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I have been using Ubuntu 12.10 for some time now, and I kinda hate it. 12.04 was a lot better. While i can still revert to 12.04, I am thinking about trying out Linux Mint based on 12.10 (the Nadia version). I have not tried Mint before.

The question I have is, can all 'Ubuntu' based packages be installed in Mint also, without any issues? For example, most of the packages that I download from respective sites list a version for linux like this "Debian/Ubuntu" and then give a .deb file, which is quite easy to install in Ubuntu. If I get such a file, is that relevant to Linux Mint as well?

The general question is, if a package is made for Debian/Ubuntu, will that package be directly installable in Linux Mint as well?

Thanks!

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Yes. Mint is based on Debian/Ubuntu. Your conditions of "without any problems" is a bit specific for such a generic answer, but generally, the answer is 'yes'. –  vgoff Nov 16 '12 at 21:32
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2 Answers

If you use Linux Mint based on an Ubuntu version, then most packages made for that version (and sometime previous or later versions) will work on that version of Mint.

The same goes for packages made for Debian.

The main issue you may run into is if you use a package built for a specific version of Debian or Ubuntu on Linux Mint or Linux Mint Debian Edition (respectively) - that depends on a package not available for that version. This is a rare and unlikely issue, so in most cases you should be just fine.

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Linux Mint comes in two flavours. One is based on Ubuntu, the other one (LMDE) is based on Debian. The Ubuntu based version (the default one) is guaranteed to work with Ubuntu packages and the LMDE is guaranteed to be compatible with packages from the Debian repository.

Installing packages from a different distribution might work in some or many cases, but fail in others. It is not officially supported.

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