2.  Priority:-1 extents:1 across:4194296k SSD
kjournald starting.  Commit interval 5 seconds
EXT3-fs (loop0): warning: maximal mount count reached, running e2fsck is recommended
EXT3-fs (loop0): using internal journal
EXT3-fs (loop0): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode

(loop0) is mounted too many times. What is it? Is it important?

This is my fstab

#
# /etc/fstab
# Created by anaconda on Wed Nov  1 00:29:46 2000
#
# Accessible filesystems, by reference, are maintained under '/dev/disk'
# See man pages fstab(5), findfs(8), mount(8) and/or blkid(8) for more info
#
UUID=9fac7ae7-9948-4612-88dc-e652fc4ceb73 /                       ext4    defaults        1 1
UUID=1daa52c7-a5da-464d-a4c7-2ee19ef017af /boot                   ext3    defaults        1 2
UUID=12649fb1-fd53-4558-8a2a-79692ada8b19 swap                    swap    defaults        0 0
tmpfs                   /dev/shm                tmpfs   defaults        0 0
devpts                  /dev/pts                devpts  gid=5,mode=620  0 0
sysfs                   /sys                    sysfs   defaults        0 0
proc                    /proc                   proc    defaults        0 0
/usr/tmpDSK             /tmp                    ext3    defaults,noauto        0 0
/dev/sda1               /home1                  auto    auto,noatime,defaults        0 2
/dev/sdb1               /home2                  auto    auto,noatime,defaults        0 2
/dev/sdc1               /home3                  auto    auto,noatime,defaults        0 2
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what is your /etc/mtab? –  johnshen64 Aug 21 '13 at 3:17
    
i can't be bothered to make an actual answer, but loop0 is a loopback device (google it); it basically "loops" back to somewhere on another device (e.g. a file on a /dev/sdAX.). you can e2fsck it the same way you would e.g. /dev/sda1: e2fsck /dev/loop0. –  strugee Aug 21 '13 at 3:45
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2 Answers

I think you may be misinterpreting the message "maximal mount count reached". Filesytems of the ext? family have a clean-bit which is set on orderly shutdown so that the filesystem doesn't have to be checked on boot if marked "clean".

However, its a good idea to check it every 30(?) mounts or so even if the clean-bit has been set each time, in case it isn't actually clean. From your fstab, /usr/tmpDSK looks like a drive image (which uses loop? for mounting). I'd fsck that file first. If that's the complaining mount, it will stop complaining after fsck passes.

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loop is handy when you want perform actions that require to do things such as mount an iso to a file system.

mount myiso.iso /mnt/iso/ -t iso9660 -o ro,loop=/dev/loop0
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