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I got a macbook pro 7.1 wich is running OSX, i'm looking for the most compatible distribution to dual boot.

Here's my criteria :

  • I don't want to reinstall my system every 6 month, so I'll prefer a rolling release
  • I need fresh multimedia packets.
  • I would like to have full functionality of my touchpad
  • Sleep when lid close, as the default with OS X

I know there is plenty distribution around, i know this kind of question can turn into a troll really fast, so please just explain how compatible it is, what's the feature included and why you prefer one or another!

After a lot of investigations all around i decided to use Arch Linux.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are several rolling distros available. See Wikipedia.

If you have to ask then you're not ready for Arch Linux or Gentoo (although you might find them a fun way to learn more). Plus, there are several there I'm not familiar with, so I've ignored them.

I'd suggest Mint Debian Edition. I've not used it much myself, but Linux Mint has a good reputation, and should certainly meet 3 of your criteria.

My only doubt is full use of your touchpad. I think Ubuntu has support for some multitouch devices, but I'm not sure which, and I'm not sure whether it matters what desktop you use, or whether the other distros have it yet.

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I'm definitly not ready for Gentoo. To be honest my heart balance btw Arch & LMDE atm –  x_vi_r Jul 2 '12 at 15:01
2  
Arch is probably the best one if you want the latest version of unusual software (the Arch User Repository is great), but you have to know what you're doing. Linux Mint is far more user friendly, and would probably satisfy 95% of it's users. –  ams Jul 2 '12 at 15:35

if you want to start with arch be prepared to read and learn a lot of new stuff. If not go with mint as proposed. GL

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If you are comfortable with KDE then i would suggest CHAKRA currently using Pacman as Package Manager but no more ARCH-Based distribution and so it is Developing its own Package Manager called Akabei.

One of its Ideology is

Chakra is by default a GTk free distribution specially made for run Qt based applications and frameworks at full performance.

So for GTK based application they are providing Bundles of applications including Dependencies loosely based on MAC concept.

Also you can see the latest improvements here. Definitely Try it out from Live Media, also they seem to support the TouchPad type system ( search their forums :D).

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I'm not really into KDE, but yep Chakra seems to be kool. I didn't know it, thanks for that ! –  x_vi_r Jul 3 '12 at 18:32

By the way if you choose an LTS distribution you do not have to update your OS every 6 months, also with the update-manager you can just update your distribution very easily with many distributions like Ubuntu or Fedora , you don't really need to wipe your OS.

Also with a rolling distribution you better be a good problem solver and a guru of linux because the chances of having problems and malfunctions are really high; and if everything goes fine you have at least customize the configuration of your OS.

With just a standard distribution like the latest Ubuntu Precise Pangolin you are getting what you are looking for.

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Hmm, i'm not really into Ubuntu. It's quite heavy and the LTS comes with old packages. Well, yes, 12.04 is the lastest so it's ok but in 4 years that will not be the same story.. –  x_vi_r Jul 3 '12 at 18:29
    
an LTS can be upgraded to the newer distribution even if it's not an LTS, this are just the settings of the update-manager. –  user827992 Jul 3 '12 at 18:31
    
Yes, but that don't match the first of cryteria :) –  x_vi_r Jul 3 '12 at 18:34
    
actually yes, you can just update everything, you can also adopt a fixed partitioning scheme to save your home and your on a different section of your HDD. To be clear if you have Ubuntu 12.04 which is an LTS, you can update to the next 12.10 just by changing the settings in your update-manager. –  user827992 Jul 3 '12 at 18:37

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