Take the 2-minute tour ×
Unix & Linux Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm sorry I know this is not the place but I'm kinda dead in the water here. So I'm completely new to Linux an I wanted to install Fedora 19 with my Windows 7 (dual boot) but when I go through the installation process it only shows my harddrive (not partitions) and says that there is 37 gig available for u an 17 mb available for us and says that there is not enough space on my hard drive. I have a 500 gig hard drive and three ntfs partitions with a LOT of free space should i resize one partition and leave the free space unallocated and then try to install fedora?

share|improve this question
    
resize one partition, you don't install linux on windows filesystem ( unless under a vm AFAIK ). –  BitsOfNix Jul 16 '13 at 8:11
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You must have unallocated space on your hard drive in which to install Fedora. Also keep in mind the 4 primary or 3 primary + 1 extended partition limit for drives using the legacy partition scheme, since you say you already have 3 partitions on your disk.

share|improve this answer
    
tnx that was real helpful just one more questions how can i know that how many partitions are supported in my legacy partition scheme i have an asus n43jq laptop i googled it but i didn't find anything –  Ashkan Jul 16 '13 at 8:30
    
and another question can't i convert one of my partitions to fat32 and then try to install it on that one leaving the rest of hard untouched? –  Ashkan Jul 16 '13 at 8:31
    
Both of those are answered in my answer. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 16 '13 at 8:54
    
so in my situation (having 3 partitions) there shouldn't be any problems should be? sry im just nervous about my hard i can't afford buying a new one –  Ashkan Jul 16 '13 at 9:09
    
Are they all primary partitions? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 16 '13 at 9:10
show 12 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.