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I have a shell script (set_up_my_ls_colors.sh) that, if I call from my shell, it configures my color scheme for ls. The nice thing about the script is that it allows me to configure colors in a human-readable format. The file works well under zsh and bash, but it does not work well in tcsh.

If I call it as:

. ~/.set_up_my_ls_colors.sh

I get:

.: Permission denied 

even though the file has u+x permissions.

I have also tried with

/bin/tcsh ~/.set_up_ls_colors.sh

which returns

Illegal variable name

Below is the file set_up_my_ls_colors.sh in question:

# Call this script as . ~/path_to_this_file.sh

export LS_COLORS=$( \
( grep '\w' | grep -v '^#' | sed 's/#.\+//' | perl -lane 'printf "%s=%s:", shift @F, join ";", @F;' ) <<< "

# HUMAN_FORMATTED_DATA
# list one per line

# these are basic filesystem items
no 00          # normal
fi 00          # file
di 01 34       # directory
ln 00 36       # link
pi 40 33       # pipe
so 00 35       #
bd 40 33 01
cd 40 33 01
or 01 05 37 41
mi 01 05 37 41
ex 00 91       # executable
ow 01 34       # other writables


*.cmd 00 32
*.exe 00 32

# archive, compressed things etc
*.gz  00 90
*.bz2 00 90
*.bz  00 90
*.tz  00 90
*.rpm 00 90
*.rar 00 90
*.zip 00 90
*.iso 00 90


*.cpio 00 31



# perl & CODE
*.c      33
*.h      33
*.sh     33
*.t      33
*.pm     33
*.pl     33
*.cgi    33
*.pod    33
*.PL     33
*.js     33
*.php    33
#*.xs

# strikethrough
*.off 00 9
*.bak 00 9
*.old 00 9


# documents misc, html webstuff
# really TEXT
*.htm    94
*.html   94
*.txt    94
*.text   94
*.css    94


# MOVIE
*.avi    96
*.wmv    96
*.mpeg   96
*.mpg    96
*.mov    96
*.AVI    96
*.WMV    96
*.mkv    96

# images & pdf
*.jpg    96
*.jpeg   96
*.png    96
*.xcf    96
*.JPG    96
*.gif    96
*.svg    96
*.eps 00 96
*.pdf 00 96
*.PDF 00 96
*.ps  00 96

*.ai  00 91 # adobe ill
*.doc 00 91 # msword shit

# data, such as .db, .csv
*.csv    95
*.dsv    95
*.db     95
*.sql    95
*.meta   95
# CONFS
*.xml    95
*.yaml   95
*.yml    95
*.conf   95
# [a-z0-9]*rc
")

#echo GOT: $LS_COLORS
#export LS_COLORS

# The codes are:
# code  0 = default colour
# code  1 = bold
# code  4 = underlined
# code  5 = flashing text
# code  6 = no change
# code  7  = reverse field
# code  8 = black
# code  9 = strikethrough (cool!)
# code  10 - 29= no change
# code  30  = light green
# code  31  = red
# code  32  = green
# code  33  = orange
# code  34  = blue
# code  35  = purple
# code  36  = cyan
# code  37  = grey
# code  38 = underline
# code  39 = no change
# code  40  = black background
# code  41  = red background
# code  42  = green background
# code  43  = orange background
# code  44  = blue background
# code  45  = purple background
# code  46  = cyan background
# code  47  = grey background
# code  90  = dark grey
# code  91  = light red
# code  92  = light green
# code  93  = yellow
# code  94  = light blue
# code  95  = light purple
# code  96  = turquoise
# code  100 = dark grey background
# code  101 = light red background
# code  102 = light green background
# code  103 = yellow background
# code  104 = light blue background
# code  105 = light purple background
# code  106 = turquoise background
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not working for a couple of reasons:

To run a script as an executable the first line has to tell the shell what program (i.e. which shell) should run the script, so you should start:

#!/bin/bash

or whichever shell you want (but see the note below).

Secondly, you can't execute this in tcsh because it uses a different syntax. You don't export environment variables, you use setenv with no equals sign. Additionally, $(command) means nothing to tcsh.

Another problem though is that if you run this script from a different shell, the variables set in it won't be carried back when it completes: when you run . ./script.sh it runs the script through the currently running shell.

Your best solution is to have two versions, one in this format, and one that works with tcsh, and to put them in your startup scripts, i.e ~/.bashrc or ~/.tcshrc.

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The syntax of tcsh is incompatible with that of sh.

If your login shell is sh and you only use tcsh interactively, set LS_COLORS in your ~/.profile.

If you have (t)csh as your login shell, you can run your script, print out the value of LS_COLORS and set it inside csh (presumably in your ~/.login).

setenv LS_COLORS `sh -c '. ~/path/to/file.sh; echo "$LS_COLORS"'`
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