Take the 2-minute tour ×
Unix & Linux Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of Linux, FreeBSD and other Un*x-like operating systems.. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am a complete beginner in Linux. I just installed Ubuntu 12.04 in a pendrive, then installed MySQL and Apache PHP and then I tried to install Moodle (a distance learning platform I use at work). The installation in Moodle stopped when the program tried to create a folder called moodledata inside the folder /var, and did not have permission to do so. So I did a chmod 777 to folder /var and removed the blockade, but I fear what I have done is not safe and I want to go back to the previous (initial/default) permission value of /var I can't find anywhere what value should it be. Can you help me? Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

rwxr-xr-x.
owner can: read, write and Execute
owner group can : read and execute
others can : read and execute

share|improve this answer
add comment

The default permission for /var is 755 = rwxr-xr-x: readable and executable (you need both for a directory) by everyone, and only writable by root.

Setting the permission on a file or directory to 777 is never right. In your case, you should

  • either have created the directory as root and then set its ownership to the user running Moodle (is this a web application? Then either www-data if the web application is supposed to write to this directory, or root if not);
  • or have configured the application to use a directory it can write to (e.g. under /var/www for a web application).
share|improve this answer
add comment

result of command : ls -l /var in Fedora 17 :

drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Jun  9 19:34 account
drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Feb  3 13:58 adm
drwxr-xr-x. 19 root root  4096 Jun  9 18:44 cache
drwxr-xr-x.  3 root root  4096 Jun 13 19:55 db
drwxr-xr-x.  3 root root  4096 Jun  9 19:34 empty
drwxr-xr-x.  3 root root  4096 Apr 26 18:58 ftp
drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Feb  3 13:58 games
drwxrwx--T.  2 root gdm   4096 Jun  9 03:35 gdm
drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Feb  3 13:58 gopher
drwxr-xr-x. 55 root root  4096 Jun 28 16:19 lib
drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Feb  3 13:58 local
lrwxrwxrwx.  1 root root    11 Jun  9 19:18 lock -> ../run/lock
drwxr-xr-x. 22 root root  4096 Jul  7 22:22 log
lrwxrwxrwx.  1 root root    10 Jun  9 19:18 mail -> spool/mail
drwxr-x---.  6 root named 4096 Jul  4 19:53 named
drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Feb  3 13:58 nis
drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Feb  3 13:58 opt
drwxr-xr-x.  2 root root  4096 Feb  3 13:58 preserve
lrwxrwxrwx.  1 root root     6 Jun  9 19:18 run -> ../run
drwxr-xr-x. 17 root root  4096 Jun  9 19:38 spool
drwxrwxrwt.  4 root root  4096 Jul  8 00:36 tmp
drwxr-xr-x.  8 root root  4096 Jun  9 19:34 www
drwxr-xr-x.  3 root root  4096 Jun  9 19:26 yp
share|improve this answer
add comment

I agree with what Gilles has said, and what you will want to do, is like you changed the permissions of the /var file, you can do the same back.

Like this is probably what you did:

chmod 775 /var

You would want to do something like this:

chmod 755 /var

How are examples of the permissions in numbers:

rwxrwxr-x = 775

rwxr-xr-x = 755

I hope you can get it sorted out.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.