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How do I move all files in a directory (including the hidden ones) to another directory?

For example, if I have a folder "Foo" with the files ".hidden" and "notHidden" inside, how do I move both files to a directory named "Bar"? The following does not work, as the ".hidden" file stays in "Foo".

mv Foo/* Bar/

Note: Try it yourself.

mkdir Foo
mkdir Bar
touch Foo/.hidden
touch Foo/notHidden
mv Foo/* Bar/
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Bah, I knew I should have refreshed the answers before typing mine up. Very helpful link. –  Steven D Jan 24 '11 at 19:48
    
Sadly, this question ended up here because I said on SO that it should move here or SU, so of course it moved here when there was a duplicate on SU already :) –  Michael Mrozek Jan 24 '11 at 20:06
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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jan 24 '11 at 19:33

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

4 Answers

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Zsh

mv Foo/*(DN) Bar/

or

setopt -s glob_dots
mv Foo/*(N) Bar/

(Leave out the (N) if you know the directory is not empty.)

Bash

shopt -s dotglob nullglob
mv Foo/* Bar/

Ksh93

If you know the directory is not empty:

FIGNORE='.?(.)'
mv Foo/* Bar/

Standard (POSIX) sh

for x in Foo/* Foo/.[!.]* Foo/..?*; do
  if [ -e "$x" ]; then mv -- "$x" Bar/
done

If you're willing to let the mv command return an error status even though it succeeded, it's a lot simpler:

mv Foo/* Foo/.[!.]* Foo/..?* Bar/

GNU find and GNU mv

find Foo/ -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -exec mv -t Bar/ -- {} +

Standard find

If you don't mind changing to the source directory:

cd Foo/ &&
find . -name . -o -exec sh -c 'mv "$@" "$0"' ../Bar/ {} + -type d -prune

Here's more detail about matching controlling whether dot files are matched in bash, ksh93 and zsh.

Bash

Set the dotglob option.

$ echo *
none zero
$ shopt -s dotglob
$ echo *
..two .one none zero

There's also the more flexible GLOBIGNORE variable, which you can set to a colon-separated list of wildcard patterns to ignore. If unset (the default setting), the shell behaves as if the value was empty if dotglob is set, and as if the value was .* if the option is set. See Filename Expansion in the manual. The pervasive directories . and .. are always omitted, unless the . is matched explicitly by the pattern.

$ GLOBIGNORE='n*'
$ echo *
..two .one zero
$ echo .*
.. ..two .one
$ unset GLOBIGNORE
$ echo .*
.. ..two .one
$ GLOBIGNORE=.:..
$ echo .*
..two .one

Ksh93

Set the FIGNORE variable. If unset (the default setting), the shell behaves as if the value was .*. To ignore . and .., they must be matched explicitly (the manual in ksh 93s+ 2008-01-31 states that . and .. are always ignored, but this does not match the actual behavior).

$ echo *
none zero
$ FIGNORE='.|..'
$ echo *
..two .one none zero
$ FIGNORE='n*'
$ echo *
. .. ..two .one zero

You can include dot files in a pattern by matching them explicitly.

$ unset FIGNORE
$ echo @(*|.[^.]*|..?*)
..two .one none zero

To have the expansion come out empty if the directory is empty, use the N pattern matching option: ~(N)@(*|.[^.]*|..?*) or ~(N:*|.[^.]*|..?*).

Zsh

Set the dot_glob option.

% echo *
none zero
% setopt dot_glob
% echo *
..two .one none zero

. and .. are never matched, even if the pattern matches the leading . explicitly.

% echo .*
..two .one

You can include dot files in a specific pattern with the D glob qualifier.

% echo *(D)
..two .one none zero

Add the N glob qualifier to make the expansion come out empty in an empty directory: *(DN).

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Signed up just to upvote you. So much good info here –  TheIronKnuckle Jun 15 '13 at 3:03
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#!/bin/bash

shopt -s dotglob
mv Foo/* Bar/

From man bash

dotglob If set, bash includes filenames beginning with a '.' in the results of pathname expansion.

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With the caveat that this command returns an error code if the directory was empty (even though the command actually performed as intended). –  Gilles Jan 24 '11 at 20:28
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One way is to use find:

find Foo/ -type f -exec mv -t Bar/ {} \+

The -type f restricts the find command to finding files. You should investigate the -type, -maxdepth, and -mindepth options of find to customize your command to account for subdirectories. Find has a lengthy but very helpful manual page.

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2  
That only moves the regular files in Foo/, not subdirectories and other files. –  Gilles Jan 24 '11 at 20:29
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A simple way to do this in bash is

mv {Foo/*,Foo/.*} Bar/

But this will also move directories.

If you want to move all files including hidden but don't want to move any directory you can use a for loop and test.

for i in $(ls -d {Foo/*,Foo/.*});do test -f $i && mv -v $i Bar/; done;

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