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I am trying to install KVM from Installation doc.

When I run the command modprobe kvm-intel I get the error FATAL: Error inserting kvm_intel (/lib/modules/2.6.32-279.5.2.el6.x86_64/kernel/arch/x86/kvm/kvm-intel.ko): Operation not supported.

I also run the cat /proc/cpuinfo and output is as below.

processor       : 0
vendor_id       : GenuineIntel
cpu family      : 6
model           : 42
model name      : Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-2520M CPU @ 2.50GHz
stepping        : 7
cpu MHz         : 2494.420
cache size      : 3072 KB
fpu             : yes
fpu_exception   : yes
cpuid level     : 13
wp              : yes
flags           : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss syscall nx rdtscp lm constant_tsc up arch_perfmon pebs bts xtopology tsc_reliable nonstop_tsc aperfmperf unfair_spinlock pni pclmulqdq ssse3 cx16 sse4_1 sse4_2 popcnt aes xsave avx hypervisor lahf_lm ida arat epb xsaveopt pln pts dts
bogomips        : 4988.84
clflush size    : 64
cache_alignment : 64
address sizes   : 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual
power management:

May be I am missing some command but which I dont know :(.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, your Intel chipset isn't supported. You don't have an Intel VT chipset (no vmx flag in your /proc/cpuinfo), so you can't run KVM on your machine. From the KVM FAQ:

Q: How do I know if my hardware supports KVM?

A: Run the following command:

 
grep -E 'vmx|svm' /proc/cpuinfo
flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat
pse36 clflush dts
acpi mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts
pni monitor ds_cpl vmx
est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr lahf_lm ida
flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat
pse36 clflush dts acpi mmx fxsr
sse sse2 ss ht tm pbe nx lm constant_tsc arch_perfmon pebs bts pni monitor
ds_cpl vmx est tm2 ssse3 cx16 xtpr lahf_lm ida

If this command returns output, then your system supports KVM. The vmx processor feature flag represents Intel VT chipset while the svm flag represents AMD-V.

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1  
He can still virtualize via qemu, but it will be slower. –  jordanm Sep 27 '12 at 15:32
grep -E 'vmx|svm' /proc/cpuinfo.

For Intel cpu is vmx flag.

http://ark.intel.com/products/52229/
Intel indicates your cpu i5-2520M supports vmx. So your bios has this this feature switched off! Just open it in your bios!

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There may be hope yet, some BIOS versions mask the bit when disabling virtualization extensions so it does not appear in procinfo.

I would try to enable VT in the BIOS, then disconnect the power cord (it's a requirement), if it's a laptop you may have to take the battery out and put it back in as well.

Afterwards when you boot, check again. As I said, only some versions do this so you may still fail, but it's worth a try.

Checking your processor model number indicates that it does support VT-d (specs), though the chipset may not support it and make it unavailable.

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1  
+1. also, enabling virtualisation can often be hidden in a really bizarre location in the BIOS (esp. on name-brand PCs like HP). e.g. on a HP dc7800 (with Intel Core2 Quad Q9450 CPU), it was hidden away in "Security Settings" (or something like that, I can't remember the exact text of the menu item). It would never have occurred to me to look in a security menu for virtualisation options, I only found it by exhaustive search of ALL menu items out of desperation. –  cas Sep 28 '12 at 1:35
    
Thanks David for your reply, but checked in BIOS and its virtualisation enabled. I am also running VMware on this. I have HP EliteBook 8460p. I also tried after removing the battery and check grep -E 'vmx|svm' /proc/cpuinfo but output is same :(. –  Lafada Sep 28 '12 at 3:26
    
So you have no choice but to get a new motherboard or use a software virtualization like virtualbox, vmware , zen or qemu. @CraigSanders it is a security feature to avoid a virtualization based rootkit –  David Kohen Oct 2 '12 at 6:00
    
@David: that's like saying the power switch is a security feature to avoid a code-based rootkit. By that reasoning, all features which can be enabled/disabled/configured in the bios belong under the security menu. –  cas Oct 2 '12 at 6:11
    
@CraigSanders, not at all, there are 3 main features that are defined as security in the hardware - Virtualization, NoExecute memory regions, and "beacon" that is active in some Intel CPUs. We're digressing here, you are welcome to post a question about this in the security stackexchange site, you're welcome to tag me so I'd know about it. –  David Kohen Oct 2 '12 at 6:16

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