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I really like using open source software and would like to help fund further development. Unfortunately, I have limited funds to do so. Being somewhat greedy, I would like to donate to the projects I use the most, but I am uncertain what those might be as many run somewhat behind the scenes.

What I would like to do is somehow log what programs I use the most but I am uncertain how. One thought I had was log the time each program spends having focus (ideally only while computer is unlocked). Logging the time a process spends actively doing something could be another metric. I'm not really sure how to track either of these.

What is the best way to track which software I use the most?

(For what it is worth, I generally use Arch Linux, but occasionally use Ubuntu, so portability would be appreciated.)

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Wakoopa (http://social.wakoopa.com) and RescueTime (http://www.rescuetime.com) seems to do what you want. They both require a client to run in the background to track the software you use. Not sure about RescueTime, but Wakoopa stops tracking software after 30 seconds without input from mouse or keyboard.

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Interesting sites. Both seem to be more advanced than I was originally thinking, but I it looks like they have good features. RescueTime doesn't have an official Linux client, but there is a third party one in the Arch repositories already. The Wakoopa package is flagged as out of date, so I'll probably give ResueTime a try first. –  ben Jun 2 '12 at 14:45
    
I've actually tried both for a short time. RescueTime was pretty detailed and had some nice graphs, but the unofficial client crashed after a while and I couldn't get it working again. Wakoopa works, and is simple enough. Shows how long you've been using the different kinds of software. –  westgaard Jun 2 '12 at 23:54
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