Take the 2-minute tour ×
Unix & Linux Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a server with centos 5.3 x86_64 on it. I am trying to install some asterisk modules on this server using yum. So yum asked me to upgrade my kernel to "kernel-2.6.18-308.11.1.el5" Then i have upgraded the kernel using centos-plus repository as the required kernel was not available on base repo. Now after restarting i have tried again to install the same modules using yum but it is asking again for the "kernel-2.6.18-308.11.1.el5". Yum says:

Missing Dependency: kernel-x86_64 = 2.6.18-308.11.1.el5 is needed by package 

I have checked the kernel using "uname -r" command and it is showing :

# uname -r
2.6.18-308.11.1.el5.centos.plus

Then i saw the difference that mine installed kernel has *.centos.plus appended in the its name. that might be the reason yum is not recognizing the kernel.

Does any have the solution of this problem.? How can i make the yum see the installed kernel version?

share|improve this question

migrated from stackoverflow.com Jul 15 '12 at 14:44

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

2 Answers 2

Seems you have a 32bit kernel installed (the tag "x86_64" is missing in uname -r) and the requirement is for the 64bit kernel.

Example output for 64bit kernel:

# uname -r
2.6.32-279.el6.x86_64
share|improve this answer
    
The kernel installed is 64 bit. THe output of uname -a is "2.6.18-308.11.1.el5.centos.plus #1 SMP Tue Jul 10 16:44:19 EDT 2012 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux" i guess the issue is suffix of centos.plus in the end of kernel. so its not showing x86_64. If there is any way to change the name from "2.6.18-308.11.1.el5.centos.plus" to "2.6.18-308.11.1.el5" then that might help. Thanks for your answer –  aligator007 Jul 16 '12 at 8:21
    
Ultimately i have to reinstall my server from scratch and things are working good now –  aligator007 Jul 20 '12 at 8:16

You're looking at the running kernel with uname. Yum is looking at the RPM package database. It's very possible that you've done something so that you've got the kernel actually installed but it's missing from the database. Reinstalling (as you've done) is the easiest way to recover from this if you're not highly knowledgeable about how this all works.

But, going back a step: to see the kernels yum knows about, run:

yum list kernel

If the kernel you're looking for isn't in the list of installed packages, there's the problem.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.