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My hardware clock is set to local time (GMT +2) and my fresh Arch installation apparently thinks that it is not, so it adds 3 hours to it. I've fiddled with hwclock and timedatectl without hope. I'm hesitant to touch time settings in BIOS. How can I fix this?

Below is the output from timedatectl:

      Local time: Sun 2013-06-23 06:44:12 EEST
  Universal time: Sun 2013-06-23 03:44:12 UTC
        Timezone: Europe/Istanbul (EEST, +0300)
     NTP enabled: n/a
NTP synchronized: no
 RTC in local TZ: yes
      DST active: yes
 Last DST change: DST began at
                  Sun 2013-03-31 02:59:59 EET
                  Sun 2013-03-31 04:00:00 EEST
 Next DST change: DST ends (the clock jumps one hour backwards) at
                  Sun 2013-10-27 03:59:59 EEST
                  Sun 2013-10-27 03:00:00 EET

Warning: The RTC is configured to maintain time in the local time zone. This
         mode is not fully supported and will create various problems with time
         zone changes and daylight saving adjustments. If at all possible use
         RTC in UTC, by calling 'timedatectl set-local-rtc 0'.
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Have you read the documentation on the Arch wiki?

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Time

The hardware clock can be queried and set with the timedatectl command. To change the hardware clock time standard to localtime use:

# timedatectl set-local-rtc 1

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Yes I have, and I did try it again now, no effect. –  cadadr Jun 22 '13 at 22:39
    
Could you provide the output of timedatectl before and after timedatectl set-local-rtc 1? –  David Baggerman Jun 23 '13 at 0:02
    
RTC in local TZ: yes after that command; was no before. I recall doing this and rebooting a couple of times today. –  cadadr Jun 23 '13 at 0:19
    
I'm more interested in the Local / Universal / RTC times. It might also be worth checking hwclock -r --localtime to verify that your hardware clock hasn't been reset to UTC. I'm also assuming that your timezone has been set correctly in the new installation. –  David Baggerman Jun 23 '13 at 0:29
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Also, remember that while localtime isn't going anywhere anytime soon, it isn't supported. At least according to the wiki, IIRC. –  strugee Jun 23 '13 at 3:52
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