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I am setting up my first network at work. All the servers are running CentOS 6.3 and have statically assigned IP addresses.

For example:

server1 192.168.0.101
server2 192.168.0.102

I want to be able to type something at the command line like

$> ssh myuser@server1  

The quickest solution is to edit the hosts file and after some research the preferred way seems to be running a DNS server.

I think both solutions mean that I have to manually edit files but I would like my internal servers to auto-discover over UDP.
I could write something that runs a UDP service and updates the hosts file with new servers as they come online / get removed, but it seems like such a simple thing that it must exist already and I don't want to reinvent (this potentially dangerous) wheel, does anyone know of software that already does this?

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Why not just running DNS, though? –  njsg Jan 27 '13 at 16:00
    
Because editing files makes me sad. –  Will Jan 27 '13 at 16:09
    
DNS just requores having DHCP set up giving machines the address of your own DNS server which requires changing configurations once in the computer that serves DHCP leases, and also in the DNS server (once too) to assign the desired names... –  njsg Jan 27 '13 at 16:43
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1 Answer 1

You could use ZeroConf: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multicast_DNS

Check avahi out: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HowToZeroconf (ubuntu howto, should be easily adaptable to CentOS)

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Please provide more details. This would be considered as 'link only answer'. –  mtk Jan 27 '13 at 16:50
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