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I'm curious to see if there are any plugins that create a menu inside vim (not gVim). Perhaps something simple like a menu bar at the top, with drop down menus that are drawn with text.

EDIT: The focus here is a menu system that behaves like the menu system in gVim, but inside console vim. So in other words, a drop down menu system that you can click on, and submenus (if any) open to the right in a new drop down.

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emacs does this by default. –  jordanm Apr 6 '13 at 4:24
    
@jordanm How is that relevant here? –  Herman Torjussen Apr 6 '13 at 12:16
    
@jordanm Not really, emacs by default does not have drop down menus. The menus appear at the bottom in a non-dropdown listed manner that does not resemble a GUI at all. –  trusktr Apr 9 '13 at 0:56
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duplicate of unix.stackexchange.com/questions/43526/… –  msw Aug 21 '13 at 21:03
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1 Answer

You can use the :emenu command (with <Tab> to complete) to access the defined menu items from the command line.

If you want to access plugin functionality, there usually are also mappings or custom commands. Using or trying to emulate a traditional menu is frowned upon in console Vim.

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It may be frowned upon to have menus in vim, but a good menu system would help people learn by showing the exact keystrokes required next to each menu item, I believe. Just like how in gVim it shows you the keystrokes; that's helpful in learning vim. Plus, a new user may not be a vim ninja, but at least he has the powers of vim, despite the fact that he uses a GUI menu. You have to admit, although vim has a gui menu system (which you don't have to use), it's still better than having any other text editor, even for users who use the menu. –  trusktr Apr 9 '13 at 1:03
    
The the mere fact that the user is using vim (despite if it has a gui window) allows him/her to start learning jedi programming tricks, unlike other editors with a gui. –  trusktr Apr 9 '13 at 1:03
    
Vim has a good menu system: use GVIM; with its toolbar, context menu, and better highlighting it's more suitable for beginners who might need such "training wheels", anyway. –  Ingo Karkat Apr 9 '13 at 6:31
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