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We have an embedded version of Meego Linux running on an x86 chip-set that currently uses X11 as the window technology. For various reasons we want to remove X11 from the mix (along with mutter, we are using clutter as a graphic toolkit).

However, our main web browser needs to run in a X11 window. So far we have kept to using X11 for this reason. But we would like to run clutter just on the OpenGL layers.

I could start up X11 through running init 5 but would like to do it in a more gentle fashion.

Is there a way of starting and exiting X11 for this?

Thanks.

Update to answer questions - 4/05/2012:

  1. startx does not appear to be on the system...? Not sure how X starts without this. There is no .xsession either.

  2. You want to start X, and then exit immediately? Yes and No. Only want to exit X once the browser exits.

  3. Do you want the X window to display directly on the screen? In terms of the browser, yes. The browser is the only app that uses X11, and it is a full screen application (i.e. no 'window' type of scaling, moving, etc.)

  4. Do you need a specific web browser, or will any do? Yes, Very specific version.

  5. Do you need to run the browser and clutter at the same time? No. Once the browser has been launched, it takes full control until exited.

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Use startx with a customized ~/.xsession? –  Ulrich Dangel Jun 1 '12 at 16:00
    
You want to start X, and then exit immediately? –  Tim Jun 1 '12 at 18:17
    
Do you want the X window to display directly on the screen? Do you need a specific web browser, or will any do? Do you need to run the browser and clutter at the same time? –  Gilles Jun 1 '12 at 22:59
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

startx is just a script that wraps xinit and sets up an environment. You can probably copy it from just about any regular Linux install and customize it to your needs.

If you're also missing xinit, all it does is run /usr/bin/X :0 and xterm when invoked without options (it's only slightly fancier when wrapped by startx).

In other words, the lowest level way to run X is to run /usr/bin/X :0. After that simply run clients and connect them to that display.

X automatically exits when the last client disconnects.

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Thanks, this is quite useful. –  user626201 Jul 12 '12 at 9:30
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You can remove the display permanently if it is connected to a network and you are willing to run the browser on another machine via a remote X session. You can run the browser as if it was local either with X11 over SSH or using direct X11 control if you are in a trusted environment. The remote computer still needs the X11 host running but you can turn off the session.

I run several applications on my Windows machine through Xming over SSH. There is an option to start a single program (like the browser), run, and disconnect when you close the window.

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Thanks - but the requirement is to run it native. –  user626201 Jun 4 '12 at 14:51
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