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64-bit if that matters. My mouse sensitivity slider does nothing, but my acceleration slider works. I'd like acceleration off and sensitivity how I like it, but it refuses to work. I have tested the option on two computers, and both do not change the sensitivity. Any help?

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Tried a good ol' relogin? –  schaiba Feb 15 '13 at 17:40
    
What's your hardware? Is this a mouse or a touchpad? Can you adjust the sensitivity using another Desktop Environment? A live session? –  terdon Feb 16 '13 at 0:24
    
A relogin and reboots do not work. I've tried both a USB mouse and touchpad. Both don't work. Not a live session. I'll try a different desktop enviroment later. –  Elliot Yoon Feb 16 '13 at 0:57
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2 Answers

From what I've been able to gather in a short time dealing with this issue is that in Linux/Mac OS X the mouse velocity is mapped 1:1. This means that when you move the mouse one point, the cursor moves one pixel. Depending on how many DPI the mouse have this could be slow/normal/fast for you. The actual 'speed' is controlled via acceleration. Unfortunately it seems that there's no simple solution to disable acceleration and yet increase velocity (having 1:n mapping) like in Windows.

The best solution I could find so far is provided by the user aib on this page: http://superuser.com/questions/259216/disabling-mouse-acceleration-in-x-org-linux.

In short, you set the acceleration profile to limited. This stops further acceleration once it's reached the value threshold which you set to 0. The acceleration value then becomes the velocity of your mouse cursor.

To permanently save this setting you need to edit a config file or create a script that will do that at startup.

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Touchpad has been total crap in Mint. Maybe try gpointing-device-settings If not installed, install it, then type it as seen above in terminal. It wont work like it's supposed to, but that's Mint.

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Exactly what problems do you see? What machine is it? Did you report the problems to your distribution? –  vonbrand Feb 23 '13 at 16:57
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