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After upgrading to Fedora 18, on certain occasions, gnome-terminal will fail to launch, requiring me to log out of the desktop and log in again. I tried tracing the error and found the following in audit.log:

type=ANOM_ABEND msg=audit(1359986892.064:86): auid=500 uid=500 gid=500 ses=2 subj=unconfined_u:unconfined_r:unconfined_t:s0-s0:c0.c1023 pid=2185 comm="gnome-terminal" reason="memory violation" sig=6

No alert is issued and nothing is recorded in SELinux Troubleshooter. Nothing is found on /var/log/messages either. Is this a bug? What does the above log statement say? How can I proceed to solve this problem?

UPDATE:

Not sure if this is relevant, but I do have some warnings on memory from the kernel upon startup every time:

notice  kern kernel [    0.000000] 1154MB HIGHMEM available.
notice  kern kernel [    0.000000] 883MB LOWMEM available.
info    kern kernel [    0.000000]   mapped low ram: 0 - 373fe000
info    kern kernel [    0.000000]   low ram: 0 - 373fe000
warning kern kernel [    0.000000] Zone ranges:
warning kern kernel [    0.000000]   DMA      [mem 0x00010000-0x00ffffff]
warning kern kernel [    0.000000]   Normal   [mem 0x01000000-0x373fdfff]
warning kern kernel [    0.000000]   HighMem  [mem 0x373fe000-0x7f68ffff]
warning kern kernel [    0.000000] Movable zone start for each node
warning kern kernel [    0.000000] Early memory node ranges
warning kern kernel [    0.000000]   node   0: [mem 0x00010000-0x0009efff]
warning kern kernel [    0.000000]   node   0: [mem 0x00100000-0x7f68ffff]
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What are those certain occasions? Please try to start the application from a terminal and paste the messages you get when it fails to start. –  schaiba Feb 4 '13 at 15:33
    
I'm not sure this is SELinux as it does not happen every time you launch gnome-terminal. One way to be sure is to turn off SELinux (setenforce Permissive) and continue to launch gnome-terminal until it does/does not happen again. To persistently turn off SELinux between reboots, append "enforcing=0" to your kernel boot line in grub. –  uther Feb 4 '13 at 16:01
    
@schaiba, it happens at random. I can't start any application from the gnome terminal since it can't be started. –  Question Overflow Feb 4 '13 at 16:37
    
He is suggesting launching gnome-terminal, or xterm, or some other terminal, and then launch gnome-terminal from the command line of the parent terminal. If and when gnome-terminal fails, you should have some debug output in the parent terminal window. –  uther Feb 4 '13 at 16:40
2  
This is a serious problem, that should be investigated. And SELinux is not to blame, if it was, gnome-terminal would never start. Everything up to date? Does the machine pass a memtest (presumably in your installation media, boot that and leave it running)? Freshly started (cold) machine, or after some use (possible overheating somewhere)? Does anything else crash? What does rpm -V gnome-terminal say (nothing == everything is fine)? –  vonbrand Feb 5 '13 at 15:19

1 Answer 1

Have this problem on fedora 17, latest updates, exact same message in audit.log.

Had this happen a few days ago and again just now, tried repeatedly starting gnome-terminal from gnome menu, awn and alt-f2, audit.log shows the same message, one for each attempt.

Logging out of gnome shell and logging back in fixed the issue.

Pretty sure this isn't due to hardware that went bad, not seeing any other unexplained issues.

So far it seems to happen after previously closing gnome-terminal but I couldn't reproduce it by attempting to repeat the session after a reboot.

Have installed xterm now and will try run gnome-terminal from there if it happens again and report back.

To the OP: those kernel messages are purely informational and do not indicate any problem, they are most likely unrelated.


Edit: Running from xterm after encountering this gave the following output:

$ gnome-terminal
GConf Error: Configuration server couldn't be contacted: D-BUS error: The GConf daemon is currently shutting down.
GConf Error: Configuration server couldn't be contacted: D-BUS error: The GConf daemon is currently shutting down.
GConf Error: Configuration server couldn't be contacted: D-BUS error: The GConf daemon is currently shutting down.
GConf Error: Configuration server couldn't be contacted: D-BUS error: The GConf daemon is currently shutting down.
GConf Error: Configuration server couldn't be contacted: D-BUS error: The GConf daemon is currently shutting down.
GConf Error: Configuration server couldn't be contacted: D-BUS error: The GConf daemon is currently shutting down.
**
ERROR:terminal-app.c:1449:terminal_app_init: assertion failed: (app->default_profile_id != NULL)
Aborted

A quick Google search revealed this related bug report.

I was able to the problem (without having to interrupt my session) by killing

$ killall -5 gconfd-2
$

Gnome will restart gconfd-2 automatically.

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Thanks for the confirmation that it is not hardware related problem. Yes, I agree that those kernel messages are unrelated as they appear on all computers. Not sure whether it is informational as they are classified under warnings. –  Question Overflow Feb 14 '13 at 2:52
    
An anonymous contributor writes: “Out of curiosity I tried to investigate why those kernel messages have the 'warning' loglevel. It appears this is because they do not have a specified severity and are therefor classified as whatever the default kernel loglevel for messages is, which happens to be 'warning' at the moment.” –  Gilles Feb 14 '13 at 21:38

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